3
3
8
1
2
6
3
2
Coins Certified as of 9/29

My Coin #06666130

1914-S $10 MS65

CERTIFICATION#: 06666130
PCGS#: 8877

Owner's Comments

Expert Comments

Ron Guth: As time has passed and more and more coins have been certified, we have a better, slightly different, view of the 1914-S $10 gold coins.  It is, indeed, a scarce date but not the incredible condition-rarity it was once believed to be.  In terms of overall population, the 1914-S mimics most closely the 1909-S and the 1916-S.  Substantial numbers of MS62 and MS63 examples of the 1914-S have appeared over the years.  While the population report numbers are nowhere near as high as those of common dates like the 1926 and 1932, there seems to be a sufficient supply to satisfy collector demand.  In MS64, the 1914-S becomes scarce but, even there, it is not nearly as rare as the 1909-S or the 1912-S.  MS65 is where the 1914-S really hits its stride -- only about a dozen or so examples have earned that grade.  Above MS65 the 1914-S is an extreme rarity, and only a single example has appeared at the MS66 level, with none finer.

David Akers (1975/88): The 1914-S is very similar in all aspects of rarity to the 1910-S and 1912-S. The entire Mint State population of this issue is not large and most of those are in the MS60 to 62 grades with only an occasional choice specimen (MS-63) being available. Above MS-63, the 1914-S is a major rarity and seldom, if ever, available. The Auction '79 and Kruthoffer specimens, both solid MS-65 coins, are the two best I have seen by a small margin, and there are perhaps five or six others that could be called gems. I have never seen or heard of anything that would qualify as better than MS-65, however. Overall, and especially in gem condition, the 1914-S is one of the rarest and most underrated issues in the series.

The typical 1914-S has much more lustre than the 1912-S or 1913-S and is very similar to the 1910-S and 1911-S in this important respect. All 1914-S eagles I have seen have been frosty and very sharply struck; some even show a trace of the "wire rim" that is so evident on the 1911-S and, sometimes, the 1913-S. Color is a definite strong point of this issue, typically rich greenish gold highlighted with rose or orange. Top grade examples of this issue are exceptionally pretty.

Diameter: 26.80 millimeters Designer: Augustus Saint Gaudens Edge: Raised Stars
Mintage: 208,000 Weight: 16.70 grams Metal Content: 90% Gold, 10% Copper
Go To Grade
  • 20
  • 25
  • 30
  • 35
  • 40
  • 45
  • 45+
  • 50
  • 50+
  • 53
  • 53+
  • 55
  • 55+
  • 58
  • 58+
  • 60
  • 61
  • 62
  • 62+
  • 63
  • 63+
  • 64
  • 64+
  • 65
  • 65+
  • 66
20
860
30
870
35
870
3
45+
980
50+
1,085
53+
1,155
55+
1,210
58+
1,750
1
62+
4,200
63+
9,000
3
64+
14,500
3
65+
52,500
1

Rarity and Survival Estimates

Grades Survival Estimate Numismatic Rarity Relative Rarity by Type Relative Rarity by Series
All Grades 3,000 R-4.4 12 / 27 14 / 32
60 or Better 1,200 R-4.9 12 / 27 TIE 14 / 32 TIE
65 or Better 27 R-8.9 10 / 27 10 / 32 TIE

Condition Census

Pos Grade Thumbnail Pedigree and History
1 MS66 PCGS grade  

American Numismatic Rarities 6/2006:2641, $253,000 - Kutasi Collection - Heritage 1/2007:3183, $161,000

1 MS66 estimated grade  
3 MS65+ PCGS grade
4 MS65 PCGS grade Simpson Collection
4 MS65 PCGS grade

Heritage 1/1999:8323 - Kutasi Collection - Heritage 1/2007:3182, $27,600 - Bentley Shores Collection - Stack's/Bowers 8/2013:4559, $30,550