$10,000 REWARD
JUST TO SEE IT!
1964-D Peace Dollar
Conceptual Front (Click to Enlarge)
Conceptual Rear (Click to Enlarge)
To learn more about the 1964-D Peace Dollar and all of the coins in the TOP 100 Modern U.S. Coins article, visit PCGS CoinFacts.

PCGS will pay a $10,000 reward just to see an authentic 1964-D Peace Dollar, a historic coin that was eagerly anticipated by collectors a half century ago, but never officially released into circulation.

The 1964-D Peace Dollar is the most controversial and one of the most famous of all modern issues and number one on the PCGS Top 100 U.S. Modern Coins list. That's why PCGS is offering a $10,000 cash reward just to view in person and verify a genuine 1964-D Peace Dollar.

If you can show us one, you'll receive a
$10,000 REWARD
and be the proud owner of arguably the most famous of all U.S. modern coins.

If you think you have a real 1964-D Peace Dollar, please submit the coin to PCGS for authentication, and we will determine whether it's authentic. In order to claim the reward, you must have an authentic example of a 1964-D Peace Dollar as verified by PCGS. The final decision rests with PCGS and its experts.

"Mint records indicate 316,076 1964-dated silver Peace dollars were struck at the Denver Mint in May 1965, but they were all were supposed to be destroyed," said Don Willis, President of PCGS.

The 1964 Peace dollars incorporated the same design created by sculptor Anthony de Francisci for the familiar Peace dollars issued from 1921 to 1935.

"Under August 1964 federal legislation, the Mint was supposed to strike 45 million new Peace dollars. When an official announcement was made in May 1965 that production had started, some coin dealers advertised that they'd pay $7.50 each to purchase them. Critics in Congress complained because there was already a coin shortage at the time. So the Mint halted production when it appeared the silver dollars would not circulate as intended but would instead be hoarded," PCGS CoinFacts™ President Ron Guth explained.

Eva Adams, the U.S. Mint Director at the time, said the 316,076 1964-D dollars that had been struck were classified as trial strikes and all were melted. But it has been speculated among numismatists that a few examples might remain. If you can show us one, you'll receive a $10,000 reward, and be the proud owner of arguably the most famous of all U.S. modern coins.