PCGS The Standard for the Rare Coin Industry
PCGS Set Registry® 85,242 Registered Sets

Cardinal Collection - 3rd

2009 2010 2011 2012
Current Statistics
Rank

3
GPA with Top Bonuses

67.071
GPA Weighted

66.738
Complete

100.00%
Set Rating

67.071
%RD

42.11%
Retired Statistics
Rank

1
GPA Weighted

66.738
Complete

100.00%
Set Rating

66.738

About This Set: The Mint Act of 1792 provided that the obverse of each coin must bear an image "emblematic of liberty," but how should "liberty" be portrayed? Should it be a metaphor for the freedom of time, as demonstrated by the sundial depicted on certain colonial issues, such as the Continental Dollar and Fugio cents? Perhaps a portrait of General George Washington, whose service during the Revolutionary War secured liberty for the country? Actually, quite a few different "Washington" cents were produced at that time, with that idea in mind.Ultimately, the early Mint engravers answered that question, taking their cue from the Libertas Americana medal. Conceived and brought to fruition through the efforts of Benjamin Franklin to commemorate the Colonies' victories in the War, the Libertas Americana medal is universally agreed to be the most beautiful of all American colonial medals.This set of Late Date Large cents, a subset of the Cardinal Collection Large Cent Date Set, is dedicated to the beauty of the Libertas Americana medal and her offspring, all of the beautiful portraits of Liberty that graced U.S. large cents. While nothing can quite compare with examining these amazing specimens in person, and seeing with your own eyes their beaming luster and sparkling shades of mint red and brown, the images that follow attempt to come as close as digitally possible. I hope you enjoy the display, and may you find it interesting and informative.

Cardinal Collection

Image Item PCGS # Date Denom Grade PCGS # Pop PCGS # Pop Higher Pop Pop Higher Comments
1839 37266 1839 1C MS65RB 3 1 52
N-8, not in Noyes. EAC65
1840 1822 1840 1C MS64RD 1 3 13
Addressing the public criticism, Mint Engraver Christian Gobrecht began his re-design of the Coronet Cents in 1835, but his true inspiration came after an art exhibition in Philadelphia in 1839. There Gobrecht viewed the painting "Omnia Vincit Amor" ("Love Conquers All"), by artist Benjamin West. Struck by the beauty of West's portrayal of Venus, the Roman goddess of love, Gobrecht became inspired for another complete redesign of his own portrait of Liberty. The result was what we now call the "Braided Hair" design -- so-called for the braid of hair across Liberty's forehead beneath her coronet. Braided Hair cents continued in production from the latter part of 1839 through the final end of large cents in 1857. The design remained essentially unchanged throughout, with just a subtle modification made during 1843, when the portrait was enlarged slightly and re-oriented in its position on the die. The initial design has come to be called the "Petite Head," while the later design is referred to as the "Mature Head." The 1840 cent is from the N-8 variety, and it is not in the Noyes census. EAC64
1841 403935 1841 1C MS66RB 1 21
N-4 Noyes #30875
1842 405817 1842 1C MS65RD 1 0 30
While "only" graded by PCGS as MS65RD, the collection's specimen of the 1842 "Petite Head" cent is THE single finest known Petite Head Cent. Previously from the incredible Naftzger Collection, this coin is listed as MS67 in Bill Noyes' official EAC condition census, and this monster is well deserving of that praise. Described by copper expert Stewart Blay as "THE most important coin" in the Naftzger sale of late date cents, this coin was hotly contested and realized a well-deserved record price. (N-2 Noyes #30965)
1843 403923 1843 1C MS66RB 2 0 40
1843 became the final transitional year for the portraits of Liberty on U.S. large cents, with the image of Liberty remodeled from the "Petite Head" to the "Mature Head", represented here by the N-4 Cent (Noyes #31380) and the N-6 cent (Noyes #31278).
1844 1857 1844 1C MS64RB 10 1 181
N-5, Noyes #56040
1845 397756 1845 1C MS65RB 1 75
N-6 Noyes #31553
1846 403866 1846 1C MS65RB 2 162
N-5 Noyes #31305
1847 37344 1847 1C MS66RB 1 35
N-32 Noyes #31415
1848 406462 1848 1C MS65RD 1 0 40
N-9 Noyes #30569
1849 405686 1849 1C MS65RB 5 164
N-22 Noyes #30527
1850 405906 1850 1C MS66RD 1 0 10
N-19 Noyes #30524
1851 406679 1851 1C MS65RD
N-10 Noyes #30989
1852 1900 1852 1C MS66RD 2 0 30
1853 1903 1853 1C MS66RD 15 1 161
N-25 Not in Noyes
1854 406128 1854 1C MS66RB 1 832
N-25 Noyes #30854
1855 1909 1855 1C MS66+ RD 2 0 30
Addressing the public criticism, Mint Engraver Christian Gobrecht began his re-design of the Coronet Cents in 1835, but his true inspiration came after an art exhibition in Philadelphia in 1839. There Gobrecht viewed the painting "Omnia Vincit Amor" ("Love Conquers All"), by artist Benjamin West. Struck by the beauty of West's portrayal of Venus, the Roman goddess of love, Gobrecht became inspired for another complete redesign of his own portrait of Liberty. The result was what we now call the "Braided Hair" design -- so-called for the braid of hair across Liberty's forehead beneath her coronet.-------------------------**Braided Hair cents continued in production from the latter part of 1839 through the final end of large cents in 1857. The design remained essentially unchanged throughout, with just a subtle modification made during 1843, when the portrait was enlarged slightly and re-oriented in its position on the die. The initial design has come to be called the "Petite Head," while the later design is referred to as the "Mature Head." The collection contains examples of both, both in magnificent gem condition.--------------------------------------------------------------------------**While "only" graded by PCGS as MS65RD, the collection's specimen of the 1842 "Petite Head" cent is THE single finest known Petite Head Cent. Previously from the incredible Naftzger Collection, this coin is listed as MS67 in Bill Noyes' official EAC condition census, and this monster is well deserving of that praise. Described by copper expert Stewart Blay as "THE most important coin" in the Naftzger sale of late date cents, this coin was hotly contested and realized a well-deserved record price.----------------------------------------------------------------------**While the Collection includes a number of awe inspiring pop-top "Mature Head" cents, its 1852 cent is the real standout. Another amazing Naftzger coin, this one appeared as Lot #1134 -- perhaps the very finest of all Braided Hair cents for the entire series 1839 to 1857. Numerous experts have opined the coin as MS67RD, and veteran dealer Laura Sperber has even been quoted in the numismatic press as stating it is the single finest large cent remaining from the 1850's era! Perhaps even more astonishing, though, is the fact that Bill Noyes has this coin listed in his official EAC condition census as MS69!! High praise, but then this museum piece is fully deserving.
1856 1923 1856 1C MS66RB 2 449
N-14 Not in Noyes
1857 389635 1857 1C MS65RB 2 1 1011
N-1 Noyes #31126