PCGS The Standard for the Rare Coin Industry
PCGS Set Registry® 82,598 Registered Sets

The Good Collection - 14th

Current Statistics
Rank

14
GPA with Top Bonuses

69.000
GPA Weighted

69.000
Complete

65.12%
Set Rating

44.930

The Good Collection

Image Item PCGS # Date Denom Grade PCGS # Pop PCGS # Pop Higher Pop Pop Higher Comments
2007-S George Washington First Strike 148060 2007-S $1 PR69DC 7390 270 7390270
2007-S George Washington Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-3 } First Strike (Jul'2007) The first president of the United States got his image on another US coin, this time the first in the series of presidential dollars. This series is unusual for the engraved lettering on the edge that provides the date and mint mark and motto.
2007-S George Washington 397805 2007-S $1 PR69DC 1534 181 6888859
2007-S George Washington (1789-1797) Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } (Apr'2013) First issue of this very collectible series of Americana. The first president of the United States left quite an act to follow. Some met the challenge, some did not. His self-imposed two-term limit was followed until World War II loomed on the horizon. George Washington already graces the quarter and one dollar bill, still in production at the time this one dollar coin was minted, and has also appeared on the half-dollar and half-eagle!
2007-S John Adams First Strike 148061 2007-S $1 PR69DC 7346 189 7346189
2007-S John Adams Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-3 } First Strike (Jul'2007) 2nd President (1797-1801)
2007-S John Adams 397806 2007-S $1 PR69DC 1551 187 6935786
2007-S John Adams (1797-1801) Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } (Apr'2013) This dogmatic founding father served just one term as president of the United States, transitioning into the nineteenth century. At the time of his death he lamented that an old adversary was surviving him with his final words "Jefferson Lives!" In fact, unbeknownst to him, Jefferson had passed away just before him on that very same Independence Day evening in 1826.
2007-S Thomas Jefferson First Strike 148062 2007-S $1 PR69DC 7294 303 7294303
2007-S Thomas Jefferson Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } First Strike (Jul'2007) 3rd President (1801-1809)
2007-S Thomas Jefferson 397807 2007-S $1 PR69DC 1529 197 6759923
2007-S Thomas Jefferson (1801-1809) Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } (Apr'2013) One of the few presidents and founding fathers to be featured regularly (and currently) on both commonly used coinage and currency, this first-year dollar offsets the highly frosted devices with deep black mirrors. His negotiation with Napoleon to acquire the Louisiana Territory was instrumental in the implementation of the Manifest Destiny that was to be this country's expansion over the coming years, and both the good and the bad that went with that.
2007-S James Madison First Strike 148063 2007-S $1 PR69DC 7412 252 7412252
2007-S James Madison Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-3 } First Strike (Jul'2007) 4th President (1809-1817)
2007-S James Madison 397808 2007-S $1 PR69DC 1561 189 6943853
2007-S James Madison (1809-1817) Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } (Apr'2013) This two-term president presided over the United States during the most tumultuous early days of this country that included the War of 1812, from which the Star Spangled Banner was inspired. Events of that period included that sacking and burning of the White House by British troops, and the heroic efforts of his wife Dolly Madison to save some of our national treasures.
2008-S James Monroe First Strike 394880 2008-S $1 PR69DC 2890 173 2890173
2008-S James Monroe Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } First Strike (Jun'2008) 5th President (1817-1825)
2008-S James Monroe 397809 2008-S $1 PR69DC 1621 188 5418695
2008-S James Monroe (1817-1825) Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } (Apr'2013) Statesman, founding father, fifth president, and author of the Monroe Doctrine which sought to prevent European expansion beyond existing colonization in the New World, this coin honors another strong leader that greatly influenced the development of a young nation.
2008-S John Quincy Adams First Strike 394882 2008-S $1 PR69DC 2787 258 2787258
2008-S John Quincy Adams Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } First Strike (Jun'2008) 6th President (1825-1829)
2008-S John Quincy Adams 397810 2008-S $1 PR69DC 1600 236 5326862
2008-S John Quincy Adams (1825-1829) Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } (Apr'2013) Our sixth president was the first president to share the same last name as a former president, the first to have a father as a former president, and along with his father the only presidents to date to be one-term presidents. His life included a long list of remarkable accomplishments, including negotiating the Treaty of Ghent which ended the War of 1812 and as president paying off most of the National Debt.
2008-S Andrew Jackson First Strike 394884 2008-S $1 PR69DC 2924 131 2924131
2008-S Andrew Jackson Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } First Strike (Jun'2008) 7th President (1829-1837)
2008-S Andrew Jackson 397811 2008-S $1 PR69DC 1623 201 5420697
2008-S Andrew Jackson (1829-1837) Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } (Apr'2013) Another president familiar to Americans from his likeness on the twenty-dollar bill, he first came to national attention from his military exploits during the Battle of New Orleans fought after a peace agreement had been reached in the War of 1812. Nicknamed "Old Hickory" for his toughness and aggressive personality; he fought in duels, some fatal to his opponents. Although he believed in a limited federal government, and was a staunch advocate of states rights, during the Nullification Crisis he declared that states do not have the right to nullify federal laws.
2008-S Martin Van Buren First Strike 394886 2008-S $1 PR69DC 2874 180 2874180
2008-S Martin Van Buren Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } First Strike (Jun'2008) 8th President (1837-1841)
2008-S Martin Van Buren 397812 2008-S $1 PR69DC 1585 251 5394793
2008-S Martin Van Buren (1837-1841) Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } (Apr'2013) This was the first president not of British or Irish descent, coming from Dutch heritage. He is the only president not to have spoken English as a first language, and he is the first president to have been born a United States citizen. His administration was largely characterized by the economic hardship of his time, the Panic of 1837. He was scapegoated for the depression and called "Martin Van Ruin" by his political opponents. He was voted out of office after just one term.
2009-S William Henry Harrison 408613 2009-S $1 PR69DC 1373 185 4492746
2009-S William Harrison (1841) Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } (Apr'2013) William Henry Harrison was the last president to be born before the signing of the Declaration of Independence, and was to oldest person to be inaugurated as president until Ronald Reagan in 1981. His was also the shortest presidency, dying of complications from pneumonia on his 32nd day in office, no doubt brought on by his longest ever inaugural address in bone-chilling weather. His death sparked a brief constitutional crisis, but that crisis ultimately resolved many questions about presidential succession left unanswered by the Constitution until passage of the 25th Amendment. He was the first president to die in office, and his term began the first of twenty year curses for those presidents winning office in a year evenly divisible by 20, a curse not broken until again Ronald Reagan who won in 1980 (and was shot but not killed).
2009-S William Henry Harrison First Strike 407396 2009-S $1 PR69DC 758 118 758118
2009-S William Harrison Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } First Strike (May'2013) 9th President (1841)
2009-S John Tyler 408614 2009-S $1 PR69DC 1400 136 4621558
2009-S John Tyler (1841-1845) Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } (Apr'2013) Tyler was the first president to succeed to office following the death of the incumbent. The two had campaigned with the slogan "Tippecanoe and Tyler Too!" In office, he managed to alienate both the Democrats and his own Whig party, and failed to get the nomination for a second term. He dedicated the last half of his term in office to the annexation of Texas, which would eventually be signed by his successor. The era of the great leaders in the Oval Office that had graced the inception of this country was over, but there would be others that would step up from time to time. In the beginning, it was politics that had held us together. Now, it was becoming clear that politics would become what would try to drive us apart.
2009-S John Tyler First Strike 407398 2009-S $1 PR69DC 773 94 77394
2009-S John Tyler Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } First Strike (May'2013) 10th President (1841-1845)
2009-S James Knox Polk 408615 2009-S $1 PR69DC 1379 179 4513697
2009-S James Polk (1845-1849) Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } (Apr'2013) Polk was the last strong pre–Civil War president, and he is the earliest of whom there are surviving photographs taken during a term in office. He is noted for his foreign policy successes. He threatened war with Britain over the issue of which nation owned the Oregon Country, then backed away and split the ownership of the region with Britain. When Mexico rejected American annexation of Texas, Polk led the nation to a sweeping victory in the Mexican-American War, which gave the United States most of its present Southwest. As he had promised, he served just one term. He died three months after leaving office of cholera.
2009-S James Knox Polk First Strike 407400 2009-S $1 PR69DC 748 116 748116
2009-S James Polk Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } First Strike (May'2013) 11th President (1845-1849)
2009-S Zachary Taylor 408616 2009-S $1 PR69DC 1323 244 4366890
2009-S Zachary Taylor (1849-1850) Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } (Apr'2013) Known as "Old Rough and Ready" earned during a 40-year career that had several highlights in the Indian Wars, as president he angered many Southerners by taking a moderate stance on the issue of slavery. He urged settlers in New Mexico and California to bypass the territorial stage and draft constitutions for statehood, setting the stage for the Compromise of 1850. He was also the last sitting president to own slaves. He died, in office, of what is thought to be gastroenteritis.
2009-S Zachary Taylor First Strike 407402 2009-S $1 PR69DC 728 161 728161
2009-S Zachary Taylor Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } First Strike (May'2013) 12th President (1849-1850)
2010-S Millard Fillmore First Strike 417261 2010-S $1 PR69DC 2420 182 2420182
2010-S Millard Fillmore Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } First Strike (Apr'2013) 13th President (1850-1853)
2010-S Millard Fillmore 417879 2010-S $1 PR69DC 1063 136 3924549
2010-S Millard Fillmore (1850-1853) Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } (Apr'2013) Fillmore was the last member of the Whig Party to hold the office of POTUS. He succeeded to office after Zachary Taylor died in office. After his presidency, he joined the Know-Nothing movement; throughout the Civil War, he opposed President Abraham Lincoln and during Reconstruction supported President Andrew Johnson. He is consistently included in the bottom 10 of historical rankings of Presidents of the United States.
2010-S Franklin Pierce First Strike 417263 2010-S $1 PR69DC 2312 227 2312227
2010-S Franklin Pierce Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } First Strike (Apr'2013) 14th President (1853-1857)
2010-S Franklin Pierce 417880 2010-S $1 PR69DC 1050 172 3925593
2010-S Franklin Pierce (1853-1857) Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } (Apr'2013) As president, he made many divisive decisions which were widely criticized and earned him a reputation as one of the worst presidents in U.S. history. Pierce's popularity in the Northern states declined sharply after he supported the Kansas–Nebraska Act, which replaced the Missouri Compromise and renewed debate over the expansion of slavery in the American West. He was a northerner with southern sympathies, and once these became known his reputation was irreversibly damaged. He is the only president to come from New Hampshire (if you don't count Josiah Edward "Jed" Bartlet) whose party abandoned him after his first term in office.
2010-S James Buchanan First Strike 417265 2010-S $1 PR69DC 2292 193 2292193
2010-S James Buchanan Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } First Strike (Apr'2013) 15th President (1857-1861)
2010-S James Buchanan 417881 2010-S $1 PR69DC 1061 133 3932493
2010-S James Buchanan (1857-1861) Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } (Apr'2013) He is the only president from Pennsylvania and the only president who remained a lifelong bachelor. During Pierce's term he served in London as a minister to the Court of St. James' and therefore was not caught up in the crossfire of sectional politics that dominated the country. Buchanan was viewed by many as a compromise between the two sides of the slavery question. Like Pierce, he was considered a "doughface", a northerner with southern sympathies. Buchanan's efforts to maintain peace between the North and the South alienated both sides, and the Southern states declared their secession in the prologue to the American Civil War. Historians have argued that his failure to deal with secession the worst presidential mistake ever made.
2010-S Abraham Lincoln First Strike 417267 2010-S $1 PR69DC 2543 174 2543174
2010-S Abraham Lincoln Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } First Strike (Apr'2013) 16th President (1861-1865)
2010-S Abraham Lincoln 417882 2010-S $1 PR69DC 1125 133 4023496
2010-S Abraham Lincoln (1861-1865) Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } (Apr'2013) Without a doubt, this man is one example, albeit the most extreme example, of the good fortune this country has had of having the right man in the oval office at the right time. There were others before him and since, but he alone stands head and shoulders above the others for the daily turmoil endured, not just in dealing in matters of state, but in his personal life as well. His Gettysburg Address, terse by standards of the day, is hailed as the model of great oratory. He guided this country through the Civil War and held the nation together. He was the second consecutive president to die in office, victim of the "twenty-year curse", having been elected in a year evenly divisible by twenty.
2011-S Andrew Johnson First Strike 505212 2011-S $1 PR69DC 1850 288 1850288
2011-S Andrew Johnson Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } First Strike (Apr'2013) 17th President (1865-1869)
2011-S Andrew Johnson 505985 2011-S $1 PR69DC 829 173 3583646
2011-S Andrew Johnson (1865-1869) Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } (Apr'2013) As Abraham Lincoln's vice president, Johnson became president when Lincoln was assassinated. A Democrat who ran with Lincoln on the National Union ticket, Johnson came to office as the Civil War concluded. The new president favored quick restoration of the seceded states to the Union. His plans did not give protection to the former slaves, and he came into conflict with the Republican-dominated Congress, culminating in his impeachment by the House of Representatives. The first American president to be impeached, he was acquitted in the Senate by one vote.
2011-S Ulysses S. Grant First Strike 505214 2011-S $1 PR69DC 1881 268 1881268
2011-S Ulysses S. Grant Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } First Strike (Apr'2013) 18th President (1869-1877)
2011-S Ulysses S. Grant 505986 2011-S $1 PR69DC 848 123 3633482
2011-S Ulysses S. Grant (1869-1877) Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } (Apr'2013) He became POTUS following his highly successful role as a war general in the second half of the Civil War. There were those close to Lincoln who complained to him about the General's heavy drinking, to which he is supposed to have replied, "Well find out what he's drinking, and give a case of it to each of my other generals!" Grant's two consecutive terms as President stabilized the nation after the American Civil War and during the turbulent Reconstruction period that followed.
2011-S Rutherford B. Hayes First Strike 505217 2011-S $1 PR69DC 1880 271 1880271
2011-S Rutherford B. Hayes Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } First Strike (Apr'2013) 19th President (1877-1881)
2011-S Rutherford B. Hayes 505987 2011-S $1 PR69DC 855 127 3662515
2011-S Rutherford Hayes (1877-1881) Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } (Apr'2013) As president, he oversaw the end of Reconstruction and the United States' entry into the Second Industrial Revolution. Hayes was a reformer who began the efforts that led to civil service reform and attempted, unsuccessfully, to reconcile the divisions that had led to the American Civil War fifteen years earlier.
2011-S James Garfield First Strike 505219 2011-S $1 PR69DC 1849 263 1849263
2011-S James Garfield Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } First Strike (Apr'2013) 20th President (1881)
2011-S James Garfield 505988 2011-S $1 PR69DC 838 150 3650522
2011-S James Garfield (1881) Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } (Apr'2013) Garfield's presidency lasted just 200 days, until he became the second of four presidents to be assassinated while in office. President Garfield advocated a bi-metal monetary system, agricultural technology, an educated electorate, and civil rights for African-Americans. He proposed substantial civil service reform, eventually passed by Congress in 1883 and signed into law by his successor, Chester A. Arthur, as the Pendleton Civil Service Reform Act.
2012-S Chester Arthur First Strike 512430 2012-S $1 PR69DC 743 96 74396
2012-S Chester A. Arthur Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } First Strike (Apr'2013) 21st President (1881-1885)
2012-S Chester Arthur 512879 2012-S $1 PR69DC 283 85 1351305
2012-S Chester A. Arthur (1881-1885) Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } (Jul'2013) Becoming President after the assassination of President James A. Garfield, Arthur struggled to overcome suspicions due to his beginnings as a politician from the New York City Republican machine, succeeding at that task by embracing the cause of civil service reform. His advocacy and then enforcement of the Pendleton Civil Service Reform Act was the centerpiece of his administration. Suffering from poor health, Arthur made only a limited effort to secure renomination in 1884; he retired at the close of his term. As journalist Alexander McClure would later write, "No man ever entered the Presidency so profoundly and widely distrusted as Chester Alan Arthur, and no one ever retired ... more generally respected, alike by political friend and foe."
2012-S Grover Cleveland 22nd First Strike 512431 2012-S $1 PR69DC 745 85 74585
2012-S Grover Cleveland Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } First Strike (Apr'2013) 22nd President (1885-1889)
2012-S Grover Cleveland 22nd 512880 2012-S $1 PR69DC 282 79 1347312
2012-S Grover Cleveland (1885-1889) Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } (Jul'2013) Cleveland was the leader of the pro-business Bourbon Democrats who opposed high tariffs, Free Silver, inflation, imperialism and subsidies to business, farmers or veterans. His battles for political reform and fiscal conservatism made him an icon for American conservatives of the era. Cleveland won praise for his honesty, independence, integrity, and commitment to the principles of classical liberalism. Cleveland relentlessly fought political corruption, patronage, and bossism. Indeed, as a reformer his prestige was so strong that the reform wing of the Republican Party, called "Mugwumps", largely bolted the GOP ticket and swung to his support in 1884.
2012-S Benjamin Harrison First Strike 512433 2012-S $1 PR69DC 751 85 75185
2012-S Benjamin Harrison Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } First Strike (Apr'2013) 23rd President (1889-1893)
2012-S Benjamin Harrison 512881 2012-S $1 PR69DC 287 76 1368276
2012-S Benjamin Harrison (1889-1893) Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } (Apr'2013) Harrison, a Republican, was elected to the presidency in 1888, defeating the Democratic incumbent Grover Cleveland. His administration is remembered most for economic legislation, including the McKinley Tariff and the Sherman Antitrust Act, and for annual federal spending that reached one billion dollars for the first time. Democrats attacked the "Billion Dollar Congress." They used the issue, along with the growing unpopularity of the high tariff, to defeat the Republicans, in both the 1890 mid-term elections and in Harrison's bid for re-election in 1892. Harrison advocated, although unsuccessfully, for federal education funding and legislation to protect voting rights for African Americans. He also saw the admittance of six states into the Union.
2012-S Grover Cleveland 24th First Strike 512432 2012-S $1 PR69DC 710 124 710124
2012-S Grover Cleveland Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } First Strike (Apr'2013) 24th President (1893-1897)
2012-S Grover Cleveland 24th 512882 2012-S $1 PR69DC 284 83 1364294
2012-S Grover Cleveland (1893-1897) Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } (Apr'2013) Grover Cleveland was the 22nd and 24th President of the United States. Cleveland is the only president to serve two non-consecutive terms (1885–1889 and 1893–1897) and therefore is the only individual to be counted twice in the numbering of the presidents. He was the winner of the popular vote for president three times—in 1884, 1888, and 1892—and was the only Democrat elected to the presidency in the era of Republican political domination that lasted from 1861 to 1913. Cleveland took strong positions and was heavily criticized. His intervention in the Pullman Strike of 1894 to keep the railroads moving angered labor unions nationwide and angered the party in Illinois; his support of the gold standard and opposition to Free Silver alienated the agrarian wing of the Democratic Party. Furthermore, critics complained that he had little imagination and seemed overwhelmed by the nation's economic disasters—depressions and strikes—in his second term. Even so, his reputation for honesty and good character survived the troubles of his second term. Biographer Allan Nevins wrote: "in Grover Cleveland the greatness lies in typical rather than unusual qualities. He had no endowments that thousands of men do not have. He possessed honesty, courage, firmness, independence, and common sense. But he possessed them to a degree other men do not."
2013-S Theodore Roosevelt First Strike 517338 2013-S $1 PR69DC 885 193 885193
2013-S Theodore Roosevelt Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } First Strike (Apr'2013) 26th President (1901-1909)
2013-S Theodore Roosevelt 517634 2013-S $1 PR69DC 191 67 1639453
2013-S Theodore Roosevelt (1901-1909) Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } (May'2014) Roosevelt became President after McKinley was assassinated. He was inaugurated at age 42, the youngest person to become president. He attempted to move the GOP toward Progressivism, including trust busting and increased regulation of businesses. In November 1904 he was reelected in a landslide against conservative Democrat Alton Brooks Parker. Roosevelt called his domestic policies a "Square Deal", promising a fair deal to the average citizen while breaking up monopolistic corporations, holding down railroad rates, and guaranteeing pure food and drugs. He was the first president to speak out on conservation, and he greatly expanded the system of national parks and national forests. By 1907 he propounded more radical reforms, which were blocked by the conservative Republicans in Congress. His foreign policy focused on the Caribbean, where he built the Panama Canal and guarded its approaches. There were no wars, but his slogan, "Speak softly and carry a big stick" was underscored by sending the greatly expanded Navy—the Great White Fleet—on a world tour. He negotiated an end to the Russo-Japanese War, for which he won the Nobel Peace Prize. He is one of four presidents featured on Mount Rushmore.
2013-S William McKinley First Strike 517340 2013-S $1 PR69DC 908 181 908181
2013-S William McKinley Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } First Strike (Apr'2013) 25th President (1897-1901)
2013-S William McKinley 517635 2013-S $1 PR69DC 213 48 1689363
2013-S William McKinley (1897-1901) Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } (Apr'2013) Rapid economic growth marked McKinley’s presidency. He promoted the 1897 Dingley Tariff to protect manufacturers and factory workers from foreign competition, and in 1900, he secured the passage of the Gold Standard Act. McKinley hoped to persuade Spain to grant independence to rebellious Cuba without conflict, but when negotiation failed, he led the nation in the Spanish–American War of 1898; the U.S. victory was quick and decisive. As part of the peace settlement, Spain turned over to the United States its main overseas colonies of Puerto Rico, Guam, and the Philippines; Cuba was promised independence, but at that time remained under the control of the U.S. Army. The United States annexed the independent Republic of Hawaii in 1898 and it became a U.S. territory. Six months into his second term McKinley was assassinated.
2013-S William H. Taft First Strike 517342 2013-S $1 PR69DC 834 248 834248
2013-S William Taft Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } First Strike (Apr'2013) 27th President (1909-1913)
2013-S William H. Taft 517636 2013-S $1 PR69DC 218 42 1723356
2013-S William H. Taft (1909-1813) Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } (May'2014) Riding a wave of popular support for fellow Republican Theodore Roosevelt. In his only term, Taft's domestic agenda emphasized trust-busting, civil service reform, strengthening the Interstate Commerce Commission, improving the performance of the postal service, and passage of the Sixteenth Amendment. Abroad, Taft sought to further the economic development of nations in Latin America and Asia through "Dollar Diplomacy", and showed decisiveness and restraint in response to revolution in Mexico.
2013-S Woodrow Wilson First Strike 517344 2013-S $1 PR69DC 871 199 871199
2013-S Woodrow Wilson Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } First Strike (Apr'2013) 28th President (1913-1921)
2013-S Woodrow Wilson 517637 2013-S $1 PR69DC 211 56 1685391
2013-S Woodrow Wilson (1913-1921) Presidential Dollar PR69DCAM { PCGS-4 } (May'2014) In his first term as President, Wilson persuaded a Democratic Congress to pass a legislative agenda that few presidents have equaled, remaining unmatched up until the New Deal in 1933. This agenda included the Federal Reserve Act, Federal Trade Commission Act, the Clayton Antitrust Act, the Federal Farm Loan Act and an income tax. Child labor was curtailed by the Keating–Owen Act of 1916, but the U.S. Supreme Court declared it unconstitutional in 1918. Wilson also had Congress pass the Adamson Act, which imposed an 8-hour workday for railroads. He narrowly won a second term, winning with the slogan "He kept us out of war." Unrestricted German submarine attacks however would soon draw the United States into World War I. For his sponsorship of the League of Nations, Wilson was awarded the 1919 Nobel Peace Prize.
2014-S Warren G. Harding First Strike 526314 2014-S $1
2014-S Warren G. Harding 2014-S $1
2014-S Calvin Coolidge First Strike 526313 2014-S $1
2014-S Calvin Coolidge 2014-S $1
2014-S Herbert Hoover First Strike 526312 2014-S $1
2014-S Herbert Hoover 2014-S $1
2014-S Franklin D. Roosevelt First Strike 526311 2014-S $1
2014-S Franklin D. Roosevelt 2014-S $1
2015-P Harry S. Truman First Strike 545176 2015-P $1
2015-P Harry S. Truman 2015-P $1
2015-S Harry S. Truman First Strike 539583 2015-S $1
2015-S Harry S. Truman 2015-S $1
2015-P Dwight D. Eisenhower First Strike 546161 2015-P $1
2015-P Dwight D. Eisenhower 2015-P $1
2015-S Dwight D. Eisenhower First Strike 541302 2015-S $1
2015-S Dwight D. Eisenhower 2015-S $1
2015-P John F. Kennedy First Strike 568442 2015-P $1
2015-P John F. Kennedy 568441 2015-P $1
2015-S John F. Kennedy First Strike 541304 2015-S $1
2015-S John F. Kennedy 2015-S $1
2015-P Lyndon B. Johnson First Strike 570402 2015-P $1
2015-P Lyndon B. Johnson 593634 2015-P $1
2015-S Lyndon B. Johnson First Strike 541306 2015-S $1
2015-S Lyndon B. Johnson 2015-S $1
2016-S Richard Nixon First Strike 2016-S $1
2016-S Richard Nixon 2016-S $1
2016-S Gerald Ford First Strike 2016-S $1
2016-S Gerald Ford 2016-S $1
2016-S Ronald Reagan First Strike 2016-S $1
2016-S Ronald Reagan 2016-S $1