PCGS The Standard for the Rare Coin Industry
PCGS Set Registry® 82,586 Registered Sets

Libertas Americana through Time

Description:<br>Following the decisive victories at Saratoga and Yorktown, Benjamin Franklin wrote to the United States Secretary of Foreign Affairs Robert Livingston, "This puts me in mind of a medal I have had a mind to strike ... representing the United States by the figure of an infant Hercules in his cradle, strangling the two serpents; and France by that of Minerva, sitting by as his nurse, with her spear and helmet, and her robe specked by a few 'fleurs-de-lis.'" That concept of Benjamin Franklin's vision of Liberty -- the beautiful Libertas Americana Medal struck in 1783 – struck a chord with the people and nations of the world, and ultimately became the inspiration for the flowing hair Liberty coinage of the First U.S. Mint, as well as an extended series of related tokens and restrike medals. <img src="http://caimages.collectors.com/coinimages/456/1178741/Libertas%20Collection%20Poster.jpg" border="0"> <br>Immediately after their striking, announcements of the Medals began spreading across the globe, appearing first in the London Magazine in March 1783. More announcements followed in the Gentlemen’s Magazine in March 1783, the New Annual Register in April 1783, and the first published image of the Medal (albeit incorrect) appeared in the Hibernian Magazine in December 1783. The first accurate image of the Libertas Americana Medal was published the following year, in the Historisch Genealogischer Calender. <br>The influence of Franklin's vision has continued ever since -- seen in the first coins of the U.S. Mint, like the 1792 Disme, and echoed in the patriotic tokens of the centennial era and the dramatic restrikes of the bicentennial and beyond.

Image PCGS # Date Denom Variety Grade Pop Pop Higher Comments
1784 Medal Betts-619 Bronze MS65BN1784 Medal Betts-619 Bronze MS65BN1784 Medal Betts-619 Bronze MS65BN1784 Medal Betts-619 Bronze MS65BN1784 Medal Betts-619 Bronze MS65BN1784 Medal Betts-619 Bronze MS65BN1784 Medal Betts-619 Bronze MS65BN1784 Medal Betts-619 Bronze MS65BN1784 Medal Betts-619 Bronze MS65BN 528695 1784 Medal Betts-619 Bronze Franklin Winged Genius MS65BN 1 0 From concept to realization, execution, delivery, payment, and worldwide press coverage, Benjamin Franklin truly was THE man behind the historic Libertas Americana medals. He leveraged his position in France as the Minister Plenipotentiary representing the United States to garner support and connect with the preeminent artists and engravers of the day, and he personally stewarded the process to bring the Medals into reality. Even after the designs and prototypes were approved and the completed medals were struck, Franklin continued on, ensuring that the entire world would know of the medals and the historic victories they commemorated. Press coverage began immediately, with articles in the London Magazine March 3, 1783, the Gentlemens Magazine (London) for March 1783, the New Annual Register (London) for April 10, 1783, the Hibernian Magazine (Ireland) for December 1783, the Historisch Genealogischer Calender (Berlin) for 1784, the Vanderlandsche Historie (Netherlands) for 1790, and the Monthly Magazine (Britain) for December 1797. From the very beginning, the Flowing Hair image of Lady Liberty was described as a "fine woman" and a "beautiful maiden." As one might expect of the British holding a grudge for nearly 15 years, in 1797 they dismissed George Washington as a mere "Virginian Planter," and Benjamin Franklin as simply a "Printer of Philadephia," and they took offense with Britain having been "insultingly typified" as an "affrighted Leopard." Yet, even THEY still had to admit that the allusion of America as "Hercules strangling the Serpents that had assaulted its Infancy...must be allowed to be appropriate"!
(1781) Medal Libertas Americana MS63BN(1781) Medal Libertas Americana MS63BN 151815 (1781) Medal Libertas Americana Bronze MS63BN 14 14 Perhaps the single earliest example of Miss Liberty created by Augustin Dupre in metallic form, this unique incused oval die was completely unknown to the world at large until the Dupre Family Archive was released by Augustin's descendants and dispersed in the Spring of 2014. Here we see the genesis of the Flowing Hair Liberty design, with her locks flowing behind her, a single lock crossing her neck, and a phrygian cap beneath the truncation of her bust as a symbol of freedom and the pursuit of Liberty.
(1781) Medal Libertas Americana MS61(1781) Medal Libertas Americana MS61(1781) Medal Libertas Americana MS61 151000 (1781) Medal Libertas Americana Silver MS61 3 8 The unanimous choice for the Number 1 spot in the 100 Greatest American Medals and Tokens, the original 1780's Libertas Americana Medals have been famous for the entirety of their 200+ year history. Conceived, commissioned, and funded by Benjamin Franklin himself, the Medals were ordered and delivered on at least four separate occasions between March 1783 and September 1784, likely totaling to 60 silver medals and 200 bronze. Each order included silver and bronze medals, all struck from a single set of dies, which still remain at the Paris Mint. Accordingly, some of the bronze medals were struck before certain of the silver medals. Progressive deterioration of the dies can be seen, and can distinguish early strikes from late strikes. From this, we can know that the first group of silver medals were struck before the bronze medals, as all bronze examples seen show greater die damage than the earliest of the silver medals. The specific silver example seen here displays the very earliest state of the dies seen by this researcher, and thus was likely included in the first group of 20 silver medals delivered to Franklin and covered with his payment of April 4th, 1783. These earliest of medals were presented personally by Franklin, and are thought to have been accompanied by hand-written copies of the "Explication" of their symbolism and meaning, using the draft sent to Franklin on March 31, 1783 by Abbe Andre Morellet. The Explication was later printed in an official format by Philippe-Denis Pierres, with 300 copies delivered to Franklin on May 5, 1783. Today, original specimens of the Explication are exceedingly rare, with the example in the Collection being perhaps the sole copy in private hands.
1976 Medal Libertas Americana Silver - Copy of Orig Design MS66 509899 1976 Medal Libertas Am. Silver Copy of Original Design MS66 1 1 An incredibly well-preserved original Silver specimen, formerly from the incomparable collection of Virgil Brand, this medal is a likely contender for the finest known original Silver Libertas Americana Medal (PCGS grading pending). Free from noticeable handling this specimen displays crisp frosted details all the way to the highest points of the design, contrasting with watery mirrored prooflike fields. Utterly and completely fully struck, even the finest of die characteristics stand out boldly for examination. Based on the raised die artifacts, this awe-inspiring example was struck during the later production periods, likely in 1784.
(1781) Medal Libertas Americana MS62RB(1781) Medal Libertas Americana MS62RB 528764 (1781) Medal Libertas Americana Bronze MS62RB 1 0 Though bearing the evidence of its share of handling over the centuries, this particular specimen of the Libertas Americana medal is the single earliest example struck in Bronze that this researcher has found. The obverse plainly displays multiple strikings from the dies -- with offsets between strikes -- and yet there is very little evidence of the extensive die damage that is displayed on the vast majority of the Bronze Medals.
(1781) Medal Libertas Americana MS65BN(1781) Medal Libertas Americana MS65BN 151815 (1781) Medal Libertas Americana Bronze MS65BN 4 0 A fanstastically preserved specimen, this gem bronze example of the Libertas Americana Medal is the finest seen by this researcher. Its die state places it near the middle of the production period, with considerable die damage now visible in comparison to the early die state silver and bronze medals in the Collection, yet not so advanced as the very latest die state examples.
1783 Medal Peace of Versailles Betts-608 MS631783 Medal Peace of Versailles Betts-608 MS63 596250 1783 Medal Libertas Americana Betts-608 Silver MS63 1 0 Related to the famous Libertas Americana medals, the Peace of Versailles medal bears the obverse legend of "Libertas Americana." Sometimes also called the "Communi Consensu" medal, this issue commemorates the acceptance of the America's newborn liberty by the "common consent" of the nations of the world. Seen here is a superbly toned example of the medal struck in silver.
1783 Medal Peace of Versailles Betts-608 SP611783 Medal Peace of Versailles Betts-608 SP61 519404 1783 Medal Libertas Americana Betts-608 White Metal SP61 1 0 The "Libertas Americana/Communi Consensu" medal is more commonly seen struck in "white metal" (tin), as seen here. To help preserve the white metal from corrosion, a small plug of copper was inserted in the planchet before striking, allowing the copper plug to absorb any corrosive agents and preserve the rest of the medal.
1792 Medal Maz-318 SP641792 Medal Maz-318 SP64 518892 1792 Medal Maz-318 SP64 1 0 Sometimes referred to as the "French" Libertas medal, this medal commemorates the convention of artists in Lyon in 1792. Clearly, the flowing hair portrait of Liberty and Liberty Cap of the Libertas Americana medal show their influence here.
1792 10C J-10 MS62BN1792 10C J-10 MS62BN 11026 1792 10C J-10 MS62BN 1 0 With the R-6 copper pattern Disme of 1792, we see the direct influence of the famed Libertas Americana medal on the genesis of coinage designs for the new United States Mint. As the Senate and House of Representatives debated back and forth as to coinage designs to be mandated within the "Mint Act," or, more accurately, "An Act Establishing a Mint, and Regulating the Coins of the United States," the Senate was in favor of using the President's portait for circulating coinage. The House of Representatives, though, was steadfast in its resolve that coinage should bear an "image emblematic of Liberty." Ultimately, the Senate accepted the Representatives' resolution, and the Mint Act was signed into law on April 2, 1792. The copper Disme patterns were among the earliest patterns produced for the new coinage of the United States, and from there, the beautiful flowing hair design of the Libertas Americana Medal spread throughout the copper coinage of 1793 through 1797, and the silver coinage of 1794 and 1795.
(1776) Medal Baker-53 Bronze MS65BN(1776) Medal Baker-53 Bronze MS65BN 528670 (1776) Medal Baker-53 Bronze Declaration of Independence MS65BN 1 0 Harkening back to the Nation's beginnings, the mid-19th Century found a resurgence in interest in all things related to George Washington. Revolutionary War era Washington medals and tokens were in high demand, and current artists were re-creating vintage medals and creating new ones. Many of these were far too rare for most collectors to own, and so enterprising craftsmen set about producing facsimiles through the process of electrotyping. New York City's Samuel H. Black proved quite adept at producing worthy replicas of vintage rarities, and he also created his own works of medallic art. In 1859, he created "The National Medallion" that brought together many patriotic themes. Measuring 315mm by 420mm, the Medallion placed George Washington front and center, with the images of the Washington Before Boston medal, and the Signing of the Declaration of Independence, all surrounded by the text of the Declaration (above) and the listing of the Battles of the Revolutionary War (below). Ornamenting the corners are Patriotic Flags, a vigilant Eagle, and at top right, Miss Liberty from the famed Libertas Americana Medal.
(1867) Token Ma-Sp 43 Copper MS66RB(1867) Token Ma-Sp 43 Copper MS66RB 525297 (1867) Token Ma-Sp 43 Copper J.A. Bolen MS66RB 1 0 In the Post-Civil War era, as the once-divided country began to reunite in national patriotism, the image of the Libertas Americana medal again ascended as a national emblem. Medalist and Die Sinker John Adams Bolen created a 25mm die with the Libertas Americana design, to be used for patriotic medals and merchant tokens. Ultimately, this die was paired with 12 different reverse dies, resulting in 12 distinct die varieties. These pieces are all scarce to rare, and may be seen struck in silver, copper, bronze, brass and white metal. Considering the different metals that were used for production, there are a total of 32 die/metal combinations bearing Bolen's Libertas Americana obverse. As seen here, John Adams Bolen chose his Libertas Americana die to use with his own portrait medal -- with this specimen being one of just 16 examples struck in copper.
(1874) Medal Baker-56 Silver MS64(1874) Medal Baker-56 Silver MS64 525295 (1874) Medal Baker-56 Silver Libertas Americana MS64 1 0 Here we see not only one of the very rarest of the Bolen medals, but one of the very rarest of all patriotic medals: the Baker-56 Washington medal (AKA Bolen's JAB-M-4), combining Bolen's Libertas die with his portait of George Washington, with just six such medals struck in silver. This specimen traces its provenance to Neil Musante, the author of the definitive reference of the medallic work of John Adams Bolen.
No Date Token Libertas Americana Mule MS64No Date Token Libertas Americana Mule MS64 525294 No Date Token Judd-391 Bronzed Lead Mule w/Libertas Americana MS64 1 0 A rare and peculiar piece, this token combines Bolen's Libertas Americana die with the J-319 3-Cent pattern die, produced in bronzed lead.
(1876) Token Pa-Ph 502 Brass MS64(1876) Token Pa-Ph 502 Brass MS64 525256 (1876) Token Pa-Ph 502 Brass Wood's Museum MS64 3 0 This advertising token for the Wood's Museum of Philadelphia features Bolen's Libertas Americana die in a scarce striking in Brass.
(1876) Token Pa-Ph 504 White Metal MS64(1876) Token Pa-Ph 504 White Metal MS64 525257 (1876) Token Pa-Ph 504 White Metal Wood's Museum MS64 1 0 With this specimen, we see Bolen's Libertas Americana die in its most widely produced medium -- struck in soft White Metal.
(1876) Token Pa-Ph 256 White Metal MS64(1876) Token Pa-Ph 256 White Metal MS64 525249 (1876) Token Pa-Ph 256 White Metal Lingg & Co. Mule w/Pa-Ph 258 Obv. MS64 1 0 For the United States Centennial celebration in 1876, the Libertas Americana design was once again brought into the spotlight, with the Lingg Brothers of Philadelphia producing their own 23mm Libertas die for patriotic medals and merchant tokens. Aside from its somewhat smaller size, this die is readily distinguished from Bolen's Libertas die by the orientation of Liberty's cap. On the Bolen die, the cap points to the "I" in Americana; whereas on the Lingg die, the cap points to the second "A". Like the Bolen die, the Lingg die was used to strike medals and tokens with an assortment of reverse dies in a variety of metals. All totalled, this Libertas Americana die was paired with 67 different reverse dies, resulting in 152 known die/metal combinations. Here we see the the Libertas Americana die paired with a Liberty Bell die, creating a patriotic medal purely in commemoration of the Centennial.
(1876) Token NY-NY 780A Copper MS65RD(1876) Token NY-NY 780A Copper MS65RD 525335 (1876) Token NY-NY 780A Copper Geo. E. Phelan MS65RD 1 0 Apart from the patriotic medals, the Lingg Brothers used their Libertas Americana die in commerical production, creating advertising tokens for numerous merchants. Here we see the Geo. E. Phelan merchant token struck in copper, and still fully Mint Red!
(1876) Token NY-NY 720AA Bronze MS65BN(1876) Token NY-NY 720AA Bronze MS65BN 525307 (1876) Token NY-NY 720AA Bronze Frederick's Pharmacy MS65BN 1 0 With this Lingg token produced for Fredericks Pharmacy of New York, we see the 23mm Libertas die in its scarcest format -- struck in Bronze.
(1876) Token NY-NY 810A Brass MS65(1876) Token NY-NY 810A Brass MS65 525364 (1876) Token NY-NY 810A Brass Geo. P. Rowell & Co. MS65 1 0 This merchant token was produced for the Geo. P. Rowell & Co. Newspaper company of New York. While these Rowell tokens are fairly available in the common "white metal" (tin), they are truly rare in the Brass composition seen here. Indeed, this particular specimen has been highly prized for generations, having been featured in the collections of FCC Boyd, John J. Ford, and Stephen Tanenbaum.
(1876) Token NY-NY 740 White Metal MS65(1876) Token NY-NY 740 White Metal MS65 525317 (1876) Token NY-NY 740 White Metal T. Hoag MS65 1 0 White metal strikings of the various merchant tokens are the most commonly seen, and decidedly the most common of the Libertas Americana tokens. White metal is quite soft and easily impressed by the dies, and this sometimes results in a highly reflective prooflike surface -- as seen here with the Libertas token for T. Hoag Watches of New York.
(1876) Token NY-NY 860 White Metal AU58(1876) Token NY-NY 860 White Metal AU58 525384 (1876) Token NY-NY 860 White Metal Traphagen, Hunter & Co. AU58 1 0 The third known Libertas Americana token obverse die is seen here. An odd rarity among the Libertas Americana tokens, this obverse die displays a very uniform denticulated border, but a rather crude portrait of Liberty. One might call this the "apprentice die," as it appears to have been made by someone still learning their craft. Raised guidelines can been seen framing the denticulation and legend, to ensure their proper placement and uniformity, but it would seem that the portrait was executed freehand. This third Libertas obverse die is only known in combination with this particular Traphagen Hunter reverse die, and is seen only in white metal and brass.
(1876) Token NY-NY 860J Brass MS63(1876) Token NY-NY 860J Brass MS63 525385 (1876) Token NY-NY 860J Brass Traphagen, Hunter & Co. MS63 1 0 Here again is the "apprentice" die of the Libertas Americana token, this time seen in its rarest composition in Brass. With its provenance tracing to Stephen Tanenbaum, this specimen is the sole known brass striking of the token.
1945 Medal U.S. Assay Commission, JK-AC-90 SP651945 Medal U.S. Assay Commission, JK-AC-90 SP65 517775 1945 Medal JK-AC-90 Bronze Annual Assay Commission SP65 1 0 With the Libertas Americana medal serving to commemorate the American victory in the Revolutionary War and the peace that followed, the U.S. Mint revisited that theme for the American victory in World War II in 1945 for its Annual Assay Commission medal. Here the Mint chose to make the medal a truly American commemoration, by replacing the reverse design with the Great Seal of the United States, as seen on Washington's Diplomatic Medal.
1976 Medal Libertas Americana Silver - Copy of Orig Design MS671976 Medal Libertas Americana Silver - Copy of Orig Design MS67 509899 1976 Medal Libertas Am. Silver Copy of Original Design MS67 1 0 During a visit to the Paris Mint in 1958, John J. Ford re-discovered the previously lost original dies for the Libertas Americana Medal in the Mint's Museum "Musee de Monnaies." As the U.S. Bicentennial grew nearer, he suggested to Stanley Applebaum of First Coinvestors that transfer dies be created for a bicentennial commemorative restriking. First Coinvestors funded the project, in exchange for the exclusive rights of the new dies. The dies were expanded to a diameter of 77mm, and the dates were changed on the obverse and reverse dies. Further markings were added to the edge, to designate the restrikes as "COPY OF DESIGN BY BENJAMIN FRANKLIN - ORIGINAL STRUCK IN 1783". Just 500 examples were struck in silver, as in the specimen seen here. Records report that 3 examples were also struck in gold (likely .920 fineness), but none are known today. Presumably, melted for their high bullion value during 1980.
1976 Medal Libertas Am. Brass MS651976 Medal Libertas Am. Brass MS65 527124 1976 Medal Libertas Am. Brass Copy of Original Design MS65 1 0 Prior to the striking of the planned production run of 500 silver medals for First Coinvestors, the Paris Mint tested the dies by producing 5 trial strikes in bronze, as seen here. Clearly, these were executed in brass or "yellow bronze," in keeping with U.S. Mint trends during the latter 20th Century. A careful comparison of the brass specimen with the silver examples confirms its trial strike status, as it displays a definitively earlier die state than seen on the silver medals.
1983 Medal Libertas Americana Bronze - Copy of Orig Design MS68BN1983 Medal Libertas Americana Bronze - Copy of Orig Design MS68BN 518943 1983 Medal Libertas Am. Bronze Copy of Original Design MS68BN 1 0 A further extension of First Coinvestors rights to the new 77mm Libertas dies, bronze "Copies" such as this one were struck in 1983 for the Bicentennial. Whereas the 1976 Silver "Copies" celebrated the bicentennial of the signing of the Declaration of Independence, these 1983 Medals were dated "1783 3 SEPT 1983", to commemorate the bicentennial of the signing of the Peace Treaty that ended the Revolutionary War.
(1776) Medal Libertas Americana Silver MS63(1776) Medal Libertas Americana Silver MS63 597454 (1776) Medal Libertas Am. Silver 1980s Restrike MS63 2 0 While the Paris Mint may have given First Coinvestors the exclusive rights to the 77mm dies, it reserved for itself the rights to restrike the Libertas Americana medals in other sizes, and a number of restrikes have appeared since that time. The Silver Restrike seen here was produced in an open issue for visitors to the Mint beginning shortly after the U.S. Bicentennial. These are distinguished by a double cornucopia edge mark and a stamp of ".925" to designate the fineness of the silver. Similarly, Bronze Restrikes were also produced in open issue and bear edge markings to designate their official Paris Mint origin.
(1776) Medal Libertas Americana AE MS65BN(1776) Medal Libertas Americana AE MS65BN 597455 (1776) Medal Libertas Americana AE Paris Mint 1980's Restrike MS65BN 3 0 In addition to the open issue silver restrikes, Bronze Restrikes were also produced by the Paris Mint in an open issue following the U.S. Bicentennial. These bear edge markings to designate their official Paris Mint origin.
(1776) Medal Libertas Americana Silver - 2000 Restrike MS65(1776) Medal Libertas Americana Silver - 2000 Restrike MS65 510012 (1776) Medal Libertas Am. Silver 2000 Restrike MS65 1 0 The Silver Restrike seen here was issued for the New Millenium in 2000 in a limited edition of 2500 pieces, each 45.86mm in diameter and containing 42.80 grams of .950 silver. For this issue, the Paris Mint used the same dies that had been used to produce the earlier Bronze restrikes sold to Mint visitors.
(1776) Medal Libertas Americana Gold - 2000 Restrike PR69DC(1776) Medal Libertas Americana Gold - 2000 Restrike PR69DC 511938 (1776) Medal Libertas Americana Gold 2000 Restrike 64g. Au PR69DC 4 0 As a companion to the 2000 Silver Restrike, the Paris Mint also issued a Restrike in Gold, as seen here. The Gold restrikes were produced at a diameter of 46.80mm, and contain 64 grams of .920 gold. Just 500 pieces were struck in gold, yet a careful examination shows that 4 separate pairs of dies were used to complete their production.
(1776) Medal Libertas Americana Silver - 2004 Restrike PR69DC(1776) Medal Libertas Americana Silver - 2004 Restrike PR69DC 510007 (1776) Medal Libertas Am. Silver 2004 Restrike PR69DC 38 0 Clearly, the Paris Mint found a favorable reception for the Libertas Americana Medals it produced during 2000, and so further restrikes were executed in 2004 with greater mintages. The 2004 Silver Libertas Americana Medals, as seen here, were produced to the extent of 15,000 pieces -- all in Deep Cameo Proof format, each 40mm in diameter and containing 24 grams of .999 silver. The new 40mm size of these silver restrikes was the smallest ever issued by the Paris Mint up until that point; however, that size makes them a perfect fit for display in dual-coin holders, allowing both the obverse and reverse to be viewed simultaneously.
(1776) Medal Libertas Americana Gold - 2004 Restrike PR69DC(1776) Medal Libertas Americana Gold - 2004 Restrike PR69DC(1776) Medal Libertas Americana Gold - 2004 Restrike PR69DC 515264 (1776) Medal Libertas Americana Gold 2004 Restrike 43g. PR69DC 1 0 The Gold Libertas Americana Medal restrikes issued in 2004 came from the same 40mm dies as the 2004 Silver restrikes, and were executed in Deep Cameo format as well. Containing 43 grams of .999 gold, the 2004 Gold restrikes are a bit smaller than those produced during 2000. These can be easily distinguished from their 2000 counterparts by the presence of the Paris Mint's markings near the lower rim of the reverse, something not seen on the 2000 restrikes. Like the DCAM silver restrikes, the 40mm size of these gold restrikes make them suitable for display in dual-coin holders, with both obverse and reverse presented side-by-side. Just 1776 gold restrikes were produced from these dies.
(1776) Medal Libertas Americana Silver - 2005 Restrike MS64(1776) Medal Libertas Americana Silver - 2005 Restrike MS64 510008 (1776) Medal Libertas Americana Ag 2005 Restrike MS64 1 0 While the production quality of the Deep Cameo proof restrikes of 2004 was exceptional, the Paris Mint's follow-up in 2005 did not match that standard. Talisman Coin Company, an official distributor of Monnaie de Paris products, contracted with the Mint to produce circulation-strike examples of the Libertas Americana medals in both Silver and Bronze, with no mintage limits for either. These were intended to be retailed at a lower price point, and thus it appears that production standards were relaxed to facilitate that. Using the worn dies from the 1980's production of silver restrikes as the model, these new restrikes were produced at a 50mm diameter with 60 grams of .950 silver. The 2005 Silver Libertas Americana restrike seen here is precisely in the condition it left the Paris Mint and is the single finest known by a wide margin; yet, its softened details and finely granular surface (as in all examples seen) merits only the grade of MS64.
(1776) Medal Libertas Americana Bronze - 2005 Restrike MS64RB(1776) Medal Libertas Americana Bronze - 2005 Restrike MS64RB 510010 (1776) Medal Libertas Americana AE 2005 Restrike MS64RB 1 0 As with the 2005 Silver Libertas Americana restrikes, the 2005 Bronze restrikes feature softened details and finely granular surfaces, these produced at a 47mm size from 57 grams of pure bronze. Like its Silver counterpart in the Collection, the Bronze example seen here is precisely in the condition it left the Paris Mint and the single finest known; yet, it merits only the grade of MS64RB.
(1776) Medal Libertas Americana Silver - 2014 Restrike PR70DC(1776) Medal Libertas Americana Silver - 2014 Restrike PR70DC 530830 (1776) Medal Libertas Am. Silver 2014 Restrike PR70DC 10 0 Commemorating the 230th anniversary of the ratification of the Peace Treaty between the United States and Great Britain, the Paris Mint once again created a new issue of Libertas Americana medals. Based on the original highly detailed dies, new dies were sculpted to present the medal in an extremely high relief format. Designed to a 50mm format, these are the largest and heaviest of all of the Libertas Americana medal retrikes up to that time, aside from the First Coinvestors Bicentennial issues. The silver restrike seen here is made of 163.80 grams of .950 fineness silver, with a mintage limited to 10,000 pieces. Close in diameter to the 18th Century original medals, these are very thick and approximately 3 times as heavy.
(1776) Medal Libertas Am. Gold, 2014 Restrike 5 oz PR70DC(1776) Medal Libertas Am. Gold, 2014 Restrike 5 oz PR70DC 612317 (1776) Medal Libertas Am. Gold 2014 5 oz. Restrike PR70DC 7 0 The 2014 edition of the Libertas Americana Medal was also issued in .999 pure gold. At 50mm diameter, with an edition limit of 1,000 pieces, these medals contain 155.50 grams (5 troy ounces) of pure gold -- nearly double that of the original gold medals presented to King Louis XVI and Queen Maria Antoinette on April 8, 1783.
(1776) Medal Libertas Americana Gold - 2014 Restrike PR70DC(1776) Medal Libertas Americana Gold - 2014 Restrike PR70DC 535425 (1776) Medal Libertas Am. Gold 2014 1 oz. Restrike PR70DC 3 0 In addition to the stunning 5oz/50mm silver and gold restrikes, the Paris Mint also produced high relief gold Libertas Americana medals in a one troy ounce format, with a mintage limit of 5,000 pieces. With the diameter reduced to 34mm, but still containing a 31.104 grams of .999 gold, these are the smallest in diameter of all of the official Mint restrikes, but still very impressive in hand.
(1776) Medal Libertas Americana - 2015 Ag Restrike PR69DC(1776) Medal Libertas Americana - 2015 Ag Restrike PR69DC(1776) Medal Libertas Americana - 2015 Ag Restrike PR69DC 606467 (1776) Medal Libertas Americana Ag 2015 Restrike - 1 oz. PR69DC 10 0 The Monnaie de Paris released further silver editions in 2015, with much more modest mintages. Seen here is the Libertas Americana medal rendered in a 37mm format, bearing 31.1g of .950 silver. Whereas the 2014 silver issue was minted to a limit of 10,000 pieces, these 2015 1oz medals were limited to 5,000 pieces.
(1776) Medal Libertas Am. 1 Kilo Silver PR70DC(1776) Medal Libertas Am. 1 Kilo Silver PR70DC 606226 (1776) Medal Libertas Am. 1 Kilo Ag 2015 Restrike PR70DC 3 0 Undoubtedly, the largest format ever issued for the Libertas Americana medals were released in 2015. Weighing in at 1 full kilogram of .999 silver, these restrikes command attention with their 100mm diameters -- readily dwarfing the Coinvestors Bicentennial issue. As a testament to Paris Mint standards, sufficient care was taken that the example in the collection fully merits its PR70DCAM rating from PCGS! Production of this massive issue was limited to just 1,000 pieces. While that may seem like a small number, their production required one full metric ton of pure silver!