1694 1/2 P Carolina PROPRIETORS O/E, BN (Regular Strike)

Series: U.S. Colonial Issues

PCGS MS63BN

PCGS MS63BN

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PCGS AU53BN

PCGS AU53BN

PCGS XF45BN

PCGS XF45BN

PCGS #:
73
Designer:
N/A
Edge:
N/A
Diameter:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Mintage:
N/A
Mint:
Philadelphia
Metal:
Copper
Major Varieties

Current Auctions - PCGS Graded
Current Auctions - NGC Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - PCGS Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - NGC Graded

Condition Census What Is This?

Pos Grade Image Pedigree and History
1 MS62BN PCGS grade
2 AU53 PCGS grade
3 XF45 PCGS grade
4 VF30 PCGS grade

Stack’s 9/2009:4005, $28,750

4 VF30 PCGS grade
6 VF25 PCGS grade
6 VF25 PCGS grade
8 VF20 PCGS grade

Stack’s “Gilbert Steinberg” 10/1989:49 - John “Jack” Royse Collection - Stack’s/Bowers 11/2012:6016, $23,000

8 VF20 PCGS grade

Heritage 10/2010:3022, $17,825

8 VF20 PCGS grade
#1 MS62BN PCGS grade
#2 AU53 PCGS grade
#3 XF45 PCGS grade
#4 VF30 PCGS grade

Stack’s 9/2009:4005, $28,750

#4 VF30 PCGS grade
#6 VF25 PCGS grade
#6 VF25 PCGS grade
#8 VF20 PCGS grade

Stack’s “Gilbert Steinberg” 10/1989:49 - John “Jack” Royse Collection - Stack’s/Bowers 11/2012:6016, $23,000

#8 VF20 PCGS grade

Heritage 10/2010:3022, $17,825

#8 VF20 PCGS grade
Ron Guth:

The 1694 Elephant Tokens are among the most popular U.S. Colonial coins because of their theme and rarity. No other American coins feature an elephant, so collectors of colonial coins are naturally inclined toward them. Based on the size of the ear, the elephant appears to be of the African variety. Unfortunately, no records exist to explain why the elephant was used on a coin tied to the American colonies.

The 1694 Elephant Tokens come in two versions: one with PROPRIETERS on the reverse (a mis-spelling) and another with the word corrected to PROPRIETORS by punching an O over the E (the undertype is always visible).

The PROPRIETORS O/E variety is very rare. The cataloger of the Ford Collection thought he had seen fewer than a dozen examples, but we have images of seventeen different examples (as of April 2017) and there are doubtless a few more "out there." Most are either low grade or have endured indignities such as pitting, cleaning, or planchet flaws. We know of two Mint State examples, including a PCGS MS62BN and an even better example from the Garrett Collection (reportedly now in the Donald Partrick Collection).