1792 10C J-10, BN (Special Strike)

Series: (None)

PCGS SP62BN

PCGS SP62BN

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PCGS SP58+BN

PCGS SP58+BN

PCGS SP55BN

PCGS SP55BN

PCGS #:
11026
Designer:
Henry Voight
Edge:
Reeded
Diameter:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Mintage:
N/A
Mint:
Philadelphia
Metal:
Copper
Major Varieties

Current Auctions - PCGS Graded
Current Auctions - NGC Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - PCGS Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - NGC Graded

Condition Census What Is This?

Pos Grade Image Pedigree and History
1 MS64BN estimated grade

Mint Collection - National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution (accession #1991.0357.0122)

2 MS62BN PCGS grade

Dr. J. Hewitt Judd Collection - Abe Kosoff “Illustrated History of United States Coins FPL” 1962, lot 14 - Stuart Levine, sold privately on 3/26/2001 - Ed Price Collection - Heritage 7/2009:1406, $690,000 - Greensboro Collection - Heritage 10/2012:3873, $587,500

3 AU58 PCGS grade
4 AU55 PCGS grade

Eric P. Newman Numismatic Education Society - Heritage 5/2014:30427, $499,375

4 AU55 PCGS grade

Hollinbeck Coin and Stamp Company 7/1954:964 - Norweb Family Collection - Bowers & Merena 11/1988:3391 - Stack’s/Bowers 8/2011:7481 (as PCGS AU55 11607600), $362,250

6 AU50 PCGS grade

Liberty Collection - Heritage 8/2015:3986, $182,125

7 XF45 PCGS grade

Goldbergs 2/2001:152 (as PCGS XF45), $109,250

7 XF45 PCGS grade
9 XF40 PCGS grade

Carl Wurtzbach (exhibited at ANS Exhibition of United States and Colonial Coins, 1914, plate VI) - Sol Kaplan - Phillip E. Benedetti - Gary Fitzgerald, sold privately on 6/27/1968 for $7,500 - Donald Groves Partrick Collection - Heritage 1/2015:5509, $211,500 - Heritage 9/2015:3798, $211,500

10 VF25 PCGS grade

Superior 2/1997:2646 - Superior 5/2001:1046 - American Numismatic Rarities 3/2006:37, $87,400 - Stack's/Bowers 2/2014:2002, $211,500 - Stack's/Bowers 8/2016:3012

#1 MS64BN estimated grade

Mint Collection - National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution (accession #1991.0357.0122)

#2 MS62BN PCGS grade

Dr. J. Hewitt Judd Collection - Abe Kosoff “Illustrated History of United States Coins FPL” 1962, lot 14 - Stuart Levine, sold privately on 3/26/2001 - Ed Price Collection - Heritage 7/2009:1406, $690,000 - Greensboro Collection - Heritage 10/2012:3873, $587,500

#3 AU58 PCGS grade
#4 AU55 PCGS grade

Eric P. Newman Numismatic Education Society - Heritage 5/2014:30427, $499,375

#4 AU55 PCGS grade

Hollinbeck Coin and Stamp Company 7/1954:964 - Norweb Family Collection - Bowers & Merena 11/1988:3391 - Stack’s/Bowers 8/2011:7481 (as PCGS AU55 11607600), $362,250

#6 AU50 PCGS grade

Liberty Collection - Heritage 8/2015:3986, $182,125

#7 XF45 PCGS grade

Goldbergs 2/2001:152 (as PCGS XF45), $109,250

#7 XF45 PCGS grade
#9 XF40 PCGS grade

Carl Wurtzbach (exhibited at ANS Exhibition of United States and Colonial Coins, 1914, plate VI) - Sol Kaplan - Phillip E. Benedetti - Gary Fitzgerald, sold privately on 6/27/1968 for $7,500 - Donald Groves Partrick Collection - Heritage 1/2015:5509, $211,500 - Heritage 9/2015:3798, $211,500

#10 VF25 PCGS grade

Superior 2/1997:2646 - Superior 5/2001:1046 - American Numismatic Rarities 3/2006:37, $87,400 - Stack's/Bowers 2/2014:2002, $211,500 - Stack's/Bowers 8/2016:3012

P. Scott Rubin: The 1792 Copper Disme with Reeded Edge, Judd-10 is a Rarity 6 coin (13-30 known), making this issue the second most common of the rare 1792 coinage varieties. The much more common 1792 Silver Half Disme, a coin with over two hundred specimens known was struck in the metal of a circulation strike and many believe it was issued for circulation. However, the 1792 Disme does not appear to have ever been issued for circulation and was a pattern-only issue. It is somewhat surprising then that so many of the Copper Dismes were struck. It is also surprising that approximately two-thirds of the surviving 1792 Copper Dismes with Reeded Edge are known in Very Fine condition or better. Three of the survivors are graded either Proof or Specimen Issues.

It seems probable that 1792 Copper Dismes with Reeded Edge were given to a number of people to display as an example of the proposed coinage of the U.S. That would explain the Specimen specimens and helps explain why so many survive in nice condition. While it is not definitely known who engraved these coins, it appears that they were not engraved by Birch (who did the 1792 Birch Cents) and they were not engraved by Joseph Wright (who engraved the 1792 Pattern Quarter).

Besides the two identified as Specimen issues, which are graded SP65 Brown and SP55 by PCGS, and one Proof graded PR62BN by NGC, there are two 1792 Copper Dismes with Reeded Edge with claims to Uncirculated condition. Since Proof coinage was not officially started at the U.S. Mint until about 1817, it is probably more accurate to call any coin that appears to be a proof struck before that date a Specimen.