1792 25C J-12, BN (Special Strike)

Series: (None)

PCGS #:
11033
Designer:
Joseph Wright
Edge:
Reeded
Diameter:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Mintage:
N/A
Mint:
Philadelphia
Metal:
Copper
Major Varieties

Current Auctions - PCGS Graded
Current Auctions - NGC Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - PCGS Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - NGC Graded

Condition Census What Is This?

Pos Grade Image Pedigree and History
1 MS62 estimated grade

Edward Cogan 4/1863:1074 - Charles I. Bushnell Collection - S.H. & H. Chapman 6/1882:1764 - Lorin G. Parmelee Collection - New York Coin & Stamp 6/1890:9 - H.P. Smith - DeWitt Smith - Virgil M. Brand (journal #46508) - J. Hewitt Judd - Abe Kosoff (Illustrated History) 1962:15 - Donald Groves Partrick Collection - Heritage 1/2015:5511, $2,232,500

#1 MS62 estimated grade

Edward Cogan 4/1863:1074 - Charles I. Bushnell Collection - S.H. & H. Chapman 6/1882:1764 - Lorin G. Parmelee Collection - New York Coin & Stamp 6/1890:9 - H.P. Smith - DeWitt Smith - Virgil M. Brand (journal #46508) - J. Hewitt Judd - Abe Kosoff (Illustrated History) 1962:15 - Donald Groves Partrick Collection - Heritage 1/2015:5511, $2,232,500

David Hall:

There are two known specimens and both are fairly nice Uncs. One specimen is Ex-Bushnell-Parmelee-Brand-Dr.Judd, and the other is in the Smithsonian.

Ron Guth:

This delicate design type is extremely rare and is represented by only two examples in Copper. The reverse features a border of 87 tiny stars (apart from the 1794 "Starred Reverse" Cent, this is the only time such a border was used on an American coin). The example from the National Numismatic Collection was used to illustrate the type in Judd's Pattern book. A second example (ex Bushnell - Parmelee - Brand - Dr. Judd) is said to have a "shattered" reverse die, although no breaks are visible on the coin illustrated in Breen.

See also: Four trial pieces were struck in white metal (Judd 13). Unique, uniface examples exist in white metal of both the obverse and the reverse.

Sources and/or recommended reading: "United States Pattern, Experimental and Trial Pieces" by J. Hewitt Judd, M.D.

"Walter Breen's Complete Encyclopedia of United States and Colonial Coins" by Walter Breen

"The U.S. Mint and Coinage" by Don Taxay

P. Scott Rubin: The 1792 Quarter Dollar struck in copper (Judd-12) is represented today by only two specimens. One is currently in the Smithsonian collection the other is in a privately owned Eastern United States collection. Both coins are estimated by PCGS to be in MS-64 Brown condition.

This issue is also known stuck in white metal. These were struck as patterns and these quarter issues are unique for the 1792 issues, in that so many stages of the preparation of the coins are known. The first stage is unique uniface white metal strikes of the obverse and reverse dies. Second are white metal strikes (two known) without the use of a collar. The third stage are white metal specimens (two known) struck with a collar and lastly the copper specimens (two known) struck with a collar. No specimens are known in silver which would have been the metal for a circulating quarter and it was not until 1796 when a regular issue coin of this denomination was issued.

This coin was designed and engraved by Joseph Wright, George Washington’s choice for the position of 1st Chief Engraver of the Mint, however he died in 1793 before the appoint was approved. The person whose image is represented as Miss. Liberty on the obverse of this coin is believed to be Joseph Wright’s wife. The hair style and profile of this wife match her image from Joseph Wright’s last painted family portrait done the year of his death.

Neither of the two known 1792 Quarter Dollars struck in copper have sold publicly in recent history and with only one in private hands, when and if it is sold this specimen should sell well into the seven figure price range.