1794 1C No Fraction Bar, RB (Regular Strike)

Series: Liberty Cap Cents 1793-1796

PCGS MS64RB

PCGS MS64RB

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PCGS #:
911375
Designer:
Attributed to Robert Scot
Edge:
Lettered: ONE HUNDRED FOR A DOLLAR
Diameter:
28.00 millimeters
Weight:
13.48 grams
Mintage:
918,521
Mint:
Philadelphia
Metal:
Copper
Current Auctions - PCGS Graded
Current Auctions - NGC Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - PCGS Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - NGC Graded

Rarity and Survival Estimates Learn More

Grades Survival
Estimate
Numismatic
Rarity
Relative Rarity
By Type
Relative Rarity
By Series
All Grades 2 R-9.9 1 / 5 TIE 1 / 6 TIE
60 or Better 2 R-9.9 1 / 5 TIE 1 / 6 TIE
65 or Better 1 R-10.0 1 / 5 TIE 1 / 6 TIE
Survival Estimate
All Grades 2
60 or Better 2
65 or Better 1
Numismatic Rarity
All Grades R-9.9
60 or Better R-9.9
65 or Better R-10.0
Relative Rarity By Type All Specs in this Type
All Grades 1 / 5 TIE
60 or Better 1 / 5 TIE
65 or Better 1 / 5 TIE
Relative Rarity By Series All Specs in this Series
All Grades 1 / 6 TIE
60 or Better 1 / 6 TIE
65 or Better 1 / 6 TIE
Ron Guth:

Engraver errors are among the most popular of all varieties. As opposed to errors in the minting process (for example, off-center strikes, blank planchets, brockages, etc.), engraver errors are simply goofs made by the person preparing the die. Examples of engraver errors include overdates, misplaced dates, an incorrect number of stars, misspellings, etc.). One of the more interesting engraver errors among 1794 Large Cents is the No Fraction Bar variety. In this case, the engraver omitted completely the dividing bar of the 1/100 fraction on the reverse. This error occurred on only one variety of the year (Sheldon-64), so the engraver gets some credit for getting it right on the many other varieties of 1794.

The No Fraction Bar is a fairly scarce variety, and one that is desirable in virtually every grade. One of the best certified examples is a PCGS MS64RB that shows nearly 25% of the original red color -- a very unusual situation on any early U.S. Large Cent.

By the way, the name for the dividing bar in a fraction is "vinculum."