1795 50C Overton 123 (Regular Strike)

Series: Flowing Hair Half Dollars 1794-1795

PCGS VG8

PCGS VG8

PCGS #:
39239
Designer:
Robert Scot
Edge:
Lettered: FIFTY CENTS OR HALF A DOLLAR
Diameter:
32.50 millimeters
Weight:
13.48 grams
Mintage:
299,680
Mint:
Philadelphia
Metal:
90% Silver, 10% Copper
Current Auctions - PCGS Graded
Current Auctions - NGC Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - PCGS Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - NGC Graded

Condition Census What Is This?

Pos Grade Image Pedigree and History
1 MS64 estimated grade

Stack's 1/1992:571 - Stack's 11/1994:873 - American Numismatic Rarities 7/2005:1146, not sold

2 EF40 estimated grade
3 VF35 estimated grade
4 VF30 PCGS grade

J.J. Teaparty, sold privately in 3/1985 - Jules Reiver Collection - Heritage 1/2006:22503, $18,400 - Stack’s 1/2009:397, $20,700

5 VF30 estimated grade (XF details, bent)

Alpine Coins, sold privately in 8/1977 - Bayside New York Collection - Heritage 7/2008:389, $6,325

6 VF25 estimated grade

Michael Summers, sold privately in 1/2004 - Westmoreland County Collection - Heritage 1/2008:2844, $25,300

#1 MS64 estimated grade

Stack's 1/1992:571 - Stack's 11/1994:873 - American Numismatic Rarities 7/2005:1146, not sold

#2 EF40 estimated grade
#3 VF35 estimated grade
#4 VF30 PCGS grade

J.J. Teaparty, sold privately in 3/1985 - Jules Reiver Collection - Heritage 1/2006:22503, $18,400 - Stack’s 1/2009:397, $20,700

#5 VF30 estimated grade (XF details, bent)

Alpine Coins, sold privately in 8/1977 - Bayside New York Collection - Heritage 7/2008:389, $6,325

#6 VF25 estimated grade

Michael Summers, sold privately in 1/2004 - Westmoreland County Collection - Heritage 1/2008:2844, $25,300

Ron Guth:

The O-123 1795 Half Dollar is the second or third rarest die variety of the year (a lot depends on whether the O-118 actually exists). Estimates of the surviving population range from nine to twelve examples. In his Spring 2015 listing, Steve Herrman shows 11 appearance of O-123 and O-123a, though there are some duplcations there.

O-123 is rare because of the early failure of the reverse die which quickly cracked through the final S of STATES through OF, eventually leading to a chunk of the die falling off, rendering it useless (Heritage 1/2008:1339 shos this massive failure).

Most examples of the 1795 O-123 variety are low grade or impaired. There is one standout, however -- an NGC MS65 that last appeared on the market in 2005.