PCGS: The Standard for the Rare Coin Industry

1796 $2.50 No Stars (Regular Strike)

Series: Draped Bust $2 1/2 1796-1807

PCGS MS62+

PCGS MS62+

PCGS MS62

PCGS MS62

PCGS MS61

PCGS MS61

PCGS #:
7645
Designer:
Robert Scot
Edge:
Reeded
Diameter:
20.00 millimeters
Weight:
4.37 grams
Mintage:
963
Metal:
91.7% Gold, 8.3% Copper
Major Varieties

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Rarity and Survival Estimates Learn More

Grades Survival
Estimate
Numismatic
Rarity
Relative Rarity
By Type
Relative Rarity
By Series
All Grades 88 R-8.1 1 / 1 8 / 12
60 or Better 8 R-9.6 1 / 1 5 / 12 TIE
65 or Better 1 R-10.0 1 / 1 1 / 12 TIE
Survival Estimate
All Grades 88
60 or Better 8
65 or Better 1
Numismatic Rarity
All Grades R-8.1
60 or Better R-9.6
65 or Better R-10.0
Relative Rarity By Type All Specs in this Type
All Grades 1 / 1
60 or Better 1 / 1
65 or Better 1 / 1
Relative Rarity By Series All Specs in this Series
All Grades 8 / 12
60 or Better 5 / 12 TIE
65 or Better 1 / 12 TIE

Condition Census What Is This?

Pos Grade Image Pedigree and History
1 MS65 PCGS grade

Lorin Parmelee Collection - New York Coin and Stamp Co. 6/1890:719 - Col. Robert C.H. Brock Collection - University of Pennsylvania - Philip H. Ward, Jr. Collection - Stack's 5/1964:1660, $7,750 - Lelan Rogers Collection - Stack’s “Numisma '95” 11/1995:1498, $605,000 - American Numismatic Rarities 6/2005:1002, $1,380,000 -  Madison Collection - Heritage 1/2008:3058, $1,725,000

2 MS64 estimated grade
3 MS62+ PCGS grade

James Swan Collection - American Numismatic Rarities 7/2004:82, $345,000 - Stack's 7/2008:2324, $488,750 - Bob R. Simpson Collection

3 MS62 PCGS grade

Harold P. Newlin, sold privately on 10/31/1884 - T. Harrison Garrett Collection - Robert Garrett Collection - John Works Garrett Collection - Johns Hopkins University Collection - Bowers & Ruddy 3/1980:732, $125,000 - Ed Hipps, sold privately - John Walter Whitney Collection - Stack's 5/1999:1787, $299,000 - D. Brent Pogue Collection - Stack’s/Bowers & Sotheby’s 5/2015:1116, $822,500

3 MS62 PCGS grade
3 MS62 estimated grade

Heritage 1/2004:3004 (as NGC MS62 695929-001), $138,000 - Offered by MikeByers.com at the 2/2012 Long Beach show for $750,000 - Heritage 8/2012:5281, $252,625

3 MS62 estimated grade

Superior 3/2000:712, $178,250 - Freedom Collection - Heritage 1/2007:3380, $287,500

3 MS62 estimated grade

National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution

9 MS61 PCGS grade PCGS #7645 (MS)     61

High Desert Collection (PCGS Set Registry)

9 MS61 PCGS grade  
	MS61 PCGS grade

James A. Stack, Sr. Collection - Stack's 10/1994:829, $82,500 - Alpine Zephyr Collection - Heritage 8/2006:5417, $322,000 - Werner Family Collection - Stack's/Bowers 8/2012:11174, $411,250 - Cardinal Collection Educational Foundation - Stack's/Bowers & Sotheby's 10/2015:55, $352,500

#1 MS65 PCGS grade

Lorin Parmelee Collection - New York Coin and Stamp Co. 6/1890:719 - Col. Robert C.H. Brock Collection - University of Pennsylvania - Philip H. Ward, Jr. Collection - Stack's 5/1964:1660, $7,750 - Lelan Rogers Collection - Stack’s “Numisma '95” 11/1995:1498, $605,000 - American Numismatic Rarities 6/2005:1002, $1,380,000 -  Madison Collection - Heritage 1/2008:3058, $1,725,000

#2 MS64 estimated grade
#3 MS62+ PCGS grade

James Swan Collection - American Numismatic Rarities 7/2004:82, $345,000 - Stack's 7/2008:2324, $488,750 - Bob R. Simpson Collection

#3 MS62 PCGS grade

Harold P. Newlin, sold privately on 10/31/1884 - T. Harrison Garrett Collection - Robert Garrett Collection - John Works Garrett Collection - Johns Hopkins University Collection - Bowers & Ruddy 3/1980:732, $125,000 - Ed Hipps, sold privately - John Walter Whitney Collection - Stack's 5/1999:1787, $299,000 - D. Brent Pogue Collection - Stack’s/Bowers & Sotheby’s 5/2015:1116, $822,500

#3 MS62 PCGS grade
#3 MS62 estimated grade

Heritage 1/2004:3004 (as NGC MS62 695929-001), $138,000 - Offered by MikeByers.com at the 2/2012 Long Beach show for $750,000 - Heritage 8/2012:5281, $252,625

#3 MS62 estimated grade

Superior 3/2000:712, $178,250 - Freedom Collection - Heritage 1/2007:3380, $287,500

#3 MS62 estimated grade

National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution

PCGS #7645 (MS)     61 #9 MS61 PCGS grade

High Desert Collection (PCGS Set Registry)

 
	MS61 PCGS grade 
#9 MS61 PCGS grade

James A. Stack, Sr. Collection - Stack's 10/1994:829, $82,500 - Alpine Zephyr Collection - Heritage 8/2006:5417, $322,000 - Werner Family Collection - Stack's/Bowers 8/2012:11174, $411,250 - Cardinal Collection Educational Foundation - Stack's/Bowers & Sotheby's 10/2015:55, $352,500

Ron Guth:

The 1796 Quarter Eagle with No Stars on the obverse is one of the most historic and important U.S. gold coins. The mintage is a mere 963 pieces, which is exceedingly small by any standard. Estimates of the number of surviving examples has ranged all over the place. David Akers claimed 30 to 40, refuting earlier claims of 15 to 20 known. The cataloger at Heritage estimated 80 to 100 in their January 2007 sale. PCGS experts estimate a surviving population of 100 to 125 pieces. To put a finer spin on things, we have images of 28 different examples, all in AU or better. Eleven of those examples are Mint State 60 or better. At the top of the condition census is the incredible PCGS MS65 (finest by two full points) that sold for $1,725,000 in January 2008.

It is very difficult to locate a "perfect" 1796 No Stars Quarter Eagle. Many show lintmarks of various sizes. Some show adjustment marks, usually in the center of the obverse. The Bass:261 coin (now in an NGC MS60 holder) shows three different, mint-caused defects: a diagonal fissure running from the turban to Liberty's temple; vertical adjustment marks on the obverse; and a heavy lintmark on the right side of the reverse (yet, it is still a nice, six-figure coin). Though there are numerically finer examples, my personal favorite is Bob Simpson's PCGS MS62+ -- it is well-struck, has great color, and is free of any distracting problems.

David Akers (1975/88): This is a distinct and highly desireable type coin since all subsequent quarter eagles have stars on the obverse. The reverse has 16 stars above the eagle. Most specimens that I have seen are weakly struck on the hair curls around the face, and some specimens also show various degrees of deterioration in the die at the E of LIBERTY. The majority of known pieces are proof-like or at least partially so. A small number of relatively choice uncirculated examples exist, and claims that only 15 to 20 pieces are known seem to me to be exaggerated. A closer estimate of the number extant would probably be between 30 and 40.