PCGS: The Standard for the Rare Coin Industry

1803 $10 Small Stars Reverse (Regular Strike)

Series: Draped Bust $10 1795-1804

PCGS MS64+

PCGS MS64+

PCGS MS64

PCGS MS64

PCGS MS63

PCGS MS63

PCGS #:
8565
Designer:
Robert Scot
Edge:
Reeded
Diameter:
33.00 millimeters
Weight:
17.50 grams
Mintage:
15,017
Mint:
Philadelphia
Metal:
91.7% Gold, 8.3% Copper
Current Auctions - PCGS Graded
Current Auctions - NGC Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - PCGS Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - NGC Graded

Rarity and Survival Estimates Learn More

Grades Survival
Estimate
Numismatic
Rarity
Relative Rarity
By Type
Relative Rarity
By Series
All Grades 250 R-6.6 5 / 10 TIE 8 / 14 TIE
60 or Better 125 R-7.7 8 / 10 12 / 14
65 or Better 3 R-9.8 4 / 10 4 / 14 TIE
Survival Estimate
All Grades 250
60 or Better 125
65 or Better 3
Numismatic Rarity
All Grades R-6.6
60 or Better R-7.7
65 or Better R-9.8
Relative Rarity By Type All Specs in this Type
All Grades 5 / 10 TIE
60 or Better 8 / 10
65 or Better 4 / 10
Relative Rarity By Series All Specs in this Series
All Grades 8 / 14 TIE
60 or Better 12 / 14
65 or Better 4 / 14 TIE

Condition Census What Is This?

Pos Grade Image Pedigree and History
1 MS65 PCGS grade

Goldbergs 9/1999:1813, not sold - Superior 3/2000:939, $109,250

1 MS65 estimated grade

National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution

2 MS64+ PCGS grade

Louis E. Eliasberg, Sr. Collection - Bowers & Ruddy 10/1982:657, $27,500

2 MS64 PCGS grade
2 MS64 PCGS grade
2 MS64 PCGS grade
2 MS64 PCGS grade
2 MS64 PCGS grade
2 MS64 PCGS grade
2 MS64 PCGS grade
#1 MS65 PCGS grade

Goldbergs 9/1999:1813, not sold - Superior 3/2000:939, $109,250

#1 MS65 estimated grade

National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution

#2 MS64+ PCGS grade

Louis E. Eliasberg, Sr. Collection - Bowers & Ruddy 10/1982:657, $27,500

#2 MS64 PCGS grade
#2 MS64 PCGS grade
#2 MS64 PCGS grade
#2 MS64 PCGS grade
#2 MS64 PCGS grade
#2 MS64 PCGS grade
#2 MS64 PCGS grade
Ron Guth:

1803 Eagles ($10) are found with either large or small stars on the reverse. In the years following David Akers' writeup in 1980, sufficient interest has developed in the two varieties that they are now recognized by PCGS and NGC, and the respective population reports give us a good estimate as to their relative rarity. Akers called the Large Stars reverse "decidedly more rare" and he was correct -- the Large Stars (according to the PCGS Population Report) is four times as rare as the Small Stars variety. However, both can be found in Mint State with relative ease, though such high-grade pieces are rather expensive.

The PCGS CoinFacts Condition Census for the Small Stars variety starts at MS64 and ends at MS65. This is an amazingly high level for any early U.S. coin, especially for a large-size gold coin. This indicates that many were saved by collectors, to whom we give thanks for their prescient thinking.

Full struck examples of this variety are non-existent. All come with weak stars, especially on the lower left; the rare example will have strong details on the arrows and the eagle's claw which holds them.

The finest 1803 Small Reverse Stars $10's are a single PCGS MS65 (which has been off the market since 2000) and a similar Gem in the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution.

David Akers: Eagles were minted in 1802 but all were struck using dies dated 1801. Therefore, the 1803 is the next issue of this type. As a date, the 1803 is perhaps twice as rare as the 1799 or 1801, and it is considerably more difficult to obtain in choice or gem uncirculated condition. Most available specimens are are quite high grade, EF-AU being typical. Varieties exist with small reverse stars as on earlier issues and large reverse stars as on the 1804. No difference in value is generally ascribed to these varieties but in my opinion, the large reverse stars variety is decidedly more rare, and should be worth a premium. There is also one interesting variety, discovered by Harry Bass, that has an additional 14th star in the reverse clouds.