PCGS: The Standard for the Rare Coin Industry

1847 1C Hawaii, BN (Regular Strike)

Series: (None)

PCGS MS65BN

PCGS MS65BN

View More Images

PCGS MS64BN

PCGS MS64BN

PCGS MS64BN

PCGS MS64BN

PCGS #:
10965
Designer:
N/A
Edge:
N/A
Diameter:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Mintage:
100,000
Mint:
Philadelphia
Metal:
Copper
Major Varieties

Current Auctions - PCGS Graded
Current Auctions - NGC Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - PCGS Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - NGC Graded

Condition Census What Is This?

Pos Grade Image Pedigree and History
1 MS65BN PCGS grade PCGS #10965 (MS, Brown)     65
1 MS65BN PCGS grade
1 MS65BN PCGS grade
1 MS65BN PCGS grade
1 MS65BN PCGS grade
1 MS65BN PCGS grade
7 MS64BN PCGS grade
7 MS64BN PCGS grade
7 MS64BN PCGS grade
7 MS64BN PCGS grade
PCGS #10965 (MS, Brown)     65 #1 MS65BN PCGS grade
#1 MS65BN PCGS grade
#1 MS65BN PCGS grade
#1 MS65BN PCGS grade
#1 MS65BN PCGS grade
#1 MS65BN PCGS grade
#7 MS64BN PCGS grade
#7 MS64BN PCGS grade
#7 MS64BN PCGS grade
#7 MS64BN PCGS grade
Ron Guth:

The 1847 Hawaiian Keneta (One Cent) was commissioned by King Kamehameha III, ruler of the Hawaiian Islands, under a newly established monetary system. The Keneta was to be the equivalent of the United States Large Cent; it was, in fact, minted privately in America. The designer and engraver was Edward Hulseman, who is perhaps better known for his 1837 Half Cent token. An obvious error on Hulseman's part was to misspell the denomination as "Hapa Haneri" instead of "Hapa Hanele". Although the coin was a disappointment to the Hawaiians, the Keneta remained legal tender until 1884 and circulated even later. According to Breen, Wayte Raymond used to travel to Belmont, Massachusetts in the 1950's to purchase Uncirculated examples from the descendants of the original minters!

In the May 20, 1953 issue of The Numismatic Scrapbook, Melvin Came offered Hawaiian Cents "from the hoard I discovered" at $3.50 for VF or better examples and $5.00 for Sharp Uncs!

The most common Mint State grade appears to be MS-63, followed by MS-62, then MS-64. Gems are very rare.

Sources and/or recommended reading: "Walter Breen's Complete Encyclopedia Of U.S. And Colonial Coins" by Walter Breen

"Standard Catalog Of World Coins, 19th Century, Second Edition 1801-1900" by Chester L. Krause and Clifford Mishler