PCGS: The Standard for the Rare Coin Industry

1903 G$1 LA Purchase, Jefferson (Regular Strike)

Series: Gold Commemoratives 1903-1926

PCGS MS67+

PCGS MS67+

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PCGS MS67+

PCGS MS67+

PCGS MS67+

PCGS MS67+

PCGS #:
7443
Designer:
Charles E. Barber
Edge:
Reeded
Diameter:
14.30 millimeters
Weight:
1.70 grams
Mintage:
17,500
Mint:
Philadelphia
Metal:
90% Gold, 10% Copper
Major Varieties

Current Auctions - PCGS Graded
Current Auctions - NGC Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - PCGS Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - NGC Graded

Rarity and Survival Estimates Learn More

Grades Survival
Estimate
Numismatic
Rarity
Relative Rarity
By Type
Relative Rarity
By Series
All Grades 10,000 R-3.0 11 / 13 11 / 13
60 or Better 9,000 R-3.2 11 / 13 11 / 13
65 or Better 3,000 R-4.4 12 / 13 12 / 13
Survival Estimate
All Grades 10,000
60 or Better 9,000
65 or Better 3,000
Numismatic Rarity
All Grades R-3.0
60 or Better R-3.2
65 or Better R-4.4
Relative Rarity By Type All Specs in this Type
All Grades 11 / 13
60 or Better 11 / 13
65 or Better 12 / 13
Relative Rarity By Series All Specs in this Series
All Grades 11 / 13
60 or Better 11 / 13
65 or Better 12 / 13

Condition Census What Is This?

Pos Grade Image Pedigree and History
1 MS67+ PCGS grade

Legend Rare Coin Auctions 6/2019:506

1 MS67+ PCGS grade MS67+ PCGS grade
1 MS67+ PCGS grade
1 MS67+ PCGS grade
1 MS67+ PCGS grade
1 MS67+ PCGS grade
1 MS67+ PCGS grade
1 MS67+ PCGS grade
1 MS67+ PCGS grade
1 MS67+ PCGS grade
#1 MS67+ PCGS grade

Legend Rare Coin Auctions 6/2019:506

MS67+ PCGS grade #1 MS67+ PCGS grade
#1 MS67+ PCGS grade
#1 MS67+ PCGS grade
#1 MS67+ PCGS grade
#1 MS67+ PCGS grade
#1 MS67+ PCGS grade
#1 MS67+ PCGS grade
#1 MS67+ PCGS grade
#1 MS67+ PCGS grade
Jaime Hernandez:

In the early 1800's Thomas Jefferson sent U.S. representatives to make a deal with Napoleon Bonaparte for the purchase of a large section of the Louisiana Territory. On April 30, 1803, the United States finally signed the Louisiana Purchase Treaty. This purchase immediately doubled the size of the United States at that time.

100 years later, Congress appropriated $5 million to fund the construction of a world fair, including the building’s and exhibits. Additionally Congress also approved the production of 250,000 gold dollars to commemorate this memorable event. At the time, Farran Zerbe famous coin collector and dealer had close connections with the Mint and he suggested the use of two different designs on the coins in an attempt to popularize the coins.

Therefore, the Mint struck two different 1903 Louisiana Purchase Gold Dollars. One had a portrait of Thomas Jefferson on the obverse, while the second on had a portrait of William McKinley. Both coin designs carried the same reverse design.

Obviously, the first coin had Thomas Jefferson’s design since he is the one who made the Louisiana Purchase possible. McKinley on the other hand, appeared on the second coin design because he was assassinated just six months after he signed the appropriations bill for the Exposition.

At the Exposition Fairground, each 1903 Louisiana Purchase Gold Dollar was being sold by Zerbe at a price of $3 each. Unfortunately, the entire mintage of the coins failed to sell out. Ten years after the Exposition, Zerbe continued to sell them at a lower price than the original $3 issue price. By 1914, at least 215,000 coins still remained unsold and were later melted by the U.S. Mint.