PCGS: The Standard for the Rare Coin Industry

1915 50C J-1793/1960 (Proof)

Series: Patterns - PR

PR63 estimated grade<BR>Image courtesy of <a href="http://www.ha.com" target="_blank">Heritage Numismatic Auctions</a>

PR63 estimated grade
Image courtesy of Heritage Numismatic Auctions

PCGS PR64

PCGS PR64

PCGS #:
12176
Designer:
N/A
Edge:
N/A
Diameter:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Mintage:
N/A
Mint:
Philadelphia
Metal:
Gold
Major Varieties

Current Auctions - PCGS Graded
Current Auctions - NGC Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - PCGS Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - NGC Graded

Condition Census What Is This?

Pos Grade Image Pedigree and History
1 PR64 PCGS grade

Virgil Brand - B.G. Johnson - Celina Coin Co. - A. Friedman - NERCA 7/1979:1365, $27,000 - Sound Beach Collection - Heritage 11/2003:11252, $165,000 - Southern Collection - Simpson Collection

2 PR63 estimated grade

Fred E. Olsen Collection - B. Max Mehl 11/1944:1769, $4,250 - King Farouk - Sotheby's 1954:309 - Norweb Collection - Bowers & Merena 11/1988:3307 - The Lemus Collection - Queller Family Collection Part Two - Heritage 1/2009:1962, $345,000

#1 PR64 PCGS grade

Virgil Brand - B.G. Johnson - Celina Coin Co. - A. Friedman - NERCA 7/1979:1365, $27,000 - Sound Beach Collection - Heritage 11/2003:11252, $165,000 - Southern Collection - Simpson Collection

#2 PR63 estimated grade

Fred E. Olsen Collection - B. Max Mehl 11/1944:1769, $4,250 - King Farouk - Sotheby's 1954:309 - Norweb Collection - Bowers & Merena 11/1988:3307 - The Lemus Collection - Queller Family Collection Part Two - Heritage 1/2009:1962, $345,000

Ron Guth:

Judd 1960 (formerly Judd 1793) is die trial, in gold, of the Panama-Pacific Half Dollar BEFORE the mintmark was added to the die. Normally, die trials are made in a less valuable, base metal, not a more valuable, precious metal, especially not one that is worth more than the intended metal, and which is inappropriate for the denomination. The physical characteristics of this coin raise even more questions. Each of the two known examples is struck on a filed-down, $20 gold piece, with traces of the undertype visible on both. Thus, the thickness of the known Judd 1960s exceeds that of a normal half dollar planchet. It would appear that these coins were not intended to be die trials, used by the engraving department to check their work; rather, they were made as special souvenir pieces by someone at the Mint.

Regardless of the intent, these are extremely rare coins. As stated above, only two are known, both of which have well-established pedigrees. Both coins are nearly identical in grade and appearance. In their rare appearances at auction, they have risen steadily in price, indicating a favorable reception within the numismatic community.