1921 50C Missouri (Regular Strike)

Series: Silver Commemoratives

PCGS MS66+

PCGS MS66+

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PCGS MS66+

PCGS MS66+

PCGS MS66+

PCGS MS66+

PCGS #:
9330
Designer:
Robert Aitken
Edge:
Reeded
Diameter:
30.60 millimeters
Weight:
12.50 grams
Mintage:
15,428
Mint:
Philadelphia
Metal:
90% Silver, 10% Copper
Major Varieties

Current Auctions - PCGS Graded
Current Auctions - NGC Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - PCGS Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - NGC Graded

Rarity and Survival Estimates Learn More

Grades Survival
Estimate
Numismatic
Rarity
Relative Rarity
By Type
Relative Rarity
By Series
All Grades 9,625 R-3.0 82 / 144 TIE 82 / 144 TIE
60 or Better 6,250 R-3.7 54 / 144 TIE 54 / 144 TIE
65 or Better 725 R-5.5 7 / 144 7 / 144
Survival Estimate
All Grades 9,625
60 or Better 6,250
65 or Better 725
Numismatic Rarity
All Grades R-3.0
60 or Better R-3.7
65 or Better R-5.5
Relative Rarity By Type All Specs in this Type
All Grades 82 / 144 TIE
60 or Better 54 / 144 TIE
65 or Better 7 / 144
Relative Rarity By Series All Specs in this Series
All Grades 82 / 144 TIE
60 or Better 54 / 144 TIE
65 or Better 7 / 144

Condition Census What Is This?

Pos Grade Image Pedigree and History
1 MS66+ PCGS grade  
	MS66+ PCGS grade

Heritage 10/2015:3664, $70,500 - J&L Collection (PCGS Set Registry)

1 MS66+ PCGS grade
3 MS66 PCGS grade
3 MS66 PCGS grade
3 MS66 PCGS grade MS66 PCGS grade
3 MS66 PCGS grade
3 MS66 PCGS grade
3 MS66 PCGS grade
3 MS66 PCGS grade
3 MS66 PCGS grade
 
	MS66+ PCGS grade 
#1 MS66+ PCGS grade

Heritage 10/2015:3664, $70,500 - J&L Collection (PCGS Set Registry)

#1 MS66+ PCGS grade
#3 MS66 PCGS grade
#3 MS66 PCGS grade
MS66 PCGS grade #3 MS66 PCGS grade
#3 MS66 PCGS grade
#3 MS66 PCGS grade
#3 MS66 PCGS grade
#3 MS66 PCGS grade
#3 MS66 PCGS grade
David Hall:

The 1921 Missouri was struck to commemorate the 100th anniversary of Missouri statehood. A very large mintage was authorized but many were melted as unsold. There is some comtroversy as to the actual "distributed" mintage and even experts disagree. To add to the confusion, there are two varieties of the Missouri and the exact mintage breakdown between the two is speculative. The two varieities are one with a 2 and a 4 struck into the obverse field with a star between the 2 and the 4. In numismatic circles, this variety is known as the "Missouri 2 by 4". The other variety does not have the 2*4 in the field and is known as the "Missouri plain". The 2 and 4 were meant to signify that Missouri was the 24th state admitted to the Union and the idea was to have the 2 by 4s sell for a premium to defray the cost of production. But as it turned out, both varieties were sold at an original price of $1.00. The distributed mintage for the plain Missuri has been reported as between 10,428 and 15,428 coins. The Missouri 2*4 mintage has long been listed at 5,000 coins. However, there is a problem with the 5,000 figure for the Missouri 2*4 in that it is just barely rarer than the the Plain Missouri. My personal feeling is that the 15,428 figure is too high and the 5,000 is too low.

Whatever the true distributed mintage, the two Missouris are among the rarest issues in the silver commemorative series. For the Plain Missouri, the typical grade can range between AU50 to MS64. MS65 specimens are somewhat rare and Superb Gem MS66 examples are truly rare. Marks are usually not a problem with this issue. Strike can be somewhat of an problem, but the real issues with Missouris is eye appeal. Frosty, full luster Gems are much rarer than dull or toned examples. Many Missouris have varying degrees of toning, some natural, some otherwise. But many of the toned Missouris are quite dark. Serious collectors should hold out for a frosty white Gem or an attractive, naturally toned piece.