1926 50C Sesquicentennial (Regular Strike)

Series: Silver Commemoratives

PCGS MS66+

PCGS MS66+

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PCGS MS66

PCGS MS66

PCGS MS66

PCGS MS66

PCGS #:
9374
Designer:
John Frederick Lewis
Edge:
Reeded
Diameter:
30.60 millimeters
Weight:
12.50 grams
Mintage:
141,120
Mint:
Philadelphia
Metal:
90% Silver, 10% Copper
Major Varieties

Current Auctions - PCGS Graded
Current Auctions - NGC Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - PCGS Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - NGC Graded

Rarity and Survival Estimates Learn More

Grades Survival
Estimate
Numismatic
Rarity
Relative Rarity
By Type
Relative Rarity
By Series
All Grades 65,000 R-2.3 123 / 144 TIE 123 / 144 TIE
60 or Better 42,500 R-2.5 121 / 144 TIE 121 / 144 TIE
65 or Better 2,000 R-4.6 32 / 144 TIE 32 / 144 TIE
Survival Estimate
All Grades 65,000
60 or Better 42,500
65 or Better 2,000
Numismatic Rarity
All Grades R-2.3
60 or Better R-2.5
65 or Better R-4.6
Relative Rarity By Type All Specs in this Type
All Grades 123 / 144 TIE
60 or Better 121 / 144 TIE
65 or Better 32 / 144 TIE
Relative Rarity By Series All Specs in this Series
All Grades 123 / 144 TIE
60 or Better 121 / 144 TIE
65 or Better 32 / 144 TIE

Condition Census What Is This?

Pos Grade Image Pedigree and History
1 MS66 PCGS grade MS66 PCGS grade

Larry Shepherd Collection - Heritage 3/2004:6973, $36,800 - Cary & Cheryl Porter Collection - Heritage 5/2007:2607, $37,375 - Louis Bassano Collection - Heritage 7/2009:1482, $43,125

1 MS66 PCGS grade  
	PCGS #9374 (MS) 66

Heritage 1/2013:5978, $30,550

1 MS66 PCGS grade MS66 PCGS grade

Heritage 7/2002:5103, $18,400 - “JFS” Collection (PCGS Set Registry) - Heritage 8/2004:4318, $21,275 - Heritage 9/2005:4056, $25,300

1 MS66 PCGS grade

Stack's/Bowers 8/2012:11584, not sold - Heritage 9/2013:6941, not sold - Heritage 4/2014:5863, $19,975

1 MS66 PCGS grade
1 MS66 PCGS grade
1 MS66 PCGS grade
1 MS66 PCGS grade
1 MS66 PCGS grade
1 MS66 PCGS grade
MS66 PCGS grade #1 MS66 PCGS grade

Larry Shepherd Collection - Heritage 3/2004:6973, $36,800 - Cary & Cheryl Porter Collection - Heritage 5/2007:2607, $37,375 - Louis Bassano Collection - Heritage 7/2009:1482, $43,125

 
	PCGS #9374 (MS) 66 
#1 MS66 PCGS grade

Heritage 1/2013:5978, $30,550

MS66 PCGS grade #1 MS66 PCGS grade

Heritage 7/2002:5103, $18,400 - “JFS” Collection (PCGS Set Registry) - Heritage 8/2004:4318, $21,275 - Heritage 9/2005:4056, $25,300

#1 MS66 PCGS grade

Stack's/Bowers 8/2012:11584, not sold - Heritage 9/2013:6941, not sold - Heritage 4/2014:5863, $19,975

#1 MS66 PCGS grade
#1 MS66 PCGS grade
#1 MS66 PCGS grade
#1 MS66 PCGS grade
#1 MS66 PCGS grade
#1 MS66 PCGS grade
David Hall:

The 1926 Sesquicentennial differed from the numerous commemorative issues of the 1930's in several ways. First, there is no doubt about the worthiness of the event commemorated, the 150th anniversary of American independence. Second, there were an enormous amount of Sesquis minted (1,000,528), but about 86% of the original mintage (859,048) were melted as unsold at the issue price of $1.00 per coin. Still, this made the Sesqui one of the highest "mintage", i.e. actually distributed to the public, of all silver commemoratives of the 1892-1954 classic era. Finally, though the mintage was very high, the design was poorly executed and very flat, thus most issues have lots or scraps and marks and Gem MS65 examples are rare. In this way the 1926 Sesqui is very similar to the also "flatly designed" 1923-S Monroe.

The typical Sesqui is MS63 or MS64. Because it was an "early" commemorative issue, i.e. struck before the flood of commemoratives issue during the commemorative collecting mania of the 1930's, Sesquis were not all saved and many reached circulation. Gem MS65s are rare and there are only about a dozen or so known Superb Gem MS66s. I personally have never seen or heard of a Sesqui that grades MS67 or higher. The big problem is scraps and marks, particularly on the face on the obverse. Sesquis come with varying degrees of toning, including a very unattractive yellow. The yellow coins sell for a considerable discount and it seems there is somewhat of a two tier market...decent eye appeal coins and yellow toned coins. Obviously, collectors prefer good eye appeal over ugly yellow toning!