PCGS: The Standard for the Rare Coin Industry

1942 5C Type 1 (Regular Strike)

Series: Jefferson Five Cents 1938-1964

PCGS MS67

PCGS MS67

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REVERSE COMPARISON

REVERSE COMPARISON

PCGS MS66+

PCGS MS66+

PCGS #:
4013
Designer:
Felix Schlag
Edge:
Plain
Diameter:
21.20 millimeters
Weight:
5.00 grams
Mintage:
49,789,000
Mint:
Philadelphia
Metal:
75% Copper, 25% Nickel
Current Auctions - PCGS Graded
Current Auctions - NGC Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - PCGS Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - NGC Graded

Rarity and Survival Estimates Learn More

Grades Survival
Estimate
Numismatic
Rarity
Relative Rarity
By Type
Relative Rarity
By Series
All Grades 25,000,000 R-1.0 9 / 68 TIE 12 / 82 TIE
60 or Better 80,000 R-2.2 6 / 68 TIE 9 / 82 TIE
65 or Better 67,000 R-2.3 15 / 68 TIE 18 / 82 TIE
Survival Estimate
All Grades 25,000,000
60 or Better 80,000
65 or Better 67,000
Numismatic Rarity
All Grades R-1.0
60 or Better R-2.2
65 or Better R-2.3
Relative Rarity By Type All Specs in this Type
All Grades 9 / 68 TIE
60 or Better 6 / 68 TIE
65 or Better 15 / 68 TIE
Relative Rarity By Series All Specs in this Series
All Grades 12 / 82 TIE
60 or Better 9 / 82 TIE
65 or Better 18 / 82 TIE

Condition Census What Is This?

Pos Grade Image Pedigree and History
1 MS67 PCGS grade
1 MS67 PCGS grade
1 MS67 PCGS grade
1 MS67 PCGS grade
1 MS67 PCGS grade
1 MS67 PCGS grade
7 MS66 PCGS grade
7 MS66 PCGS grade
7 MS66 PCGS grade
7 MS66 PCGS grade
#1 MS67 PCGS grade
#1 MS67 PCGS grade
#1 MS67 PCGS grade
#1 MS67 PCGS grade
#1 MS67 PCGS grade
#1 MS67 PCGS grade
#7 MS66 PCGS grade
#7 MS66 PCGS grade
#7 MS66 PCGS grade
#7 MS66 PCGS grade
Ron Guth:

In 1942, the Mint made Jefferson Nickels out of two different compositions. Those made early in the year contained pure Nickel. Those made later in the year consisted of an alloy where the Nickel was removed completely and replaced (in part) by silver. The reason for the replacement was because of the need for Nickel by the military in World War II.

The colors of the two alloys are similar, but different enough that the coins can be told apart by the naked eye. The silver alloy is a brighter white color when the coins are new. When worn, the silver alloy takes on a greenish color. However, just to make it easy to tell the coins apart, the Mints placed large mintmarks on the reverse of the coins, just above the dome of Monticello. This was the first appearance of a "P" mintmark on any US coin.

Both types of 1942 "Nickels" are very common and can be found in high grades with relative ease.