ND 1/2P Confederatio, Wash/Shld, BN (Regular Strike)

Series: U.S. Colonial Issues

Images courtesy of Bowers & Ruddy

Images courtesy of Bowers & Ruddy

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PCGS #:
852
Designer:
N/A
Edge:
N/A
Diameter:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Mintage:
N/A
Mint:
N/A
Metal:
Other
Major Varieties

Current Auctions - PCGS Graded
Current Auctions - NGC Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - PCGS Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - NGC Graded

Condition Census What Is This?

Pos Grade Image Pedigree and History
1 About Uncirculated

Edgar H. Adams - David Proskey - Hillyer Ryder Collection - F.C.C. Boyd Collection - John J. Ford, Jr. Collection - Stack's 10/2003:73, $253,000

2 VF35 estimated grade

The discovery piece for this variety

Capt. John Haseltine, sold privately for $150 - Sylvester S. Crosby Collection - Capt. John Haseltine 6/1883:???, $620 - Lorin G. Parmelee Collection - New York Coin & Stamp 6/1890:368, $150 - James Ten Eyck Collection - B. Max Mehl, sold privately in 5/1922 - Waldo C. Newcomer Collection (Inventory #2946 as Raw “Fine...no duplicate known”, with a cost of $1,100) - B. Max Mehl, sold privately on 2/9/1932 - John Work Garrett Collection - Johns Hopkins University Collection - Bowers & Ruddy 10/1980:1390, $50,000

Per the 2003 Stack’s catalog of the Ford Collection: “said to have been found by Captain Haseltine amongst an accumulation of 1,000 coppers owned by an old lady grocer who had received them in change over the years. Haseltine offered the then unique coin to Dr. Maris priced at $50, but Maris declined the offer. Haseltine thereupon sold it to Sylvester Crosby for $150, three times the price Haseltine had quoted to Maris. Crosby proudly showed off his new coin at the February 5, 1875 meeting of the Boston Numismatic Society but by then it was one of three known, the other two being owned by William Sumner Appleton."

3 Very Fine, holed

This was the second example discovered of this variety (per the Chapman 6/1914 catalog)

George M. Parsons Collection - Henry Chapman 6/1914:221 (as Raw Very Fine, holed), $740 - Dr. George Fuld, sold circa 1970 - private collector

#1 About Uncirculated

Edgar H. Adams - David Proskey - Hillyer Ryder Collection - F.C.C. Boyd Collection - John J. Ford, Jr. Collection - Stack's 10/2003:73, $253,000

#2 VF35 estimated grade

The discovery piece for this variety

Capt. John Haseltine, sold privately for $150 - Sylvester S. Crosby Collection - Capt. John Haseltine 6/1883:???, $620 - Lorin G. Parmelee Collection - New York Coin & Stamp 6/1890:368, $150 - James Ten Eyck Collection - B. Max Mehl, sold privately in 5/1922 - Waldo C. Newcomer Collection (Inventory #2946 as Raw “Fine...no duplicate known”, with a cost of $1,100) - B. Max Mehl, sold privately on 2/9/1932 - John Work Garrett Collection - Johns Hopkins University Collection - Bowers & Ruddy 10/1980:1390, $50,000

Per the 2003 Stack’s catalog of the Ford Collection: “said to have been found by Captain Haseltine amongst an accumulation of 1,000 coppers owned by an old lady grocer who had received them in change over the years. Haseltine offered the then unique coin to Dr. Maris priced at $50, but Maris declined the offer. Haseltine thereupon sold it to Sylvester Crosby for $150, three times the price Haseltine had quoted to Maris. Crosby proudly showed off his new coin at the February 5, 1875 meeting of the Boston Numismatic Society but by then it was one of three known, the other two being owned by William Sumner Appleton."

#3 Very Fine, holed

This was the second example discovered of this variety (per the Chapman 6/1914 catalog)

George M. Parsons Collection - Henry Chapman 6/1914:221 (as Raw Very Fine, holed), $740 - Dr. George Fuld, sold circa 1970 - private collector

John Agre: Three known. Ford's was AU58 or so and brought $253,000 as a raw coin in 2003. The second is a VF35 or so ex-Garrett. The third is holed.
Ron Guth:

There is a similar Washington-related coin that mimics this type. The front of the coin shows a bust of Washington surrounded by the legend NON VIU VIRTUTE VICI (though much of the legend has worn away). The reverse shows the standard New Jersey reverse with a shield surrounded by the legend E PLURIBUS UNUM. This particular coin, known by just one example, is so rare, and has appeared so infrequently, that it is barely known by the numismatic community. The coin first appeared in the sale of the Parmelee Collection in 1890, where it was purchased for $28 by Charles Steigerwalt. John Work Garrett ended up with the coin, perhaps via a trade or purchase from Col. James W. Ellsworth, then he held it until his death, after which it went to Johns Hopkins University. In 1980, the coin sold in only its second auction appearance for $16,500 -- a substantial amount for the time -- and it has been in hiding ever since. The coin is listed in the Baker reference as his number 12.

Who knows what it would fetch today.