New Yorke Token Brass (Regular Strike)

Series: U.S. Colonial Issues

PCGS AU55

PCGS AU55

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PCGS XF40

PCGS XF40

PCGS VF30

PCGS VF30

PCGS #:
226
Designer:
N/A
Edge:
N/A
Diameter:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Mintage:
N/A
Mint:
N/A
Metal:
Other
Major Varieties

Current Auctions - PCGS Graded
Current Auctions - NGC Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - PCGS Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - NGC Graded

Condition Census What Is This?

Pos Grade Image Pedigree and History
1 AU55 PCGS grade

Coin Rarities Online

2 XF40 PCGS grade XF40 PCGS grade

Ted L. Craige Collection - Stack's/Bowers 3/2013:196, $94,000 - Heritage 8/2019:3646, $48,068

3 VF details, cleaned estimated grade

Bowers & Merena 11/2002:31, $12,650 - Jon Hanson, sold privately on 5/10/2003 for $28,000 - Donald Groves Partrick Collection - Heritage 1/2015:5629, $61,687.50

4 F15 PCGS grade

Heritage 1/2010:2390, $32,200

4 F15 PCGS grade
4 F15 PCGS grade
7 F15 estimated grade

Ed Frossard, sold privately in 1883 - T. Harrison Garrett Collection - Robert Garrett Collection - John Work Garrett Collection - Johns Hopkins University Collection - Bowers & Ruddy 10/1980:1322, $5,250

8 F12 estimated grade

Old New England Collection - Heritage 4/2014:5485, $8,225

9 VG details, scratches estimated grade

Robison Collection - Stack's 2/1982:59 - David Sonderman, sold privately on 2/12/1982 for $1,025 - Donald Groves Partrick Collection - Heritage 1/2015:5630, $9,400

10 G4 PCGS grade

Stack's 5/1968:51, $400 - Henry P. Kendall Foundation Collection - Stack's/Bowers 3/2015:2481, $10,575

#1 AU55 PCGS grade

Coin Rarities Online

XF40 PCGS grade #2 XF40 PCGS grade

Ted L. Craige Collection - Stack's/Bowers 3/2013:196, $94,000 - Heritage 8/2019:3646, $48,068

#3 VF details, cleaned estimated grade

Bowers & Merena 11/2002:31, $12,650 - Jon Hanson, sold privately on 5/10/2003 for $28,000 - Donald Groves Partrick Collection - Heritage 1/2015:5629, $61,687.50

#4 F15 PCGS grade

Heritage 1/2010:2390, $32,200

#4 F15 PCGS grade
#4 F15 PCGS grade
#7 F15 estimated grade

Ed Frossard, sold privately in 1883 - T. Harrison Garrett Collection - Robert Garrett Collection - John Work Garrett Collection - Johns Hopkins University Collection - Bowers & Ruddy 10/1980:1322, $5,250

#8 F12 estimated grade

Old New England Collection - Heritage 4/2014:5485, $8,225

#9 VG details, scratches estimated grade

Robison Collection - Stack's 2/1982:59 - David Sonderman, sold privately on 2/12/1982 for $1,025 - Donald Groves Partrick Collection - Heritage 1/2015:5630, $9,400

#10 G4 PCGS grade

Stack's 5/1968:51, $400 - Henry P. Kendall Foundation Collection - Stack's/Bowers 3/2015:2481, $10,575

Ron Guth:
The New Yorke Token is a small piece, usually made of brass, that experts believe was struck sometime in the late 1600's (1670 is a date that is often offered). This token is so popular that it was ranked 25th in the "100 Greatest American Medals and Tokens" book.
Most examples are in relatively poor condition, often pitted from corrosion, or on defective planchets. No Mint State examples are known. The finest example is the PCGS AU55, a formerly unknown example that burst onto the numismatic scene in 2016
This token represented the first time that the words "New Yorke" appeared on any coin.
The 1991 ANS Proceedings publication Money of Pre-Federal America contains an excellent study of the New Yorke Token by John Kleeburg, where he listed 20 examples that either appeared at public auction or were in institutional collections. Based on similarities between the eagle on the coin and the crest of New York Governor Francis Lovelace, Kleeburg proposes that these coins were made sometime between 1668 and 1673.
From "The Early Coins of America" by Sylvester S. Crosby --
"The first of these is called the New Yorke Token, and has until quite recently been considered unique, but within three years, three new specimens have been discovered; two of these are owned in Boston, Mr. Appleton having one in lead, and Mr. Parmelee one in brass. The other specimen is in lead, but its present ownership is unknown to us. The only specimen in lead accessible to us is so much corroded as to furnish no satisfactory basis for ascertaining its original weight.