St Patrick 1/2 P New Jersey, BN (Regular Strike)

Series: U.S. Colonial Issues

PCGS XF45BN

PCGS XF45BN

PCGS XF40BN

PCGS XF40BN

PCGS XF40BN

PCGS XF40BN

PCGS #:
46
Designer:
N/A
Edge:
N/A
Diameter:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Mintage:
N/A
Mint:
N/A
Metal:
Copper
Major Varieties

Current Auctions - PCGS Graded
Current Auctions - NGC Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - PCGS Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - NGC Graded

Condition Census What Is This?

Pos Grade Image Pedigree and History
1 XF45 estimated grade
2 XF40 PCGS grade
2 XF40 PCGS grade
2 XF40 PCGS grade
2 XF40 PCGS grade
2 XF40 PCGS grade
2 XF40 PCGS grade
8 VF35 PCGS grade
8 VF35 PCGS grade
8 VF35 PCGS grade
#1 XF45 estimated grade
#2 XF40 PCGS grade
#2 XF40 PCGS grade
#2 XF40 PCGS grade
#2 XF40 PCGS grade
#2 XF40 PCGS grade
#2 XF40 PCGS grade
#8 VF35 PCGS grade
#8 VF35 PCGS grade
#8 VF35 PCGS grade
Ron Guth:

The St. Patrick coins (so-named because of the image of the saint that appears on the back of the coins) were struck sometime prior to 1681, when some of them were brought to America by a man named Mark Newby. The front of the coins show a crowned king on his knees playing a harp and gazing up at a crown. The back of the Farthings show St. Patrick driving serpents into the sea; the back of the Halfpennies show St. Patrick surrounded by a crowd of people. Although these coins were struck overseas, they became legal money in New Jersey in May, 1682 because of the pressing need for coins in the Colonies.

Many of the copper pieces have a brass splasher placed deliberately to give the large crown a golden color.