St Patrick Farth New Jersey, Silver (Regular Strike)

Series: U.S. Colonial Issues

PCGS MS62

PCGS MS62

View More Images

PCGS AU55+

PCGS AU55+

PCGS AU55

PCGS AU55

PCGS #:
45
Designer:
N/A
Edge:
N/A
Diameter:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Mintage:
N/A
Mint:
N/A
Metal:
Other
Major Varieties

Current Auctions - PCGS Graded
Current Auctions - NGC Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - PCGS Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - NGC Graded

Condition Census What Is This?

Pos Grade Image Pedigree and History
1 MS62 PCGS grade MS62 PCGS grade

Ted L. Craige Collection - Stack’s/Bowers 11/2012:6148, $80,500

2 AU55 PCGS grade
2 AU55 PCGS grade
2 AU55 PCGS grade
5 AU53 PCGS grade AU53 PCGS grade

Don Taxay, sold privately in the 1970’s - Howard Collection - Stack's/Bowers 8/2011:7165, $34,500

6 XF40 PCGS grade
7 VF35 PCGS grade
7 VF35 PCGS grade
7 VF35 PCGS grade
10 VF30 PCGS grade
MS62 PCGS grade #1 MS62 PCGS grade

Ted L. Craige Collection - Stack’s/Bowers 11/2012:6148, $80,500

#2 AU55 PCGS grade
#2 AU55 PCGS grade
#2 AU55 PCGS grade
AU53 PCGS grade #5 AU53 PCGS grade

Don Taxay, sold privately in the 1970’s - Howard Collection - Stack's/Bowers 8/2011:7165, $34,500

#6 XF40 PCGS grade
#7 VF35 PCGS grade
#7 VF35 PCGS grade
#7 VF35 PCGS grade
#10 VF30 PCGS grade
P. Scott Rubin: The Silver St. Patrick Farthing is a rare coin with approximately fifty specimens known. This is one of a group of St. Patrick coinage believed to have originated as currency in Ireland in the 1600’s. The exact date of their coinage is not known. Two sizes of St. Patrick coinage are known -- the smaller sized copper pieces have been called Farthings and the larger copper coins called Halfpenny’s.

The association with American coinage for these coins is an act by West Jersey in 1682 which gave legal tender status to coins called Newby (after Mark Newby, who brought many of these coins with him to America from Ireland) or St. Patrick (because of the image believed to be St. Patrick on the coins) Halfpennies. In 1682, there was both an East and West Jersey which later became New Jersey. This act of 1682 is the reason St. Patrick coinage is collected as part of the coinage of Colonial America.

While many thousands of copper St. Patrick Farthings were coined, only a small number of Silver coins were struck. Some believe they were struck to be used as another denomination while others believe they may have been patterns for display to promote their creator's copper coinage.

A few of the surviving Silver St. Patrick Farthings are in high grades of About Uncirculated or better however most are in Very Fine or lower grades.