OverlandTrail Coin Album

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1748-Mo M Real MS61 PCGS #670080

The 1 Real denomination was the workhorse coin of the Spanish Empire of the 18th century. Most specimens are very worn with little detail remaining. This piece, graded MS61, shows bold strike and details with mint lustre peering through the dark toning. The rim and edge detail is virtually intact with only slight weakness. A superb example of 1700's pillar coinage.

1749-Mo M 2 R VF35 PCGS #670081

The 2 reales denomination is referred to as "two bits" as it is two pieces of a "Piece of Eight", the 8 reales coin. Each bit is worth approximately 121/2 cents, therefore "two bits" is worth about one quarter dollar. This specimen was minted in Mexico City and bears a "M" mintmark.

1769-PTS JR 4 R VF30 PCGS #721975

The most difficult denomination of the "Spanish Milled Coinage" to find. This piece graded VF30 shows heavy circulation. This coin was minted at the Potosi Mint in Bolivia and bears the PTS mintmark.

1758-Mo M 1/2 R XF40 PCGS #670052

The 1/2 Real is the smallest denomination of Spanish Milled Coinage being valued at 6 1/4 cents. It takes 16 of the 1/2 Real coins to equal 1 Spanish Milled Dollar. This piece is graded XF40, darkly toned with nice surfaces and details. Minted in Mexico City.

1758-Mo M 1/2 R XF40 PCGS #670052

The 1/2 Real is the smallest denomination of Spanish Milled Coinage being valued at 6 1/4 cents. It takes 16 of the 1/2 Real coins to equal 1 Spanish Milled Dollar. This piece is graded XF40, darkly toned with nice surfaces and details. Minted in Mexico City.

1748-Mo M Real MS61 PCGS #670080

The 1 Real denomination was the workhorse coin of the Spanish Empire of the 18th century. Most specimens are very worn with little detail remaining. This piece, graded MS61, shows bold strike and details with mint lustre peering through the dark toning. The rim and edge detail is virtually intact with only slight weakness. A superb example of 1700's pillar coinage.

1748-Mo M Real MS61 PCGS #670080

The 1 Real denomination was the workhorse coin of the Spanish Empire of the 18th century. Most specimens are very worn with little detail remaining. This piece, graded MS61, shows bold strike and details with mint lustre peering through the dark toning. The rim and edge detail is virtually intact with only slight weakness. A superb example of 1700's pillar coinage.

1749-Mo M 2 R VF35 PCGS #670081

The 2 reales denomination is referred to as "two bits" as it is two pieces of a "Piece of Eight", the 8 reales coin. Each bit is worth approximately 121/2 cents, therefore "two bits" is worth about one quarter dollar. This specimen was minted in Mexico City and bears a "M" mintmark.

1749-Mo M 2 R VF35 PCGS #670081

The 2 reales denomination is referred to as "two bits" as it is two pieces of a "Piece of Eight", the 8 reales coin. Each bit is worth approximately 121/2 cents, therefore "two bits" is worth about one quarter dollar. This specimen was minted in Mexico City and bears a "M" mintmark.

1769-PTS JR 4 R VF30 PCGS #721975

The most difficult denomination of the "Spanish Milled Coinage" to find. This piece graded VF30 shows heavy circulation. This coin was minted at the Potosi Mint in Bolivia and bears the PTS mintmark.

1769-PTS JR 4 R VF30 PCGS #721975

The most difficult denomination of the "Spanish Milled Coinage" to find. This piece graded VF30 shows heavy circulation. This coin was minted at the Potosi Mint in Bolivia and bears the PTS mintmark.

1755-Mo MM 8 R Calico-338 XF45 PCGS #670083

Otherwise known as the "Pillar Dollar" or "Piece of Eight", this coin is the forerunner of the U. S. silver dollar. Before the Mint Act of 1792, the dollar value referenced in the Constitution is of the Spanish Milled Dollar. The coin remained legal tender until 1857 in the U. S. and circulated freely throughout the Americas. This piece was minted in Mexico City while Ferdinand VI ruled Spain.

1755-Mo MM 8 R Calico-338 XF45 PCGS #670083

Otherwise known as the "Pillar Dollar" or "Piece of Eight", this coin is the forerunner of the U. S. silver dollar. Before the Mint Act of 1792, the dollar value referenced in the Constitution is of the Spanish Milled Dollar. The coin remained legal tender until 1857 in the U. S. and circulated freely throughout the Americas. This piece was minted in Mexico City while Ferdinand VI ruled Spain.