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1840 $2.50 AU50 PCGS #7717

Per the "Encyclopedia Of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933" by Garrett and Guth, "The year 1840 is the first year of issue for the Liberty Head quarter eagle design by Christian Gobrecht. Today this date is quite popular for that reason. Surprisingly, these coins were not saved in significant quantities at the time of issue... Most coins seen are poorly struck in the center, with light die breaks sometimes encountered." The strike is also noted by David Akers in his "United States Gold Coins - An Analysis Of Auction Records - Volume II - Quarter Eagles". He states, "Always flatly struck on the head of Liberty, the stars, and on the eagle. Much more rare than the standard references and even the low mintage would indicate, particularly in grades above EF... Very underrated." Walter Breen's monograph "New Varieties Of $1, $2.50 and $5.00 United States Gold", suggests the "Broken die state is very rare." What has not been detailed by any of the authors is that the "broken die state" reverse coins also have a different obverse. The date is in a slightly different location (the 1 is left of center of a dentil versus right) and the 18 is thicker than the normal date. Also the 40 in the date is re-punched with the initial punch high and corrected lower. This can be seen between the crosslet and serif in the 4 and in the lower portion of the 0. Reference, PCGS s/n 83921274 (MS63+) and 37305318 (MS62).

1840 $2.50 AU50 PCGS #7717

Per the "Encyclopedia Of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933" by Garrett and Guth, "The year 1840 is the first year of issue for the Liberty Head quarter eagle design by Christian Gobrecht. Today this date is quite popular for that reason. Surprisingly, these coins were not saved in significant quantities at the time of issue... Most coins seen are poorly struck in the center, with light die breaks sometimes encountered." The strike is also noted by David Akers in his "United States Gold Coins - An Analysis Of Auction Records - Volume II - Quarter Eagles". He states, "Always flatly struck on the head of Liberty, the stars, and on the eagle. Much more rare than the standard references and even the low mintage would indicate, particularly in grades above EF... Very underrated." Walter Breen's monograph "New Varieties Of $1, $2.50 and $5.00 United States Gold", suggests the "Broken die state is very rare." What has not been detailed by any of the authors is that the "broken die state" reverse coins also have a different obverse. The date is in a slightly different location (the 1 is left of center of a dentil versus right) and the 18 is thicker than the normal date. Also the 40 in the date is re-punched with the initial punch high and corrected lower. This can be seen between the crosslet and serif in the 4 and in the lower portion of the 0. Reference, PCGS s/n 83921274 (MS63+) and 37305318 (MS62).

1840 $2.50 AU50 PCGS #7717

Per the "Encyclopedia Of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933" by Garrett and Guth, "The year 1840 is the first year of issue for the Liberty Head quarter eagle design by Christian Gobrecht. Today this date is quite popular for that reason. Surprisingly, these coins were not saved in significant quantities at the time of issue... Most coins seen are poorly struck in the center, with light die breaks sometimes encountered." The strike is also noted by David Akers in his "United States Gold Coins - An Analysis Of Auction Records - Volume II - Quarter Eagles". He states, "Always flatly struck on the head of Liberty, the stars, and on the eagle. Much more rare than the standard references and even the low mintage would indicate, particularly in grades above EF... Very underrated." Walter Breen's monograph "New Varieties Of $1, $2.50 and $5.00 United States Gold", suggests the "Broken die state is very rare." What has not been detailed by any of the authors is that the "broken die state" reverse coins also have a different obverse. The date is in a slightly different location (the 1 is left of center of a dentil versus right) and the 18 is thicker than the normal date. Also the 40 in the date is re-punched with the initial punch high and corrected lower. This can be seen between the crosslet and serif in the 4 and in the lower portion of the 0. Reference, PCGS s/n 83921274 (MS63+) and 37305318 (MS62).

1840 $2.50 AU50 PCGS #7717

Per the "Encyclopedia Of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933" by Garrett and Guth, "The year 1840 is the first year of issue for the Liberty Head quarter eagle design by Christian Gobrecht. Today this date is quite popular for that reason. Surprisingly, these coins were not saved in significant quantities at the time of issue... Most coins seen are poorly struck in the center, with light die breaks sometimes encountered." The strike is also noted by David Akers in his "United States Gold Coins - An Analysis Of Auction Records - Volume II - Quarter Eagles". He states, "Always flatly struck on the head of Liberty, the stars, and on the eagle. Much more rare than the standard references and even the low mintage would indicate, particularly in grades above EF... Very underrated." Walter Breen's monograph "New Varieties Of $1, $2.50 and $5.00 United States Gold", suggests the "Broken die state is very rare." What has not been detailed by any of the authors is that the "broken die state" reverse coins also have a different obverse. The date is in a slightly different location (the 1 is left of center of a dentil versus right) and the 18 is thicker than the normal date. Also the 40 in the date is re-punched with the initial punch high and corrected lower. This can be seen between the crosslet and serif in the 4 and in the lower portion of the 0. Reference, PCGS s/n 83921274 (MS63+) and 37305318 (MS62).

1842 $2.50 AU50 PCGS #7723

Rare (50-60 known per PCGS). As Garrett and Guth state in their "Encyclopedia Of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933", "As the tiny mintage suggests, the 1842 Liberty Head quarter eagle is a major rarity in any grade...A review of other auction records reveals that this date is seldom offered for sale in any grade... The 1842 quarter eagle is still very rare, much more so than many of the more popular Southern mint issues." David Akers' "An Analysis Of Auction Records - Volume II - Quarter Eagles" his average grade at the time (1975) was VF29.

1842 $2.50 AU50 PCGS #7723

Rare (50-60 known per PCGS). As Garrett and Guth state in their "Encyclopedia Of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933", "As the tiny mintage suggests, the 1842 Liberty Head quarter eagle is a major rarity in any grade...A review of other auction records reveals that this date is seldom offered for sale in any grade... The 1842 quarter eagle is still very rare, much more so than many of the more popular Southern mint issues." David Akers' "An Analysis Of Auction Records - Volume II - Quarter Eagles" his average grade at the time (1975) was VF29.

1844 $2.50 VF30 PCGS #7734

As Garrett and Guth state in their Encyclopedia, "the 1844 quarter eagle is rare in any grade."

1844 $2.50 VF30 PCGS #7734

As Garrett and Guth state in their Encyclopedia, "the 1844 quarter eagle is rare in any grade."

1844 $2.50 VF30 PCGS #7734

As Garrett and Guth state in their Encyclopedia, "the 1844 quarter eagle is rare in any grade."

1851-O $2.50 XF45 PCGS #7762

Early die state with full re-punched date. The photos included appear to show a doubled mint mark. I say "appear" because I can not find any reference to a re-punched mint mark in any of the literature and have not found any additional photos suggesting that a doubled mint mark exists. That said, Walter Breen in his Monograph on Quarter Eagles, pg 24, states that 4 reverse dies were supplied and that 2 mint mark locations have been observed. A second mint mark location, however, is not indicated in Douglas Winter's "Gold Coins Of The New Orleans Mint". Given the large mintage it is possible, maybe even likely, that multiple reverse dies were used during production. It is also possible that this arc inside the mint mark was caused by an errant fiber or burr caught in the die. The reverse impression is very heavy with the bevels on the legend and devices meeting in many areas, i.e. arrow head and last A in America, D and period, fraction bar and numbers, olive branch leaf and U in UNITED.

1851-O $2.50 XF45 PCGS #7762

Early die state with full re-punched date. The photos included appear to show a doubled mint mark. I say "appear" because I can not find any reference to a re-punched mint mark in any of the literature and have not found any additional photos suggesting that a doubled mint mark exists. That said, Walter Breen in his Monograph on Quarter Eagles, pg 24, states that 4 reverse dies were supplied and that 2 mint mark locations have been observed. A second mint mark location, however, is not indicated in Douglas Winter's "Gold Coins Of The New Orleans Mint". Given the large mintage it is possible, maybe even likely, that multiple reverse dies were used during production. It is also possible that this arc inside the mint mark was caused by an errant fiber or burr caught in the die. The reverse impression is very heavy with the bevels on the legend and devices meeting in many areas, i.e. arrow head and last A in America, D and period, fraction bar and numbers, olive branch leaf and U in UNITED.

1851-O $2.50 XF45 PCGS #7762

Early die state with full re-punched date. The photos included appear to show a doubled mint mark. I say "appear" because I can not find any reference to a re-punched mint mark in any of the literature and have not found any additional photos suggesting that a doubled mint mark exists. That said, Walter Breen in his Monograph on Quarter Eagles, pg 24, states that 4 reverse dies were supplied and that 2 mint mark locations have been observed. A second mint mark location, however, is not indicated in Douglas Winter's "Gold Coins Of The New Orleans Mint". Given the large mintage it is possible, maybe even likely, that multiple reverse dies were used during production. It is also possible that this arc inside the mint mark was caused by an errant fiber or burr caught in the die. The reverse impression is very heavy with the bevels on the legend and devices meeting in many areas, i.e. arrow head and last A in America, D and period, fraction bar and numbers, olive branch leaf and U in UNITED.

1851-O $2.50 XF45 PCGS #7762

Early die state with full re-punched date. The photos included appear to show a doubled mint mark. I say "appear" because I can not find any reference to a re-punched mint mark in any of the literature and have not found any additional photos suggesting that a doubled mint mark exists. That said, Walter Breen in his Monograph on Quarter Eagles, pg 24, states that 4 reverse dies were supplied and that 2 mint mark locations have been observed. A second mint mark location, however, is not indicated in Douglas Winter's "Gold Coins Of The New Orleans Mint". Given the large mintage it is possible, maybe even likely, that multiple reverse dies were used during production. It is also possible that this arc inside the mint mark was caused by an errant fiber or burr caught in the die. The reverse impression is very heavy with the bevels on the legend and devices meeting in many areas, i.e. arrow head and last A in America, D and period, fraction bar and numbers, olive branch leaf and U in UNITED.

1851-O $2.50 XF45 PCGS #7762

Early die state with full re-punched date. The photos included appear to show a doubled mint mark. I say "appear" because I can not find any reference to a re-punched mint mark in any of the literature and have not found any additional photos suggesting that a doubled mint mark exists. That said, Walter Breen in his Monograph on Quarter Eagles, pg 24, states that 4 reverse dies were supplied and that 2 mint mark locations have been observed. A second mint mark location, however, is not indicated in Douglas Winter's "Gold Coins Of The New Orleans Mint". Given the large mintage it is possible, maybe even likely, that multiple reverse dies were used during production. It is also possible that this arc inside the mint mark was caused by an errant fiber or burr caught in the die. The reverse impression is very heavy with the bevels on the legend and devices meeting in many areas, i.e. arrow head and last A in America, D and period, fraction bar and numbers, olive branch leaf and U in UNITED.

1851-O $2.50 XF45 PCGS #7762

Early die state with full re-punched date. The photos included appear to show a doubled mint mark. I say "appear" because I can not find any reference to a re-punched mint mark in any of the literature and have not found any additional photos suggesting that a doubled mint mark exists. That said, Walter Breen in his Monograph on Quarter Eagles, pg 24, states that 4 reverse dies were supplied and that 2 mint mark locations have been observed. A second mint mark location, however, is not indicated in Douglas Winter's "Gold Coins Of The New Orleans Mint". Given the large mintage it is possible, maybe even likely, that multiple reverse dies were used during production. It is also possible that this arc inside the mint mark was caused by an errant fiber or burr caught in the die. The reverse impression is very heavy with the bevels on the legend and devices meeting in many areas, i.e. arrow head and last A in America, D and period, fraction bar and numbers, olive branch leaf and U in UNITED.

1855 $2.50 MS62 PCGS #7774

Garrett and Guth in their "Encyclopedia Of U.S. Gold Coins" indicate, "The 1855 quarter eagle is seen much less often than the Philadelphia quarter eagles from 1851 to 1854... This date is generally well struck, with the exception of weakness on the eagle's left leg." Minor die clash at Eagle's right facing shoulder and left facing wing near the beak.

1855 $2.50 MS62 PCGS #7774

Garrett and Guth in their "Encyclopedia Of U.S. Gold Coins" indicate, "The 1855 quarter eagle is seen much less often than the Philadelphia quarter eagles from 1851 to 1854... This date is generally well struck, with the exception of weakness on the eagle's left leg." Minor die clash at Eagle's right facing shoulder and left facing wing near the beak.

1855 $2.50 MS62 PCGS #7774

Garrett and Guth in their "Encyclopedia Of U.S. Gold Coins" indicate, "The 1855 quarter eagle is seen much less often than the Philadelphia quarter eagles from 1851 to 1854... This date is generally well struck, with the exception of weakness on the eagle's left leg." Minor die clash at Eagle's right facing shoulder and left facing wing near the beak.

1856 $2.50 MS63 PCGS #7777

Per Garrett and Guth's "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933", "The size of the date on 1856 quarter eagles is much smaller than on previous issues from the Philadelphia Mint. Like the 1855 quarter eagle, the 1856 is unremarkable in circulated condition but becomes quite scarce in higher grades. Choice and gem examples are far rarer than later dates for this denomination... This date is usually well struck, and examples with moderate die scratches are sometimes seen." This coin does not show any die scratches but does have a small die rust spot at the jaw/neck. This appears to be common as the photo in Garrett and Guth's "Encyclopedia" of the Smithsonian coin shows the same spot.

1856 $2.50 MS63 PCGS #7777

Per Garrett and Guth's "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933", "The size of the date on 1856 quarter eagles is much smaller than on previous issues from the Philadelphia Mint. Like the 1855 quarter eagle, the 1856 is unremarkable in circulated condition but becomes quite scarce in higher grades. Choice and gem examples are far rarer than later dates for this denomination... This date is usually well struck, and examples with moderate die scratches are sometimes seen." This coin does not show any die scratches but does have a small die rust spot at the jaw/neck. This appears to be common as the photo in Garrett and Guth's "Encyclopedia" of the Smithsonian coin shows the same spot.

1861-S $2.50 AU55 PCGS #7795

Garrett and Guth state in their "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933", "The 1861-S quarter eagle is another issue with a moderately low mintage that was heavily circulated and has few survivors. This date is usually seen heavily worn and becomes increasingly rare in higher grades... The 1861-S quarter eagle does not garner much attention, but can be extremely difficult to locate in any grade." "Walter Breen's Complete Encyclopedia of U.S. And Colonial Coins" asserts, "'Type 1' rev. Very scarce. One obv. shipped Nov. 1860, one June 1861: leftover revs. from 1856. Much rarer in all grades than mintage figure suggests; usually weak VF, Ex. rare in EF, unknown UNC." Since his book was published in 1988, as many as 11 uncirculated coins may exist although PCGS suggests only 4 in MS60 and above. I have found 3 distinct reverse dies were used, identified by the location of the mint mark. The first has the mint mark slanted right with the lower serif of the S almost touching the fraction bar (see PCGS website MS62+ photo). The second is more upright and positioned above the upper serif of the D (see PCGS website AU58 photos). The third has the mint mark positioned left between the 1 in the fraction and the fraction bar (see NGC website sn 3516516-010 AU55)(This appears to be the rarest of the three and its the best photo I could find - sorry). This coin has the upright mint mark above the D upper serif. There is also a contact mark (point) between stars 7 and 8. Pedigree: Maurice Storck Collection (2020)

1861-S $2.50 AU55 PCGS #7795

Garrett and Guth state in their "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933", "The 1861-S quarter eagle is another issue with a moderately low mintage that was heavily circulated and has few survivors. This date is usually seen heavily worn and becomes increasingly rare in higher grades... The 1861-S quarter eagle does not garner much attention, but can be extremely difficult to locate in any grade." "Walter Breen's Complete Encyclopedia of U.S. And Colonial Coins" asserts, "'Type 1' rev. Very scarce. One obv. shipped Nov. 1860, one June 1861: leftover revs. from 1856. Much rarer in all grades than mintage figure suggests; usually weak VF, Ex. rare in EF, unknown UNC." Since his book was published in 1988, as many as 11 uncirculated coins may exist although PCGS suggests only 4 in MS60 and above. I have found 3 distinct reverse dies were used, identified by the location of the mint mark. The first has the mint mark slanted right with the lower serif of the S almost touching the fraction bar (see PCGS website MS62+ photo). The second is more upright and positioned above the upper serif of the D (see PCGS website AU58 photos). The third has the mint mark positioned left between the 1 in the fraction and the fraction bar (see NGC website sn 3516516-010 AU55)(This appears to be the rarest of the three and its the best photo I could find - sorry). This coin has the upright mint mark above the D upper serif. There is also a contact mark (point) between stars 7 and 8. Pedigree: Maurice Storck Collection (2020)

1861-S $2.50 AU55 PCGS #7795

Garrett and Guth state in their "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933", "The 1861-S quarter eagle is another issue with a moderately low mintage that was heavily circulated and has few survivors. This date is usually seen heavily worn and becomes increasingly rare in higher grades... The 1861-S quarter eagle does not garner much attention, but can be extremely difficult to locate in any grade." "Walter Breen's Complete Encyclopedia of U.S. And Colonial Coins" asserts, "'Type 1' rev. Very scarce. One obv. shipped Nov. 1860, one June 1861: leftover revs. from 1856. Much rarer in all grades than mintage figure suggests; usually weak VF, Ex. rare in EF, unknown UNC." Since his book was published in 1988, as many as 11 uncirculated coins may exist although PCGS suggests only 4 in MS60 and above. I have found 3 distinct reverse dies were used, identified by the location of the mint mark. The first has the mint mark slanted right with the lower serif of the S almost touching the fraction bar (see PCGS website MS62+ photo). The second is more upright and positioned above the upper serif of the D (see PCGS website AU58 photos). The third has the mint mark positioned left between the 1 in the fraction and the fraction bar (see NGC website sn 3516516-010 AU55)(This appears to be the rarest of the three and its the best photo I could find - sorry). This coin has the upright mint mark above the D upper serif. There is also a contact mark (point) between stars 7 and 8. Pedigree: Maurice Storck Collection (2020)

1862 $2.50 AU58 PCGS #7796

Garrett and Guth in their "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933" state, "The mintage of the 1862 quarter eagle dropped considerably at the Philadelphia Mint from the previous year. Even with a rather substantial production of nearly 100,000 coins, this date is scarce in all grades. The 1862 quarter eagle is many, many times rarer than the 1861. Gold coinage after the start of the Civil War did not circulate with regularity, and many great rarities were produced during this era. Most of the examples seen of this date are well struck, some with die clashes visible on one or both sides." Subtle die clashing on this coin can be seen with the aid of a loupe.

1862 $2.50 AU58 PCGS #7796

Garrett and Guth in their "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933" state, "The mintage of the 1862 quarter eagle dropped considerably at the Philadelphia Mint from the previous year. Even with a rather substantial production of nearly 100,000 coins, this date is scarce in all grades. The 1862 quarter eagle is many, many times rarer than the 1861. Gold coinage after the start of the Civil War did not circulate with regularity, and many great rarities were produced during this era. Most of the examples seen of this date are well struck, some with die clashes visible on one or both sides." Subtle die clashing on this coin can be seen with the aid of a loupe.

1862 $2.50 AU58 PCGS #7796

Garrett and Guth in their "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933" state, "The mintage of the 1862 quarter eagle dropped considerably at the Philadelphia Mint from the previous year. Even with a rather substantial production of nearly 100,000 coins, this date is scarce in all grades. The 1862 quarter eagle is many, many times rarer than the 1861. Gold coinage after the start of the Civil War did not circulate with regularity, and many great rarities were produced during this era. Most of the examples seen of this date are well struck, some with die clashes visible on one or both sides." Subtle die clashing on this coin can be seen with the aid of a loupe.

1867 $2.50 AU58 PCGS #7805

David Akers' "United States Gold Coins - An Analysis of Auction records - Volume II Quarter Eagles 1796-1929" (1975) comments, "Very rare in all grades..." Walter Breen's "Complete Encyclopedia Of U.S. And Continental Coins" (1988) calls the 1867 Quarter Eagle, "Rare... Business strikes (Jan. 22) have hollows (polished areas) below BE and in and below ear." And most recently (2008) Garrett and Guth in their "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933" indicates, "The 1867 quarter eagle is scarce, if not truly rare, in all grades. Most of the examples seen are circulated to some degree, and this date is very rare in full Mint State... Most of the high-grade examples seen have at least partially prooflike surfaces." Garrett and Guth also indicates the "Finest Smithsonian Institution specimen: AU-55" This coin also shows field die stria (angling 11:00 to 5:00) below the nose, jaw, and at the date - similar to PCGS s/n 16403663 (MS61).

1867 $2.50 AU58 PCGS #7805

David Akers' "United States Gold Coins - An Analysis of Auction records - Volume II Quarter Eagles 1796-1929" (1975) comments, "Very rare in all grades..." Walter Breen's "Complete Encyclopedia Of U.S. And Continental Coins" (1988) calls the 1867 Quarter Eagle, "Rare... Business strikes (Jan. 22) have hollows (polished areas) below BE and in and below ear." And most recently (2008) Garrett and Guth in their "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933" indicates, "The 1867 quarter eagle is scarce, if not truly rare, in all grades. Most of the examples seen are circulated to some degree, and this date is very rare in full Mint State... Most of the high-grade examples seen have at least partially prooflike surfaces." Garrett and Guth also indicates the "Finest Smithsonian Institution specimen: AU-55" This coin also shows field die stria (angling 11:00 to 5:00) below the nose, jaw, and at the date - similar to PCGS s/n 16403663 (MS61).

1867 $2.50 AU58 PCGS #7805

David Akers' "United States Gold Coins - An Analysis of Auction records - Volume II Quarter Eagles 1796-1929" (1975) comments, "Very rare in all grades..." Walter Breen's "Complete Encyclopedia Of U.S. And Continental Coins" (1988) calls the 1867 Quarter Eagle, "Rare... Business strikes (Jan. 22) have hollows (polished areas) below BE and in and below ear." And most recently (2008) Garrett and Guth in their "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933" indicates, "The 1867 quarter eagle is scarce, if not truly rare, in all grades. Most of the examples seen are circulated to some degree, and this date is very rare in full Mint State... Most of the high-grade examples seen have at least partially prooflike surfaces." Garrett and Guth also indicates the "Finest Smithsonian Institution specimen: AU-55" This coin also shows field die stria (angling 11:00 to 5:00) below the nose, jaw, and at the date - similar to PCGS s/n 16403663 (MS61).

1869-S $2.50 MS61 PCGS #7810

Garrett and Guth's "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins" comments, "Quarter eagles from the San Francisco Mint of this era all share common themes - they are usually found well worn and are rare in high grade. The 1869-S is no exception, as most of the coins are found for this year are relatively low grade." David Akers, in his Auction Analysis of 1975 suggested, "Scarce as a date... Most specimens I have seen were very bluntly struck and have relatively little detail on the hair around Liberty's face or on the eagle's right leg and neck... grossly underpriced, particularly in choice condition." He gave the 1869-S quarter eagle an average grade of VF30 although the current graded population suggest a better average would be in the VF45-AU50 range.

1869-S $2.50 MS61 PCGS #7810

Garrett and Guth's "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins" comments, "Quarter eagles from the San Francisco Mint of this era all share common themes - they are usually found well worn and are rare in high grade. The 1869-S is no exception, as most of the coins are found for this year are relatively low grade." David Akers, in his Auction Analysis of 1975 suggested, "Scarce as a date... Most specimens I have seen were very bluntly struck and have relatively little detail on the hair around Liberty's face or on the eagle's right leg and neck... grossly underpriced, particularly in choice condition." He gave the 1869-S quarter eagle an average grade of VF30 although the current graded population suggest a better average would be in the VF45-AU50 range.

1871-S $2.50 MS62 PCGS #7814

This coin shows a deep orange patina with touches of lavender suggesting an overabundance of copper and some silver in the chemistry.

1871-S $2.50 MS62 PCGS #7814

This coin shows a deep orange patina with touches of lavender suggesting an overabundance of copper and some silver in the chemistry.

1878 $2.50 MS64 PCGS #7828

Walter Breen in his "Complete Encyclopedia of U.S. And Colonial Coins" pg 498, number 6239, states, Minor positional vars.; one with traces of re-punching on the 1, and round hollow atop second shield stripe (center punch in hub?)". The re-punching of the 1 in the date consists of a very, very small tick below the upper serif and a slightly thicker lower left serif. Garrett and Guth's "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933" asserts, "Uncirculated examples of the 1857 quarter eagle become scarce starting at the MS60 level. Choice and gem coins are offered very infrequently."

1878 $2.50 MS64 PCGS #7828

Walter Breen in his "Complete Encyclopedia of U.S. And Colonial Coins" pg 498, number 6239, states, Minor positional vars.; one with traces of re-punching on the 1, and round hollow atop second shield stripe (center punch in hub?)". The re-punching of the 1 in the date consists of a very, very small tick below the upper serif and a slightly thicker lower left serif. Garrett and Guth's "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933" asserts, "Uncirculated examples of the 1857 quarter eagle become scarce starting at the MS60 level. Choice and gem coins are offered very infrequently."

1891 $2.50 MS64 PCGS #7843

All 1891 business strike coins that I have seen show doubling of the reverse even though many holder titles do not indicate it. This is especially true of the right side legend (OF AMERICA), the denomination D including the period and dot, the eagle's right wing, and the arrows heads. Early strikes tend to show doubling of the top arrow shaft, fraction bar and denominator 2 as well. Garrett and Guth's "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933" states, "The 1891 quarter eagle is a scarce, low-mintage date. In grades up to gem Uncirculated, the 1891 commands little or no premium over more common dates. This is difficult to understand, as the 1891 quarter eagle is many times rarer than any of the later-date issues. Gem examples are very rare, with just a few graded at that level."

1891 $2.50 MS64 PCGS #7843

All 1891 business strike coins that I have seen show doubling of the reverse even though many holder titles do not indicate it. This is especially true of the right side legend (OF AMERICA), the denomination D including the period and dot, the eagle's right wing, and the arrows heads. Early strikes tend to show doubling of the top arrow shaft, fraction bar and denominator 2 as well. Garrett and Guth's "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933" states, "The 1891 quarter eagle is a scarce, low-mintage date. In grades up to gem Uncirculated, the 1891 commands little or no premium over more common dates. This is difficult to understand, as the 1891 quarter eagle is many times rarer than any of the later-date issues. Gem examples are very rare, with just a few graded at that level."

1891 $2.50 MS64 PCGS #7843

All 1891 business strike coins that I have seen show doubling of the reverse even though many holder titles do not indicate it. This is especially true of the right side legend (OF AMERICA), the denomination D including the period and dot, the eagle's right wing, and the arrows heads. Early strikes tend to show doubling of the top arrow shaft, fraction bar and denominator 2 as well. Garrett and Guth's "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933" states, "The 1891 quarter eagle is a scarce, low-mintage date. In grades up to gem Uncirculated, the 1891 commands little or no premium over more common dates. This is difficult to understand, as the 1891 quarter eagle is many times rarer than any of the later-date issues. Gem examples are very rare, with just a few graded at that level."

1896 $2.50 MS64 PCGS #7848

OGH. Deep orange-gold color.

1896 $2.50 MS64 PCGS #7848

OGH. Deep orange-gold color.