The Coastal Collection (Reeded edge halves) Coin Album

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1836 50C Reeded Edge AU55 PCGS #6175

GR-1. J-57, R2. With the introduction of steam presses and the reducing lathe the Mint was able to place all features on the working hubs (except the date) and ramp up production more quickly. Except for the date, all dies were identical. The era of quirky, hand-punched and engraved half dollar varieties had come to an end. Technology marched on. Chief Engraver Christian Gobrecht reworked the design for improved metal flow and the new presses. Minting did not begin until very late in the year and a small run of coins were pressed from a single die pair. For many years it was reported that this run was limited to 1200 pieces. However recent studies suggest a more correct mintage of 15-20,000 coins. The survival number today is between 500-1000. Their release into circulation was unexpected as the coin's revised design and size had not been approved by Congress. The 1836 reeded edge was considered a pattern by many. However, Congress enacted the new law in early 1837. And as these pieces met the requirements they were released into circulation. This specimen has pleasant surfaces, and a nicely toned, unspoiled appearance.

1836 50C Reeded Edge AU55 PCGS #6175

GR-1. J-57, R2. With the introduction of steam presses and the reducing lathe the Mint was able to place all features on the working hubs (except the date) and ramp up production more quickly. Except for the date, all dies were identical. The era of quirky, hand-punched and engraved half dollar varieties had come to an end. Technology marched on. Chief Engraver Christian Gobrecht reworked the design for improved metal flow and the new presses. Minting did not begin until very late in the year and a small run of coins were pressed from a single die pair. For many years it was reported that this run was limited to 1200 pieces. However recent studies suggest a more correct mintage of 15-20,000 coins. The survival number today is between 500-1000. Their release into circulation was unexpected as the coin's revised design and size had not been approved by Congress. The 1836 reeded edge was considered a pattern by many. However, Congress enacted the new law in early 1837. And as these pieces met the requirements they were released into circulation. This specimen has pleasant surfaces, and a nicely toned, unspoiled appearance.

1837 50C Reeded Edge AU58+ PCGS #6176

GR-17 (JR-20), R1. One of the more common varieties and easily available. The obverse is normally well struck but the reverse, even in EDS, shows a significant die crack from 6 o'clock to 11. The reverse die in this example is counter clockwise rotated about 30 degrees. The half has remarkable, vivid toning emphasizing sea blue and green, soft magenta, and fiery orange.

1837 50C Reeded Edge AU58+ PCGS #6176

GR-17 (JR-20), R1. One of the more common varieties and easily available. The obverse is normally well struck but the reverse, even in EDS, shows a significant die crack from 6 o'clock to 11. The reverse die in this example is counter clockwise rotated about 30 degrees. The half has remarkable, vivid toning emphasizing sea blue and green, soft magenta, and fiery orange.

1839 50C Reeded Edge Capped Bust, Large Letters AU58 PCGS #6179

GR-5, R2. A frosty, lustrous example of the last year in the series. Untoned and likely carefully dipped. Exceptional reverse strike and a weaker obverse. Some typical planchet roller marks but most subtle. (Was PCGS MS61, cert# 32919580)

1839 50C Reeded Edge Capped Bust, Large Letters AU58 PCGS #6179

GR-5, R2. A frosty, lustrous example of the last year in the series. Untoned and likely carefully dipped. Exceptional reverse strike and a weaker obverse. Some typical planchet roller marks but most subtle. (Was PCGS MS61, cert# 32919580)

1839-O 50C AU58 PCGS #6181

GR-1, R1.

1839-O 50C AU58 PCGS #6181

GR-1, R1.