The PCGS Million Dollar Coin Club™ Coins

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Regular Issue United States Coins

There are 64 regular issues (coins struck at the U.S. Mint as either circulation strikes or proofs) that are members of the PCGS Million Dollar Coin Club. Actually, a few of the coins are technically patterns, such as the 1907 Extremely High Relief $20 St. Gaudens, and a few are clandestine strikings, such as the 1913 Liberty nickel, but those coins are strongly associated with the regular issue series. Of these 64 issues, there are 173 specimens that are members of the Million Dollar Coin Club, 145 of them privately held. In denomination and date order they are:

1796 No Pole half cent, MS67RB (PCGS grade) - $1,750,000. This is the fabulous Eliasberg coin that sold at auction in 1996 for $506,000. PCGS Coin# 1031

1793 Chain cent “AMERI” variety (S-1), SP65 (PCGS grade) - $1,500,000. There are two examples of the 1793 Chain cent that are currently worth over $1,000,000. Both coins are from the incredible Ted Naftzger large cent collection, the finest ever assembled. The “AMERI” variety was graded SP65 by PCGS. Up from $1,250,000 last year. PCGS Coin# 1340

1793 Chain cent “Periods” variety (S-4), SP67 (PCGS grade) - $3,000,000. The “Periods” variety Chain cent from the Naftzger collection was graded SP67 by PCGS and is referred to by large cent aficionados as “THE coin.” Up from $2,200,000 last year. PCGS Coin# 1341

1793 Vine & Bars Wreath cent (S-5), SP68RD (PCGS grade) - $1,750,000. This is the fabulous Atwater-Naftzger specimen, the finest known Wreath cent by far. Up from $1,500,000 last year. PCGS Coin# 1349

1793 Liberty Cap large cent, MS64BN (PCGS grade) - $1,450,000. There were three types of large cents minted in 1793; the Chain cent, Wreath cent and Liberty Cap cent. All three are rare in all grades, but the 1793 Liberty Cap is the rarest of the three in Mint State condition. This is the finest known example. Up from $1,250,000 last year. PCGS Coin# 1359

1795 Reeded Edge large cent, VG10 (PCGS grade) - $1,265,000. The Mint experimented briefly with edge reeding in 1795 and not a lot is known about this issue. We do know there are seven survivors and this coin is the finest of the seven. The price is what this coin sold for at auction in September, 2009. PCGS Coin# 1383

1799 large cent, MS61BN (PCGS grade) - $1,000,000. This is a magic date for large cent collectors and this is the only Mint State specimen known. This coin was sold at auction in September, 2009 for $977,500 and we “rounded up!” PCGS Coin# 1443

1799/8 large cent, AU58 (PCGS grade) - $1,000,000. This is the overdate variety for the 1799 cent and the AU58 specimen is the finest known. PCGS Coin# 1446

1943-D copper cent, MS64 (PCGS grade) - $1,500,000. This coin is a new member of the Million Dollar Coin Club this year. Due to the wartime need for copper, most 1943 Lincoln cents were struck in zinc-coated steel. A few copper examples were struck at each of the three mints, but for the Denver Mint only one example is known and this unique piece sold in 2010 for a price well in excess of $1,000,000. PCGS Coin# 82712

1913 Liberty Nickel 1913 Liberty nickel - $2,000,000 to $4,500,000. The 1913 Liberty nickel is arguably the most famous United States rare coin. Only five were originally struck. Today, three of the five are privately held and two are in museums. PCGS Coin# 3912

1913 Liberty nickel, PR66 (PCGS grade) - $4,500,000
1913 Liberty nickel, PR64 (PCGS grade) - $3,750,000
1913 Liberty nickel, PR63 (estimated grade) - $3,000,000
1913 Liberty nickel (Smithsonian), PR62 (estimated grade) - $2,500,000
1913 Liberty nickel (ANA museum), PR55 (estimated grade) - $2,000,000

1792 half disme - $1,000,000 to $1,400,000. The 1792 silver half disme was the first coin officially struck by the United States Mint. An estimated 1,500 coins were struck and approximately 200 survive today. The two finest specimens, one graded MS67 and one graded SP67 by PCGS, are worth $1 million or more.

1792 half disme, SP67 (PCGS grade) - $1,400,000 PCGS Coin# 11024
1792 half disme, MS67 (PCGS grade) - $1,000,000 PCGS Coin# 11020

1870-S Liberty Seated half dime, MS64 (PCGS grade) - $1,750,000. This unique coin was discovered in a “junk” box in 1978. Quite a find! Up from $1,400,000 last year. PCGS Coin# 4397

1873-CC No Arrows Liberty Seated dime, MS65 (PCGS grade) - $1,500,000. This unique coin was the last coin Louis Eliasberg purchased (he bought it in 1950) to complete his collection. It is both the rarest United States dime and the rarest Carson City Mint issue of any denomination. PCGS Coin# 4661

1894-S Barber dime - $1,350,000 to $2,300,000. One of the most famous United States coin rarities. There were 24 originally struck and an estimated 10 survive today. The finest eight examples are million dollar coins. PCGS Coin# 4805

1894-S Barber dime, SP66BM (PCGS grade) - $2,300,000
1894-S Barber dime, SP66BM (PCGS grade) - $2,300,000
1894-S Barber dime, SP66BM (estimated grade) - $2,300,000
1894-S Barber dime, SP66BM (estimated grade) - $2,300,000
1796 Quarter, MS67 1894-S Barber dime, SP65BM (PCGS grade) - $1,800,000
1894-S Barber dime, SP64BM (PCGS grade) - $1,350,000
1894-S Barber dime, SP64BM (PCGS grade) - $1,350,000
1894-S Barber dime, SP64BM (PCGS grade) - $1,350,000

1796 quarter, MS67 (PCGS grade) - $1,200,000. The 1796 quarter was the first United States quarter and the only date in the 18th Century for which quarters were struck. The finest known example is an incredible PCGS-graded MS67. Up from $1,000,000 last year as all superb examples of early silver coins have very high demand now. PCGS Coin# 5310

1796 16 Stars Draped Bust half dollar, MS66 (PCGS grade) - $1,200,000. The 1796-1797 Draped Bust Small Eagle half dollar is the rarest United States silver type coin. This coin is the finest of the 1796-dated survivors. PCGS Coin# 6058

1797 Draped Bust half dollar, MS66 and MS65+ (two coins, both PCGS-graded) - $1,200,000 to $1,350,000. There are two superb survivors of the 1797-dated half dollar. Both up this year from $1,100,000 last year. PCGS Coin# 6060

1797 half dollar, MS66 (PCGS grade) - $1,350,000
1797 half dollar, MS65+ (PCGS grade) - $1,200,000

1794 Flowing Hair silver dollar - $1,500,000 to $7,850,000. The 1794 was the first United States silver dollar and a mere 1,758 coins were originally struck. Today, a little over 100 survive in all grades. The six finest examples are worth over $1 million each.

1794 silver dollar, SP66 (PCGS grade) - $7,850,000 PCGS Coin# 86851
1794 silver dollar, MS66 (PCGS grade) - $3,750,000 PCGS Coin# 6851
1794 silver dollar, MS66 (PCGS grade) - $3,750,000
1794 silver dollar, MS64 (PCGS grade) - $2,000,000
1794 silver dollar, MS63+ (PCGS grade) - $1,250,000
1794 silver dollar, MS62+ (PCGS grade) - $1,000,000

1795 Flowing Hair silver dollar, MS66 (PCGS grade) - $1,100,000. This is the finest known example of the 1795-dated Flowing Hair dollar design. PCGS Coin# 6852

1801 Proof Bust dollar - $1,250,000 to $1,600,000. In about 1858, a small handful of proof Bust dollars dated 1801, 1802 and 1803 were restruck at the Mint, then concealed and sold to collectors some 20 years later. Of the three dates restruck, the 1801 is by far the rarest with as few as three to five examples that may exist today. Today, there are several serious buyers after this issue but none have appeared on the market and we’ve raised the price of each several hundred thousand dollars. PCGS Coin# 6904

1801 Bust dollar, PR64 (estimated grade) - $1,600,000
1801 Bust dollar, PR63 (estimated grade) - $1,250,000

1803 Proof Bust dollar, PR66CAM (PCGS grade) - $1,000,000. This is the finest known of the 1803-dated proof Bust dollars. PCGS Coin# 86906

1804 Silver dollar - $1,800,000 to $7,500,000. The two most famous United States rare coins are the 1913 Liberty nickel and the 1804 silver dollar. A small handful of the 1804 silver dollars were struck (actually beginning in 1834 and back-dated) for presentation to dignitaries including the King of Siam and the Sultan of Muscat. Then 20 or so years later, another batch of 1804 dollars was struck to sell to collectors. Today, there are 15 1804 silver dollars known and they are all million dollar coins.

1804 Silver Dollar 1804 silver dollar, “Original” or Class I, PR68 (PCGS grade) - $7,500,000
1804 silver dollar, “Original” or Class I, PR67 (PCGS grade) - $6,500,000
1804 silver dollar, “Original” or Class I, PR65 (PCGS grade) - $5,500,000
1804 silver dollar, “Original” or Class I, PR65 (PCGS grade) - $5,500,000
1804 silver dollar, “Original” or Class I, PR64 (estimated grade) - $4,500,000
1804 silver dollar, “Original” or Class I, PR62 (estimated grade) - $3,500,000
1804 silver dollar, “Original” or Class I (Smithsonian), PR58 (estimated grade) - $2,500,000
1804 silver dollar, “Original” or Class I (ANA museum), PR30 (estimated grade) - $1,850,000
PCGS Coin# 6907
1804 silver dollar, “Restrike” or Class II (Smithsonian), PR63 (estimated grade) - $4,500,000
PCGS Coin# 414488
1804 silver dollar, “Restrike” or Class III (Smithsonian), PR63 (estimated grade) - $3,500,000
1804 silver dollar, “Restrike” or Class III (ANA museum), PR60 (estimated grade) - $2,500,000
1804 silver dollar, “Restrike” or Class III, PR58 (PCGS grade) - $2,300,000
1804 silver dollar, “Restrike” or Class III, PR55 (estimated grade) - $2,100,000
1804 silver dollar, “Restrike” or Class III, PR40 (estimated grade) - $1,800,000
1804 silver dollar, “Restrike” or Class III (ANS museum), PR40 (estimated grade) - $1,800,000
PCGS Coin# 6908

1870-S Liberty Seated dollar - $1,000,000 to $2,500,000. This is the rarest Liberty Seated silver dollar with just 12 known survivors. The three finest known examples are million dollar coins. PCGS Coin# 6965

1870-S Liberty Seated dollar, MS62 (PCGS grade) - $2,500,000
1870-S Liberty Seated dollar, AU58 (PCGS grade) - $1,750,000
1870-S Liberty Seated dollar, AU53 (PCGS grade) - $1,000,000

1885 Trade dollar - $1,250,000 to $3,250,000. The 1885 Trade dollar is one of the most famous United States rare coins. Only five examples were originally struck. PCGS Coin# 7065

1885 Trade dollar, PR66 (estimated grade) - $3,250,000
1885 Trade dollar, PR63 (estimated grade) - $2,000,000
1885 Trade dollar, PR62 (PCGS grade) - $1,750,000
1885 Trade dollar, PR61 (PCGS grade) - $1,500,000
1885 Trade dollar, PR60 (estimated grade) - $1,250,000

1893-S Morgan dollar, MS67 (PCGS grade) - $1,000,000. The 1893-S is the rarest coin in the most popular United States coin series. There is one lone ultra-superb Gem example, a gorgeous MS67. PCGS Coin# 7226

1796 No Stars $2.5 Gold Piece

1796 No Stars $2.5 gold piece, MS65 (two coins, one PCGS-graded and one an estimated grade) - $1,750,000. The first United States $2.5 gold piece and the first type had no stars on the obverse. A mere 963 “No Stars” examples were struck. The two finest survivors are worth well over a million dollars each. PCGS Coin# 7645

1796 With Stars $2.5 gold piece, MS65 (estimated grade) - $1,000,000. Only 427 of the 1796 With Stars variety were originally struck. The finest specimen is a million dollar coin today. PCGS Coin# 7647

1808 Capped Bust $2.5 gold piece, MS65 (PCGS grade) - $1,500,000. The 1808 $2.5 gold piece type was only made for one year. Just 2,710 were originally struck and about 100 or so exist today in all grades. The finest surviving example is a PCGS-graded Gem MS65. Up from $1,250,000 last year. PCGS Coin# 7660

1870-S $3 gold piece, EF40 (estimated grade) - $4,000,000. There is only one known specimen. Louis Eliasberg purchased this coin in 1945 for approximately $11,000. When his gold coins were auctioned in 1982, this coin was sold for $687,500 to Harry Bass and it remains in the Bass collection today. PCGS Coin# 7992

1879 Coiled Hair $4 gold Stella, PR67 (PCGS grade) - $1,000,000. The $4 Stellas are technically pattern coins, but they have long been collected as part of the regular issue proof gold series. There are two types of Stellas and the Coiled Hair type is much rarer than the Flowing Hair type. The 1880 Coiled Hair Stella is the rarest $4 Stella and the 1879 Coiled Hair is the second rarest. The finest known 1879 Coiled Hair is a Superb Gem PCGS-graded specimen. PCGS Coin# 8058

1880 Coiled Hair $4 gold Stella - $1,000,000 to $1,400,000. The 1880 Coiled Hair is the rarest of the four types of $4 gold Stellas. Between eight and ten were originally struck and perhaps as few as five survive.

1880 Coiled Hair $4 Stella, PR66CAM (estimated grade) - $1,400,000
1880 Coiled Hair $4 Stella, PR66CAM (estimated grade) - $1,400,000
PCGS Coin# 88060
1880 Coiled Hair $4 Stella, PR66 (PCGS grade) - $1,300,000
1880 Coiled Hair $4 Stella, PR65 (PCGS grade) - $1,000,000
1880 Coiled Hair $4 Stella, PR65 (PCGS grade) - $1,000,000
PCGS Coin# 8060

1798 Draped Bust, Small Eagle $5, AU55 (estimated grade) - $1,000,000. This is the finest of the only seven known examples of this early gold rarity and it’s a new addition to the Million Dollar Coin Club. PCGS Coin# 8071

1815 $5, MS65 (PCGS grade) - $1,000,000. Only a dozen or so examples are known of this famous early gold rarity and this is by far the finest known. New to the Million Dollar Coin Club this year, but it should have been on last year’s list…an oversight on our part. PCGS Coin# 8118

1820 Curved 2 Large Letters $5 gold Proof, PR65 (estimated grade) - $1,500,000. A unique early proof gold coin, in fact, the first United States Mint proof gold issue. From the Norweb collection and now in the Harry Bass collection. PCGS Coin# 8141

1822 $5 Gold Piece 1821 $5 gold piece Proof, PR65 (two coins, estimated grades) - $1,000,000. There are only two known proofs of this date and actually they are both “one-sided proofs.” One coin is in the Smithsonian and one is in the Harry Bass collection. PCGS Coin# 8142

1822 $5 gold piece, three coins - $5,000,000 to $6,000,000. There were 17,796 $5 gold pieces struck in 1822 but only three survive today. Two are now in the Smithsonian Institution and the finest of the three is now in a private collection. The last sale was in the October, 1982 auction of the Louis Eliasberg gold coin collection where the EF45 specimen realized a then-record $687,500. Our pricing experts feel it would bring nearly ten times that price today. PCGS Coin# 8130

1822 $5 gold piece, EF45 (estimated grade) - $6,000,000.
1822 $5 gold piece (Smithsonian), EF40 (estimated grade) - $5,500,000.
1822 $5 gold piece (Smithsonian), VF35 (estimated grade) - $5,000,000.

1825/1 $5 gold piece Proof, PR65 (two coins, estimated grades) - $1,000,000. There are only two known proofs of this date. One example is in the Smithsonian and the other is in the Harry Bass collection. PCGS Coin# 8145

1825/4 $5 gold piece, MS63 (estimated grade) - $1,500,000. There are only two known examples of this variety of 1825 $5 gold piece and the finer of the two is definitely a million dollar coin. Up from $1,250,000 last year. PCGS Coin# 8134

1826 $5 gold piece Proof, PR67 (estimated grade) - $2,000,000. This unique proof is impounded in the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. PCGS Coin# 8146

1828 $5 gold piece Proof, PR65 (estimated grade) - $1,500,000. A possibly unique proof in the Smithsonian. PCGS Coin# 8148

1829 Large Size $5 gold piece, MS66 (PCGS grade) - $1,000,000. The finest of approximately seven known specimens. PCGS Coin# 8139

1829 Large Size $5 gold piece Proof, PR67 (estimated grade) - $2,000,000. A unique one-sided proof in the Harry Bass collection. PCGS Coin# 8149

1829 Small Size $5 gold piece, MS65 (PCGS grade) - $1,000,000. The finest of six or seven known survivors. PCGS Coin# 8151

1829 Small Size $5 gold piece Proof, PR66 (two coins, estimated grades) - $1,500,000. There are two known proofs, one in the Smithsonian and one in the Harry Bass collection. PCGS Coin# 8163

1831 $5 gold piece Proof, PR65 (estimated grade) - $1,000,000. Possibly unique proof tracing its pedigree to the fabulous Parmelee collection. PCGS Coin# 8165

1832 $5, 12 stars, MS63 (PCGS grade) - $1,500,000. Only five known examples of this major gold rarity and this is the only mint state specimen known. PCGS Coin# 8155

1833 $5 gold piece Proof, PR67 (PCGS grade) - $1,400,000. This mind-boggling Gem is by the far the finer of the two known survivors. Its great pedigree includes Parmelee, Woodin, King Farouk and John Pittman. Up from $1,250,000 last year. PCGS Coin# 8167

1844-O $5 Liberty gold piece Branch Mint Proof, SP65BM (estimated grade) - $1,500,000. A unique branch mint proof from the New Orleans Mint. Pedigree is Parmelee to Woodin to King Farouk to dealer Abe Kosoff who sold the coin to a collector in 1959 for $15,000 and the coin has not been on the market since then. PCGS Coin# 8456

1854-S $5 Liberty 1854-S $5 Liberty - $1,500,000 to $2,750,000. A mere 268 San Francisco Mint $5 gold pieces were struck in 1854 and just three survive today. All three have gone up in value during the past year. PCGS Coin# 8260

1854-S $5 Liberty (Ex-Eliasberg), AU58 (estimated grade) - $2,750,000
1854-S $5 Liberty (Ex-Norweb), EF45 (estimated grade) - $1,750,000
1854-S $5 Liberty, EF40 (estimated grade) - $1,500,000

1795 13 Leaves $10 gold piece - $1,000,000 to $1,500,000. The 1795 was the first United States $10 gold piece and there are three spectacular specimens that survive today. PCGS Coin# 8551

1795 13 Leaves $10 gold piece, MS66 (PCGS grade) - $1,500,000
1795 13 Leaves $10 gold piece, MS65 (PCGS grade) - $1,000,000
1795 13 Leaves $10 gold piece, MS65 (PCGS grade) - $1,000,000

1804 Draped Bust $10 gold piece Proof - $3,000,000 to $4,750,000. The 1804 $10 gold proofs were struck at the same time as the “Original, Class I” 1804 silver dollars, i.e. 1836. One example is still in the King of Siam proof set. Four proofs were originally struck. It is unclear whether three of the four or all four exist today. The finest example sold last year for nearly $5 million. All three known examples are way up in value during the past year. PCGS Coin# 8570

1804 $10 gold Proof, PR65DCAM (estimated grade) - $4,750,000
1804 $10 gold Proof, PR64CAM (PCGS grade) - $3,500,000
1804 $10 gold Proof, PR61 (estimated grade) - $3,000,000

1838 $10 Liberty gold piece Proof, PR65 (three coins, two PCGS-graded and one estimated grade) - $1,750,000. It is not known how many proof examples of the first year of issue for $10 Liberties were struck, but it is known that only three exist today. PCGS Coin# 8770

1838 $10 Liberty gold Proof, PR65 (PCGS grade) - $1,750,000
1838 $10 Liberty gold Proof, PR65 (PCGS grade) - $1,750,000
1838 $10 Liberty gold Proof, PR65 (estimated grade) - $1,750,000

1839 $10 Liberty gold piece Proof - $1,800,000 to $2,000,000. There are three known proofs of the 1839 $10 Liberty gold piece, two of which our experts valued at over $1 million each. PCGS Coin# 8771

1839 $10 Liberty gold Proof, PR67DCAM (estimated grade) - $2,000,000
1839 $10 Liberty gold Proof (Smithsonian), PR66DCAM (estimated grade) - $1,800,000

1844-O $10 Liberty gold piece Branch Mint Proof, SP64BM (PCGS grade) - $1,500,000. A unique branch mint proof from the New Orleans Mint. Like the 1844-O $5 branch mint proof, the pedigree traces back to the Parmelee collection. PCGS Coin# 8803

1907 $10 Indian gold piece, PR67 to PR68 (estimated grade) - $2,185,000. The newest member of the Million Dollar Coin Club is a newly “discovered,” unique satin proof example of the famous “Rolled Edge” 1907 $10 Indian. This fabulous coin was unknown to the numismatic community until this year when it sold at auction in January for $2,185,000. PCGS Coin# 505272

1920-S $10 Indian gold piece, MS67 (PCGS grade) - $1,500,000. The 1920-S is one of the rarities in the $10 Indian series and an ultra rarity in Gem condition. The superb PCGS-graded MS67 is the finest known. 20th Century gold coin collector Dr. Steven Duckor purchased this coin at auction in 1979 for $35,000 and sold it at auction in 2007 for $1,725,000. PCGS Coin# 8881

1849 $20 Liberty gold piece, PR64 (PCGS estimated grade) - $20,000,000. The first $20 gold piece struck at the U.S. Mint. This piece is struck in proof and is unique. This incredible piece of numismatic history is in the Smithsonian Institution. When we asked coin trader extraordinaire Kevin Lipton what he thought this coin was worth, his answer was, “The most.” When Kevin was doing his pricing input for the Million Dollar Coin Club he called this ultra rarity “The coin.” Last year we had “The coin” priced at $15 million. This year all of our experts felt that it would bring at least $20 million if ever auctioned. PCGS Coin# 71908

1856-O $20 Liberty Gold Piece 1854-S $20 Liberty gold piece Branch Mint Proof, SP66BM (estimated grade) - $1,500,000. The unique proof struck in the first year of operation of the San Francisco Mint (and probably the first $20 gold piece struck that year) is now in the Smithsonian. PCGS Coin# 415629

1856-O $20 Liberty gold piece Branch Mint Proof, SP63BM (PCGS grade) - $1,500,000. A unique branch mint proof example of an issue that’s extremely rare in any grade and unknown as a regular strike in Mint State condition. Sold at auction in 2009 for $1,437,500. We think it would bring more today. PCGS Coin# 409828

1861 Paquet Reverse $20 Liberty gold piece - $2,000,000 to $3,500,000. There are only two known survivors of the regular strikes. PCGS Coin# 8933

1861 Paquet $20 Liberty gold piece, MS67 (estimated grade) - $3,500,000
1861 Paquet $20 Liberty gold piece, MS61 (PCGS grade) - $2,000,000

1907 Extremely High Relief $20 Saint-Gaudens gold piece - $2,000,000 to $3,000,000. This coin, technically a pattern, was Saint-Gaudens’ initial design for the new $20 gold piece. The design was not commercially viable and the relief was modified twice. There were approximately 24 examples of the initial Extremely High Relief design struck, with four minor variations. Today, there are 19 traced survivors, all but one of them extremely high quality. This is considered by many to be the most beautiful coin ever struck at the United States Mint.

1907 Ex. High Relief $20, lettered edge PR69 (PCGS grade) - $3,000,000
1907 Ex. High Relief $20, lettered edge PR68 (PCGS grade) - $2,400,000
1907 Ex. High Relief $20, lettered edge PR68 (PCGS grade) - $2,400,000
1907 Ex. High Relief $20, lettered edge PR68 (PCGS grade) - $2,400,000
1907 Ex. High Relief $20, lettered edge PR67 (PCGS grade) - $2,000,000
1907 Ex. High Relief $20, lettered edge PR67 (PCGS grade) - $2,000,000
1907 Ex. High Relief $20, lettered edge PR67 (estimated grade) - $2,000,000
1907 Ex. High Relief $20, lettered edge PR67 (estimated grade) - $2,000,000
1907 Ex. High Relief $20, lettered edge PR67 (estimated grade) - $2,000,000
1907 Ex. High Relief $20, lettered edge PR67 (estimated grade) - $2,000,000
1907 Ex. High Relief $20, lettered edge PR67 (estimated grade) - $2,000,000
1907 Ex. High Relief $20, lettered edge (Smithsonian) PR67 (estimated grade) - $2,000,000
1907 Ex. High Relief $20, lettered edge (Smithsonian) PR67 (estimated grade) - $2,000,000
PCGS Coin# 9131
1907 Ex. High Relief $20, inverted edge letters PR68 (PCGS grade) - $2,500,000
1907 Ex. High Relief $20, inverted edge letters PR67 (estimated grade) - $2,200,000
PCGS Coin# 9132
1907 Ex. High Relief $20, sans serif edge PR67 (estimated grade) - $2,200,000
PCGS Coin# 81954
1907 Ex. High Relief $20, plain edge PR67 (estimated grade) - $2,500,000
PCGS Coin# 9130

1921 $20 Saint-Gaudens gold piece - $1,000,000 to $1,400,000. The 1921 is the premier condition rarity in the $20 Saint-Gaudens series. The four finest known specimens are million dollar coins. PCGS Coin# 9172

1921 $20 St. Gaudens, MS66 (PCGS grade) - $1,400,000
1921 $20 St. Gaudens, MS65 (PCGS grade) - $1,000,000
1921 $20 St. Gaudens, MS65 (PCGS grade) - $1,000,000
1921 $20 St. Gaudens, MS65 (PCGS grade) - $1,000,000

1927-D $20 Saint-Gaudens gold piece - $1,000,000 to $2,200,000. Other than the 1933, the 1927-D is the rarest $20 Saint-Gaudens. There are approximately 12 to 15 known and the finest nine are million dollar coins. PCGS Coin# 9187

1927-D $20 St. Gaudens, MS67 (PCGS grade) - $2,200,000
1927-D $20 St. Gaudens, MS66 (PCGS grade) - $1,600,000
1927-D $20 St. Gaudens, MS66 (PCGS grade) - $1,600,000
1927-D $20 St. Gaudens, MS66 (PCGS grade) - $1,600,000
1927-D $20 St. Gaudens, MS66 (PCGS grade) - $1,600,000
1927-D $20 St. Gaudens, MS65 (estimated grade) - $1,300,000
1927-D $20 St. Gaudens (Smithsonian), MS65 (estimated grade) - $1,300,000
1927-D $20 St. Gaudens (Smithsonian), MS64 (estimated grade) - $1,000,000
1927-D $20 St. Gaudens (Smithsonian), MS64 (estimated grade) - $1,000,000

1933 $20, MS65 (estimated grade) - $2,500,000 to $3,500,000 (16 to 18 coins, perhaps more). There are approximately 16 to 18 known 1933 $20 Saint-Gaudens, including the ten specimens currently held by the government which are part of a legal battle to determine their legal status. There is one coin that grades an estimated MS65 that sold for $7.59 million at auction in 2002. This is the only example of this rarity that may be legally owned. In 2005, ten more specimens were turned in to the government and those ten coins are currently the subject of a lawsuit by the owners (the Switt family) seeking to have the coins returned to them with the declaration that they are legal to own. The Smithsonian Institution has two examples of the 1933 $20 in its collection and there are a rumored two or three other 1933 $20 gold pieces that may exist. It is our estimate that the 1933 $20 gold pieces that grade MS65, if they were legal to own, would bring $2.5 to $3.5 million each at auction. If the government wins its case and the ten coins it is holding are not legal to own, then the value of the one to four coins outside of government control would increase to well beyond the $3,500,000 price. PCGS Coin# 9195

1933 $20 St. Gaudens, MS65 (estimated grade) - $3,500,000
1933 $20 St. Gaudens (Smithsonian), MS65 (estimated grade) - $3,500,000
1933 $20 St. Gaudens (Smithsonian), MS64 (estimated grade) - $2,500,000
1933 $20 St. Gaudens (Switt family), MS64 (estimated grade) - $2,500,000
1933 $20 St. Gaudens (Switt family), MS64 (estimated grade) - $2,500,000
1933 $20 St. Gaudens (Switt family), MS64 (estimated grade) - $2,500,000
1933 $20 St. Gaudens (Switt family), MS64 (estimated grade) - $2,500,000
1933 $20 St. Gaudens (Switt family), MS64 (estimated grade) - $2,500,000
1933 $20 St. Gaudens (Switt family), MS64 (estimated grade) - $2,500,000
1933 $20 St. Gaudens (Switt family), MS64 (estimated grade) - $2,500,000
1933 $20 St. Gaudens (Switt family), MS64 (estimated grade) - $2,500,000
1933 $20 St. Gaudens (Switt family), MS64 (estimated grade) - $2,500,000
1933 $20 St. Gaudens (Switt family), MS64 (estimated grade) - $2,500,000
1933 $20 St. Gaudens (Ex-Texas bank collection), MS64 (estimated grade) - $2,500,000
1933 $20 St. Gaudens (rumored), MS64 (estimated grade) - $2,500,000
1933 $20 St. Gaudens (rumored), MS64 (estimated grade) - $2,500,000