audrop's Coin Album

(1296-1303) Pfg Leopold I AU55 PCGS #898942

Hildebrand von Seinsheim IV (1301-1384): Born Stephasberg, Kleinlangheim, Kitzingen, Unterfranken, Bavaria, Germany; married Dorothea von Wenckheim (1305-?) in 1328; died Hasberger, Landskrels, Bavaria, (Bayern), Germany.

1825-PTS JL 1/2 R Calico-442 MS65 PCGS #25938

Jane Bradshaw Flinn (1825-1899): born 16 September Antigonish, Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada; married Michael Olding Patterson (1814-1861) 13 April 1842 Merigomish, Pictou, Nova Scotia, Canada; died 5 January Milton, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States

1808-PTS PJ 8 R Calico-1014 CAROLUS IIII MS62 PCGS #143634

Jane Hare (1808-1891): born 21 December England; married Hammond Reason Riggs (`1806-1879) 22 October 1828 Belmont, Ohio; died 20 October Batavia, Jefferson, Iowa.

1777-PTS PR 4 R Calico-935 AU53 PCGS #721983

Thomas Butler (1777-1852): born 23 October Bucks, Pennsylvania, British Colonial America; married Hannah Michener Balderson (1782-1833) 1801 Bucks, Pennsylvania, United States of America; died Short Creek, Harrison, Ohio, USA.

1775-R 6400 R West Indies Imitation AU50 PCGS #515451

D. L. Flynn (1775-?: born Ireland; married Mary Kearney (1780-?). Elizabeth Worth (1775-1824): born 15 January Loudon, Merrimack, New Hampshire, British Colonial America; married Edward Knight (1768-1824) 17 February 1795 Loudon, Merrimack, New Hampshire, USA; died 1 October Starksboro, Addison, Vermont, USA. James Riggs (1778-1861): born 14 January Hagerstown, Washington, Maryland, British Colonial America; married Elizabeth Barnes (1775-1836) 9 February 1796 Anne Arundel, Maryland, United States; died Burnsville, Belmont, Ohio, USA.

1803-So FJ 8 Esc Calico-1773 AU53 PCGS #720507

Emily Rowe (1803-1874): Born 1 August in Addison, Addison, Vermont; married Lionel Worth Knight (1797-1851) 1 January 1824 at New Haven, Addison, Vermont; died 27 February at New Milford, Winnebago, Illinois. Mary Eliza Bradshaw (1803-1869): Born in and died, 17 March in Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada.

(1167-91) Denar Havernick-573 XF45 PCGS #891714

Bonifacio de Saluzzo (1180-1212): Born Saluzzo, Cuneo, Piemonte, Italy; married Maria Lacon-Gunale di Torres (1181-1264) 24 August 1202; died 22 July Saluzzo, Cuneo, Piemonte, Italy.

1808-P JF Escudo Calico-1523 AU58 PCGS #132151

Jane Hare (1808-1891): born 21 December England; married Hammond Reason Riggs (`1806-1879) 22 October 1828 Belmont, Ohio; died 20 October Batavia, Jefferson, Iowa.

1725-A 1/2 Ecu Gad-312 AU58+ PCGS #260547

Henry Holaday (1725-1800): born Chester, Pennsylvania, British Colonial America; married Mary Foyle (1723-1797) January 1746 Pennsylvania, British Colonial America; died 9 September Orange, North Carolina, USA.

1660-D 1/12 Ec Gad-115 Juvénile AU55 PCGS #268107

John Guy (1660-????): born London, London, England; married Susannah Hall (1660-????) 14 February 1688. Judith Maddiver (1660-1711): born Purpooduck, Cumberland, Maine, British Colonial America; married Samuel Lunt Ingersoll (1653-1732) 1679 Falmouth, Barnstable, Massachusetts Bay Colony, British Colonial America; died 1 May Gloucester, Essex, MBC, BCA. Samuel Woods Jr. (1660-1712): born 9 January Cambridge, Middlesex, MBC, BCA; married Hannah Farwell (1667-1739) 30 December 1685 Chelmsford, Middlesex, MBC, BCA: died 19 March Groton, Middlesex, MBC, BCA. Maria Carelszen (1660-1710): born 15 August New Amsterdam, New Netherland (17th century Dutch Colony in NA, (NY, NJ, De, Ct)); married Jacob's DeBevoise (1651-1710) 12 June 1678 NYC, NYC, NYC, BCA.

1784-R Ecu Gad-356 AU55 PCGS #359977

Elizabeth Birdsall (1784-1855): born 13 January Preston, Chenango, New York, USA; married Elisha Sanford Smith (1785-1866) 1807: died 13 May Alexander, Genesee, New York, USA.

1744-W L.D'Or Gad-341 MS63 PCGS #620100

Benjamen White, Sr. (1744-1808): born 5 October Little River MM, Perquimans, Carolina, British Colonial America.:

1738-A Sou M MS63 PCGS #158658

Rev James Shelburne (1738-1820): born 29 November Jamestown, James City, Colony of Virginia, British Colonial America; married Anne Pettus 22 September 1765 Lunenburg, Virginia, British Colonial America; died 6 March Lunenburg, Virginia, United States of America. William Charles (1738-1771): born 27 May Perquimans, North Carolina, British Colonial America; married Jane Albertson (1735-?) 10 April 1758 Perquimans, North Carolina, British Colonial America; died 5 January Wayne, North Carolina, British Colonial America.

1706 4D S-3595A AU58 PCGS #140263

Grace Tucker (17 July 1706-1746) Gloucester, Essex, Massachusetts Bay Colony. Steven Bennett (20 January 1706-after October 1754) Gloucester, Essex, Massachusetts Bay Colony. Elizabeth Heard (8 February 1706, Dover, Strafford, New Hampshire-at. 1765, Rochester, Strafford, New Hampshire). Married Robert Knight (1700-1768) in 1728 New Hampshire. Deborah Mack (11 October 1706-4 February 1776) Lyme, New London, Connecticut. Married Theophilus Lord (1698-1761) 8 May 1728. Margaret Farmer (2 September 1706, St. George's Parish, Baltimore, Maryland-before 30 August 1756, Baltimore, Maryland). Married Ford Barnes (1698-1749) on 17 September 1721 at St. Georges Parish.

1759 1D S-3715A MS63 PCGS #141737

Peter Probasco (1759-1803): born 25 November Somerset, Somerset, New Jersey, British Colonial America; married Mattye 8 September 1784 New Brunswick, Middlesex, New Jersey; died 20 July.

1711 6D S-3619 MS62 PCGS #162025

Sarah Hurd (1711=1770): born 24 August Harwich, Barnstable, Massachusetts Bay Colony, British Colonial America; married Seth Simon Covell (1705-1804) 22 November 1733 Harwich, Barnstable, Massachusetts Bay Colony, British Colonial America; died 22 November Harwich, Barnstable, Massachusetts Bay Colony, British Colonial America.

1707 1/2 Cr S-3604 Eng and Scot Shields AU53 PCGS #163210

Thomasin Porter (1707-?): born Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England; married Malcolm Gillies (1703-?) 20 July 1724 Middlesex, England. Mehitable Kimball (1707-1777): born 9 November Wenham, Essex, Massachusetts Bay Colony, British Colonial America; died 15 February Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts, USA. Eunice Willard (1707-1767): born Lancaster, Worcester, Massachusetts Bay Colony, British Colonial America; married Joseph Daby (1703-1767) 26 September 1724 Stow, Middlesex, Massachusetts Bay Colony, British Colonial America; died Lancaster, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA. Mary Wheeler (1707-1790): born 27 August Beverly, Massachusetts Bay Colony, British Colonial America; married Joseph Prentice (1704-1749) 10 November 1725 Griswold, New London, Connecticut Colony, British Colonial America; died 20 March Preston, New London, Connecticut, USA. Jane Langdon (1797-1795): born 2 April Nassau, Richmond, New York Colony, British Colonial America; married Nathan Birdsall, Sr. (1705-1784) 12 April 1726 Jamaica, Queens, New York Colony, British Colonial America; died Haviland, Hyde Park, Duchess, New York, USA.

(1017-23) 1D Cnut, S-1157 MS63 PCGS #163506

Kings of all England. Cnut (Canute) (1016-35) Penny c.1017-23 Cambridge mint, Adam as moneyer, S-1157, North-781, MS63 PCGS. + CNVT REX ANGLOR, crowned bust left within quatrefoil / + AD| AM | ON G | RAT, voided long cross with crescent ends over quatrefoil with pellet at each apex. An appealing piece, slightly double-struck, with mauve toning. Hugh de LacyLord of Lassey (6 October 1008-27 March 1085)

(1660-62) 3D S-3325 MS62 PCGS #165573

John Guy (1660-????): born London, London, England; married Susannah Hall (1660-????) 14 February 1688. Judith Maddiver (1660-1711): born Purpooduck, Cumberland, Maine, British Colonial America; married Samuel Lunt Ingersoll (1653-1732) 1679 Falmouth, Barnstable, Massachusetts Bay Colony, British Colonial America; died 1 May Gloucester, Essex, MBC, BCA. Samuel Woods Jr. (1660-1712): born 9 January Cambridge, Middlesex, MBC, BCA; married Hannah Farwell (1667-1739) 30 December 1685 Chelmsford, Middlesex, MBC, BCA: died 19 March Groton, Middlesex, MBC, BCA. Maria Carelszen (1660-1710): born 15 August New Amsterdam, New Netherland (17th century Dutch Colony in NA, (NY, NJ, De, Ct)); married Jacob's DeBevoise (1651-1710) 12 June 1678 NYC, NYC, NYC, BCA.

1750 6D S-3711 AU53 PCGS #169783

Catherine Puffer (1750-????): born 26 June Stow, Middlesex, Massachusetts Bay Colony, British Colonial America. John Cochrane (1750-1823): born Lancaster, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, British Colonial America; married Margaret Francis Scott (1753-1840) 20 August 1723 Lincoln Kentucky, United States; died 5 July Whites, Madison, Kentucky. William Hines (1750-1830); married Elizabeth Harris (17853-1830); died Pennsylvania, United States. William Holliday, Sr. (1750-1812): born 10 June New Holland Township, Chester, Pennsylvania, British Colonial America; married Jane Andrew (1755-1831) 2 August 1777 Cane Creek MM, North Carolina, British Colonial America; died 28 August Orange, North Carolina, United States.

1795 1D S-3761 MS62 PCGS #170593

Margaret Miller: born Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; married Joseph Paxon Jr. (1800-1838) 24 May 1810 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania;

1799 1/4D S-3779 MS63RB PCGS #200269

Patrick Flinn (1799-1875): born Ireland; married Mary Eliza Bradshaw (1803-1869) 28 February 1830 Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada; died 27 September Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada. William Lewis (1799-1870): born 13 January South Carolina, United States; married Anna Hollingsworth (1801-1853) 19 November 1818 Silver Creek MM, Union, Indiana, United States; died 10 August Illinois.

1797 1D S-3777 10 Leaves MS63BN PCGS #202229

Lionel Worth Knight (1797-1851): born 14 October Strafford, Strafford, New Hampshire, USA; married Emily Rowe (1803-1974) 1 January 1824 New Haven, Addison, Vermont, USA; died 9 June Starksboro, Addison, Vermont, USA.

1806 1D S-3780 MS63BN PCGS #202232

Hammond Reason Riggs (1806-1879): born 18 January Howard, Maryland, USA; married Jane Hare (1808-1891) 22 October 1828; died 7 December 1879 Batavia, Jefferson, Iowa, USA.

1797 2D S-3776 AU53BN PCGS #203284

Lionel Worth Knight (1797-1851): born 14 October Strafford, Strafford, New Hampshire, USA; married Emily Rowe (1803-1974) 1 January 1824 New Haven, Addison, Vermont, USA; died 9 June Starksboro, Addison, Vermont, USA.

1820 1D Mdy S-3796 PL64 PCGS #203392

John Jay Pittman wasn’t a man of great financial resources but amassed one of the finest collections of United States and world coinage ever assembled. He worked as a chemical engineer for Eastman Kodak Company but spent much of his time as an ambassador for the hobby of numismatics. Between 1997 and 1999 his collection was sold at a series of three public auctions for prices totaling more than $30 million.

1820 2D Mdy PL64 PCGS #203665

John Jay Pittman wasn’t a man of great financial resources but amassed one of the finest collections of United States and world coinage ever assembled. He worked as a chemical engineer for Eastman Kodak Company but spent much of his time as an ambassador for the hobby of numismatics. Between 1997 and 1999 his collection was sold at a series of three public auctions for prices totaling more than $30 million.

1820 3D Mdy PL65 PCGS #203931

John Jay Pittman wasn’t a man of great financial resources but amassed one of the finest collections of United States and world coinage ever assembled. He worked as a chemical engineer for Eastman Kodak Company but spent much of his time as an ambassador for the hobby of numismatics. Between 1997 and 1999 his collection was sold at a series of three public auctions for prices totaling more than $30 million.

1820 4D Mdy S-3793 PL64 PCGS #204198

John Jay Pittman wasn’t a man of great financial resources but amassed one of the finest collections of United States and world coinage ever assembled. He worked as a chemical engineer for Eastman Kodak Company but spent much of his time as an ambassador for the hobby of numismatics. Between 1997 and 1999 his collection was sold at a series of three public auctions for prices totaling more than $30 million.

1817 6D S-3791 MS64 PCGS #204769

John H. Cochrane (1817-1859) L4SJ-BMK: born Madison, Missouri, United States; married Letitia Kelley (1817-1885) 28 October 1828 Putnam, Missouri, United States; died 10 July Cottage Grove, Lane, Oregon, United States. Letitia Kelley (1817-1885) LHTV-FVC: born 25 April Tennessee, United States; married John H. Cochrane (1817-1859) 28 October 1828 Putnam, Missouri, United States; died 30 December Cottage Grove, Lane, Oregon, United States.

1816 Shil S-3790 MS66 PCGS #205145

Samuel Hymas (1816-1873) KHXS-QKS: born 7 July Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania,United States; married Anne Eliza Paxton (1821-1781) 25 May 1844 Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States; died 24 October Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States.

1811 18D S-3771 Esc-2112 MS63 PCGS #205637

Rebecca M. White (1811-1849): Born 10 January; married Jonathan Hadley (1813-1848) 22 July 1834 Lick Creek MM, Orange, Indiana, USA; died 15 January 1849 Vermillion Grove, Vermillion, USA.

1816 1/2 Cr S-3788 AU55 PCGS #205948

Samuel Hymas (1816-1873) KHXS-QKS: born 7 July Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania,United States; married Anne Eliza Paxton (1821-1781) 25 May 1844 Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States; died 24 October Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States.

1804 Bank $ Esc-1925 S-3768 MS65 PCGS #206345

Elizabeth Dishman (1804-1841): born Barren, Kentucky, USA; married Walker Pettus Redford (1805-1861) 5 November 1825 Glasgow, Barren, Kentucky, USA; died Barren, Kentucky, USA.

1729 4D S-3712 AU53 PCGS #222277

Priscilla Prentice (1729-1802): born 20 January Preston, New London, Connecticut Colony, British North America; married Peter Bundy (1720-1775) 14 July 1746 Preston, New London, Connecticut Colony, British North America; died 12 April 1802 Southampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts, United States of America. Martha Stone (1729-?) MKKY-N67 Hammutal Hammond (1729-?): born Maryland, British Colonial America. LBHF-X6K

1763 4D S-3750 AU58 PCGS #222326

Martha Patch (1763-1861): born 3 July Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts Bay Colony, British Colonial America; married Cape. Oliver Appleton (1760-1852) 12 March 1789; died 30 September Hamilton, Essex, Massachusetts.

1697 6D S-3538 3rd Bust Large Crowns MS63 PCGS #222377

John Casshatt (1697-1748): born 21 May Bristol, Gloucestershire, England; married Mary Eleanor Broyles (1718-1788) 1739 Rocky River, Chatham, North Carolina, British Colonial America; died 16 November Waterford, Fairfax, Virginia. John Williams (1697-1728): born 1 June Isle of Wight, Virginia, British Colonial America; married Sarah Pierce (1702-1760) 22 February 1725 Perquimans, North Carolina, British Colonial America; died 23 December Perquimans, North Carolina. Joseph Wells, Sr. (1679-1758): born 30 September Queen Anne Parish, Prince George's, Maryland, British Colonial America; married Rachel Lindley (1698-1720) 1719 Prince George's, Maryland; died 27 May North Carolina. John Hammond (1679-1753): born 15 October St. Anne's Parish, Annapolis, Anne Arundel, Maryland, British Colonial America; married Sarah AnnDorsey (1698-1786) 1722 Baltimore, Maryland; died 23 October Gambrills, Anne Arundel, Maryland.

1700 2D S-3551A AU58 PCGS #345580

William Olding (1700-????): born 18 October Winchester, Hampton, England; married Marie Ann Purdue (1702-????) 14 November 1725 St. Lawrence, England. James Caller (1700?-1765?): born Westsester, Westchester, New York Colony, British Colonial America; married Maritime De Gree (1702-1765) 15 February 1722 Collegiate Church, New York City, British Colonial America; died Manor of Morrisania, Westchester, New York Colony, British Colonial America. Nathaniel Averill, Jr. (1700-1781): born 6 September Topsfield, Essex, Massachusetts bay Colony, British Colonial America; married Hannah Wildes (1709-1785) 24 November 1743 Topsfield, Essex, Massachusetts Bay Colony, British Colonial America; died 17 August Topsfield, Massachusetts, United States. Robert Knight (1700-1768): married Elizabeth Heard (1706-1765) 1728 New Hampshire, Amerique Coloniale Britainnique; died New Hampshire, Amerique Coloniale, Britainnique. Mary Cocke (1700-1754): born; married John Redford, Jr. 1723; and died Henrico, Virginia, British Colonial America. Thomas Salmon (1700-????): born Goochland, Goochland, Virginia, British Colonial America. Symon van Wicklen (1700-1755): born Flatbush, Kings, Colony of New York, British Colonial America; married Geraldina van Couvenhoven (1705-1754) 25 November 1722 Somerset, New York; died Somerset, Colony of New Jersey, British Colonial America. Mary Kuster (1700-1758): born 1 march Plumstead Township, Bucks, Pennsylvania, British Colonial America; married William Michener (1696-1780) 17 June 1720 Pennsylvania, British Colonial America; died 24 April.

1710 2D S-3597A AU53 PCGS #348634

Thomas Samson, Jr. (1710-1751): born 4 October; married Mary Adams (1714-1751) 11 August 1732; died 31 August all in Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts Bay Colony, British Colonial America. Jonathan Brown (1710-?: born Lynn, Massachusetts Bay Colony, British Colonial America, married Hannah Davis (1713-1817) 3 December 1731 Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts Bay Colony, British Colonial America. Mary Hooke (1710-1788): born 15 January; married Stephen Bennett (1706-1790) 2 January 1728 both in Salisbury, Essex, Massachusetts Bay Colony, British Colonial America; died 10 June Gloucester, Essex, Massachusetts, USA. William Stone III (1710-1777): born 5 October St. Peters Parish, New Kent, Virginia, British Colonial America; married Francis Taylor (1717-1792); 5 September Fluvanna County, Virginia, USA. Samuel Cochrane (1710-1772): born Lancaster, Pennsylvania, British Colonial America; married Sarah Woods (1712-1776) 1739 Ireland; died 9 October Rowan, North Carolina, British Colonial America. Ann Alan Simpson (1710-1790): born Scotland; married Mathew Hines (1713-1804) 1742 Whitemarsh Township, Montgomery, Pennsylvania, British Colonial America; died 1 December Warwick Township, Bucks, Pennsylvania, USA. Richard Holyfield Henderson (1710-1789): born Hanover County, Virginia, British Colonial America; married Elizabeth Branson (1732-1761); died 26 April Bush River, Edgefield County, South Carolina, USA. Richard Mitchell (1710-1748): born 26 August Harford, Maryland, British Colonial America; married Elizabeth Williams (1711-1774) 1 January 1733 St. George Parish, Baltimore, Maryland, British Colonial America; died 12 August Baltimore, Maryland, British Colonial America.

1756 2D S-3714A MS63 PCGS #348780

Gilbert Smith (1756-1795): born 7 January in Stonington, New London, Connecticut Colony, British Colonial America; married Delilah Bundy (1758-1846) on 3 January 1783 in Rochester, Monroe, New York, United States; died Salem. Washington, New York. Elizabeth Bolton (1756-1821): born Boltby, Yorkshire, England; married James Scurr (1745-1820) 16 January 1782 York, Yorkshire, England; died in May Boltby, Yorkshire, England.

1698 3D S-3550 MS62 PCGS #348851

Deborah Peavey (1698-1756): born Newington, Rockingham, New Hampshire, British Colonial America; married James Rawlins (1679-1743) 9 April 1717 Newington, Rockingham, New Hampshire, British Colonial America; died 23 November. Hannah Tuttle (1698-1776): born May Milford, New Haven, Connecticut Colony, British Colonial America; married John Rowe (1681-1757) 17 June 1736 New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut; died 12 November East Haven, New Haven, Connecticut. Theophius Lord (1698-1761): born 19 December Lyme, New London, Connecticut Colony, British Colonial America; married Deborah Mack 8 May 1728 Lyme, New London, Connecticut Colony, British Colonial America; died 28 February Hamburg, New London, Connecticut Colony, British Colonial America. Mary Jones (1698-1743): born 6 October New Haven, Connecticut, British Colonial America; married Samuel Elwell III (1696-1783) 12 October 1721; died New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut Colony, British Colonial America. Major John Salmon II (1698-1762) LCJ2-H28. Augustine Shelburne (1698-1764) MPW4-11Q. Edward Glew Scott (1698-1791) LZFC-RS9. Rachel Lindley (1698-1720)* L4SN-PJS.

1717 3D S-3655 AU58 PCGS #348888

Susanna Stevens (1717-1753): born 25 march Pembroke, Plymouth, Massachusetts Bay, British Colonial America; married David Pearce, Sr. (1713-1759) 20 January 1736 Gloucester, Essex, Massachusetts; died Gloucester. Comfort Haskell (1717-1809): born 22 May Gloucester, Essex, Massachusetts, British Colonial America; married Parker Sawyer (1719-1750) 10 November 1742; died 5 September. Lucy Fellows Stevens (1717-1806): 2 June Stonington, New London, Connecticut Colony, British Colonial America; married Ephraim Smith (1704-1774) 3 January 1744 Stonington; died 4 May Montgomery, Pennsylvania, United States. Francis Taylor (1717-1792): born 26 January St. Peer's Parish, New Kent County, Province of Virginia, British Colonial America; married William Stone III (1710-1777); died 5 June Fluvanna County, Virginia, United States. Amy Anne Walker (1717-1778): born 25 February New Kent, Virginia, British Colonial America; married Colonel Thomas Pettus (1712-1780) 10 November 1735 Hanover, Virginia; died 22 October Cumberland Parish, Lunenburg, Virginia. John Edmundson (1717-1780): born Craven North Carolina, British Colonial America; married Mary Cullen (1825-1822); died Dobbs, North Carolina, United States. Hannah McKay (1717-1754): born 1 July Augusta Parish, Augusta, Virginia, British Colonial America; married George Hollingsworth (1712-1786) 19 December 1734 Chester, Pennsylvania; died 9 March Winchester, Frederick, Virginia,

1649 Shil S-3217 Commonwealth MS61 PCGS #379250

Ex. S. Birchall of Leeds Graded MS63 by NGC #5953815-001

1686 4D S-3414 MS61 PCGS #381053

Abraham Hollingsworth (1686-1748): born 18 January Rockland, New Castle, Delaware, British Colonial America; married Ann Robinson (1690-1749) 13 march 1709 Frederick, Virginia, British Colonial America; died 1 October Winchester, Frederick, Virginia, British Colonial America. Richard heaven Sr. (1686-1738): born 7 January Calvert, Maryland, British Colonial America; married Mary Jane Blanford 1705 Prince George's, Maryland, British Colonial America; died 28 February Prince George's, Maryland, British Colonial America. Anna Maria Van Leeuwan (1686-1752): born 26 April Jamaica, Queens, New York Colony, British Colonial America; married Jakob Probasco (1682-1755); died 22 December Somerset, Somerset, New Jersey, British Colonial America. Elsje Janse Staats (1686-1762): born 7 February Gowanus, Kings, New York Colony, British Colonial America; married Nicasius Jansen van Kouwenhoven (1681-1749) 3 November 1703 Brooklyn, Kings, New York Colony, British Colonial America; died Brooklyn, Kings, New York Colony, British Colonial America.

1718 1D S-3657 AU55 PCGS #419056

Edward Rawlins (1718-1756): born 2 March Newington, Rockingham, New Hampshire, British Colonial America; married Elizabeth Knight Nutter 21 November 1742 Newington; died 25 May Dover, Straford, New Hampshire. Peter Dishman (1718-1772): born Westmoreland, Virginia, British Colonial America; married Sarah Reynolds (1723-1808) 1745 Virginia; died Tappahannock, Essex, Virginia. Mary Eleanor Broyles (1718-1788): born Virginia, British Colonial America; married John Cassatt (1697-1748) 1739 Rocky River, Chatham North Carolina; died North carolina, United States.

(1643-44) Shil S-2800 (P) AU58 PCGS #419474

Mary Ann Steavenson (1643-1719): born and died Raphoe, Donegal, Ireland. William Ellery, Jr (1643-1696): born Bristol, England; married Mary Coit (1655-1730) 13 June 1676 Lewiston, Androscoggin, Maine, British Colonial America; died 9 December Gloucester, Essex, Massachusetts Bay Colony, BCA. John Hogg (1643-1728): born 4 March Boston, Suffolk, MBC, BCA; married Ebenezer Emery (1648-1694) 21 April 1669 Newbury, Essex, MBC, BCA; died 21 April Newbury, Essex, MBC, BCA. Andrew Sanford, Jr. (1643-1705): born 11 November Hartford, Hartford, Colony of Connecticut, BCA; married Mary Botsford (!643-1687) 8 January 1667 Milford, New Haven, CoC, BCA; died August Milford, New Haven, CoC, BCA. Mary Botsford (1643-1687): born 21 May Milford, New Haven, CoC, BCA; married (see above); died January Hartford, CoC, BCA. Sarah Woodward (1643-1706): born 3 February Watertown, MBC, BCA; married Steven Gates (1640-1707) about 1664 Middlesex, MBC, BCA; died 21 October Stow, Middlesex, MBC, BCA. Hannah Denison (1643-1715): born 20 May Roxbury, MBC, BCA; married Nathanial Chesebrough March 1659; died 18 October Stonington, New London, CoC, BCA. Mercy Williams (1643-1739): born Eastham, Barnstable, MBC, BCA; married William Nickerson, Jr. 30 November 1668 Chatham, Barnstable, MBC, BCA; died 7 April Chatham, Barnstable, MBC, BCA. Mary Ann Hussey (1643-1714): born Charles, Maryland, BCA; married John Hanson (1630-1713) Charles, Maryland, BCA; died 7 May Port Tobacco, Charles, Maryland, BCA. Jeremiah Ellis, Sr. (1643-1723): born James City, Virginia, BCA; married Mary (1648-1722) VA, BCA; died Surry, VA, BCA.

1700 Shil S-3516 MS63 PCGS #520886

William Olding (1700-????): born 18 October Winchester, Hampton, England; married Marie Ann Purdue (1702-????) 14 November 1725 St. Lawrence, England. James Caller (1700?-1765?): born Westsester, Westchester, New York Colony, British Colonial America; married Maritime De Gree (1702-1765) 15 February 1722 Collegiate Church, New York City, British Colonial America; died Manor of Morrisania, Westchester, New York Colony, British Colonial America. Nathaniel Averill, Jr. (1700-1781): born 6 September Topsfield, Essex, Massachusetts bay Colony, British Colonial America; married Hannah Wildes (1709-1785) 24 November 1743 Topsfield, Essex, Massachusetts Bay Colony, British Colonial America; died 17 August Topsfield, Massachusetts, United States. Robert Knight (1700-1768): married Elizabeth Heard (1706-1765) 1728 New Hampshire, Amerique Coloniale Britainnique; died New Hampshire, Amerique Coloniale, Britainnique. Mary Cocke (1700-1754): born; married John Redford, Jr. 1723; and died Henrico, Virginia, British Colonial America. Thomas Salmon (1700-????): born Goochland, Goochland, Virginia, British Colonial America. Symon van Wicklen (1700-1755): born Flatbush, Kings, Colony of New York, British Colonial America; married Geraldina van Couvenhoven (1705-1754) 25 November 1722 Somerset, New York; died Somerset, Colony of New Jersey, British Colonial America. Mary Kuster (1700-1758): born 1 march Plumstead Township, Bucks, Pennsylvania, British Colonial America; married William Michener (1696-1780) 17 June 1720 Pennsylvania, British Colonial America; died 24 April.

1793 Tk 1/2D DH-13a Staffordshire, Leek MS62BN PCGS #523115

Samuel Symonds (1793-1852): born 17 October Hillsborough, Hillsborough, New Hampshire; married Mary Eliza Bradshaw (!803-1869); died July. Pearcy Edmundson (1793-1854): born 4 March Wayne, North Carolina; married William E. Morris (1791-1850) 1812 Vermillion, Indiana; died 11 October Coloma, Park, Indiana.

1795 Tk 1/2D DH-40 Somersetshire, Bath MS64BN PCGS #524549

Margaret Miller: born Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; married Joseph Paxon Jr. (1800-1838) 24 May 1810 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania;

1795 Tk 1/4D DH-10 Dorsetshire, Poole MS65BN PCGS #543131

Margaret Miller: born Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; married Joseph Paxon Jr. (1800-1838) 24 May 1810 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania;

1795 Tk 1/2D DH-4 Hertfordshire, Stortford N1BN PCGS #571953

Margaret Miller (1795-?): Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States; married Joseph Paxon, Jr. 24 May 1810 Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.

(c.1790) Tk 1/2D DH-5a Westmoreland, Kendal MS63BN PCGS #573138

Kelley (1792-?): born Tennessee.

1797 Tk 1/2D DH-4 Cheshire, Beeston N1BN PCGS #573918

Lionel Worth Knight (1797-1851): born 14 October Stratford, Stratford, New Hampshire; married Emily Rowe (1803-1874) 1 January 1824 New Haven, Addison, Vermont; died 9 June Starksboro, Addison, Vermont.

1795 Tk 1/2D DH-37 Suffolk, Lowestoft MS64BN PCGS #574372

Margaret Miller: born Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; married Joseph Paxon Jr. (1800-1838) 24 May 1810 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania;

1795 Tk 1/2D DH-63d Yorkshire, York MS64BN PCGS #576837

Margaret Miller: born Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; married Joseph Paxon Jr. (1800-1838) 24 May 1810 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania;

1796 Tk 1/2D DH-54 Norfolk, Yarmouth MS64RB PCGS #580325

Captain-Blacksmith, George Appleton (1796-1862); born 29 July Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts; married Martha Patch (1763-1861) 12 March 1789 Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts; died 21 November Hamilton, Essex, Massachusetts. Letitia: born 1796(?) Virginia.

1796 Tk 1/2D DH-33 Gloucestershire Badminton MS64RB PCGS #582199

Captain-Blacksmith, George Appleton (1796-1862); born 29 July Ipswich, Essex. Massachusetts; married Mehitable Lovering (1801-1862) 29 May 1821 Hamilton, Essex, Massachusetts; died 21 November Hamilton, Essex, Massachusetts. Letitia: born in Virginia.

1801 1/2 G S-3736 MS63 PCGS #610035

Mehitable Lovering (1801-1862): born 14 May Hamilton, Essex, Massachusetts, USA; married Captain-Blacksmith, George Appleton (1796-1862) 29 May 1821 Hamilton, Essex, Massachusetts, USA; died 4 February Hamilton, Essex, Massachusetts, USA. Anna Hollingsworth (1801-1853): born 15 November South Carolina, USA; married William Lewis (1799-1870) 19 November 1818 Silver Creek MM, Union, Indiana, USA; died Illinois, USA.

1698 1/2 Cr S-3494 DECIMO MS63 PCGS #610062

Deborah Peavey (1698-1756): born Newington, Rockingham, New Hampshire, British Colonial America; married James Rawlins (1679-1743) 9 April 1717 Newington, Rockingham, New Hampshire, British Colonial America; died 23 November. Hannah Tuttle (1698-1776): born May Milford, New Haven, Connecticut Colony, British Colonial America; married John Rowe (1681-1757) 17 June 1736 New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut; died 12 November East Haven, New Haven, Connecticut. Theophius Lord (1698-1761): born 19 December Lyme, New London, Connecticut Colony, British Colonial America; married Deborah Mack 8 May 1728 Lyme, New London, Connecticut Colony, British Colonial America; died 28 February Hamburg, New London, Connecticut Colony, British Colonial America. Mary Jones (1698-1743): born 6 October New Haven, Connecticut, British Colonial America; married Samuel Elwell III (1696-1783) 12 October 1721; died New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut Colony, British Colonial America. Major John Salmon II (1698-1762) LCJ2-H28. Augustine Shelburne (1698-1764) MPW4-11Q. Edward Glew Scott (1698-1791) LZFC-RS9. Rachel Lindley (1698-1720)* L4SN-PJS.

1746 1/2 Cr S-3695A LIMA MS62 PCGS #610063

John Lovering III (1746-1832): born Topsfield, Essex, Massachusetts, British Colonial America; married Hannah Averill 23 January 1773 Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts, British Colonial America; died Hamilton, Essex, Massachusetts, United States. Job Knights (1746-1786): born 10 September Gloucester, Essex, Massachusetts, British Colonial America; married Abigail Bennett (1747-1803) 12 August 1767; died lost at sea.

1754 1/4D S-3722 MS63BN PCGS #610091

William Samuel Dishman (1754-1833): born 26 September Essex, Virginia, British Colonial America; married Sarah Salmon (1764-1839) 2 February 1784 Bedford, Virginia, United States; died 4 December Barren, Kentucky, United States.

(1660-62) 2D S-3316 2nd Issue AU55 PCGS #610162

John Guy (1660-????): born London, London, England; married Susannah Hall (1660-????) 14 February 1688. Judith Maddiver (1660-1711): born Purpooduck, Cumberland, Maine, British Colonial America; married Samuel Lunt Ingersoll (1653-1732) 1679 Falmouth, Barnstable, Massachusetts Bay Colony, British Colonial America; died 1 May Gloucester, Essex, MBC, BCA. Samuel Woods Jr. (1660-1712): born 9 January Cambridge, Middlesex, MBC, BCA; married Hannah Farwell (1667-1739) 30 December 1685 Chelmsford, Middlesex, MBC, BCA: died 19 March Groton, Middlesex, MBC, BCA. Maria Carelszen (1660-1710): born 15 August New Amsterdam, New Netherland (17th century Dutch Colony in NA, (NY, NJ, De, Ct)); married Jacob's DeBevoise (1651-1710) 12 June 1678 NYC, NYC, NYC, BCA.

1752 1/2D S-3719 MS64BN PCGS #610367

Truman Bevins (1752-????): born Howard County, Maryland, British Colonial America; married Margaret McFall (1753-1780) in 1774 Baltimore, Maryland, British Colonial America.

1749 1/2D S-3719 MS63RB PCGS #610380

$2,275 delivered.

1799 1/2D S-3778 MS64RB PCGS #610401

Patrick Flinn (1799-1875): born Ireland; married Mary Eliza Bradshaw (1803-1869) 28 February 1830 Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada; died 27 September Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada. William Lewis (1799-1870): born 13 January South Carolina, United States; married Anna Hollingsworth (1801-1853) 19 November 1818 Silver Creek MM, Union, Indiana, United States; died 10 August Illinois.

1763 2D S-3756 MS62 PCGS #612478

Martha Patch (1763-1861): born 3 July Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts Bay Colony, British Colonial America; married Cape. Oliver Appleton (1760-1852) 12 March 1789; died 30 September Hamilton, Essex, Massachusetts.

1740 3D S-3713B AU53 PCGS #612554

Caleb White (1740-1795): born 8 March Perquimans MM, Perquimans, North Carolina, British Colonial America; married Rachel Jordan (1703-1768) 4 February 1761 Perquimans, North Carolina, British Colonial America; died 26 February Perquimans, North Carolina, United States of America.

1763 3D S-3753 AU58 PCGS #612653

Martha Patch (1763-1861): born 3 July Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts Bay Colony, British Colonial America; married Cape. Oliver Appleton (1760-1852) 12 March 1789; died 30 September Hamilton, Essex, Massachusetts.

1787 6D S-3748 No Hearts MS65 PCGS #615024

Sitie Probasco (1787-1868) MW1P-4NV: born 2 August New Brunswick, Middlesex, New Jersey; married William Woolley (1768-????).

1693 Shil S-3437 VF25 PCGS #616012

John Parsons (1693-?) MFG5-K12 John Goss (1693-1746) LBM7-R7Q Sarah 'Sally' Spencer (1693-1743) LZ8F-W6V Susanna (1693-?) KN4P-CYJ John Boulton (1693-?) MJ1Q-2TW

1707 Shil S-3610 3rd Bust MS64 PCGS #616019

Thomasin Porter (1707-?): born Tunbridge Wells, Kent, England; married Malcolm Gillies (1703-?) 20 July 1724 Middlesex, England. Mehitable Kimball (1707-1777): born 9 November Wenham, Essex, Massachusetts Bay Colony, British Colonial America; died 15 February Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts, USA. Eunice Willard (1707-1767): born Lancaster, Worcester, Massachusetts Bay Colony, British Colonial America; married Joseph Daby (1703-1767) 26 September 1724 Stow, Middlesex, Massachusetts Bay Colony, British Colonial America; died Lancaster, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA. Mary Wheeler (1707-1790): born 27 August Beverly, Massachusetts Bay Colony, British Colonial America; married Joseph Prentice (1704-1749) 10 November 1725 Griswold, New London, Connecticut Colony, British Colonial America; died 20 March Preston, New London, Connecticut, USA. Jane Langdon (1797-1795): born 2 April Nassau, Richmond, New York Colony, British Colonial America; married Nathan Birdsall, Sr. (1705-1784) 12 April 1726 Jamaica, Queens, New York Colony, British Colonial America; died Haviland, Hyde Park, Duchess, New York, USA.

1723 Shil S-3647 First Bust S.S.C. Rev MS65 PCGS #616060

1076996 | GREAT BRITAIN. England. William III. (King, 1694-1702). 1698 AR Halfcrown. PCGS MS63. By Roettier. Tower mint (London). Edge: DECUS ET TUTAMEN ANNO REGNI DECIMO. GVLIELMVS· III·DEI·GRA . First laureate and draped bust, right; legend around / MAG BR·FRA ET·HIB REX·16 98·. Crowned cruciform shields around central Nassau lion, divided date above; legend around. KM 492.2; SCBC-3494; ESC 554.

1758 Shil S-3704 AU53 PCGS #616071

Delilah Bundy (1758-1846); born 7 September Preston, New London, Connecticut, British Colonial America; married Stephen Andrus (1754-?) 1779 Preston, New London, Connecticut, United States, Gilbert Smith (1756-1795) 3 January 1783 Rochester, Monroe, New York, USA; died 24 March Le Roy, Genesee, New York, USA.

1787 Shil S-3743 Without Hearts MS63 PCGS #616800

Sitie Probasco (1787-1868) MW1P-4NV: born 2 August New Brunswick, Middlesex, New Jersey; married William Woolley (1768-????).

1689 1/2 Cr S-3434 First Shield AU53 PCGS #616822

Mary Johnson (1689-1766): Born Westerly, Kings, Rhode Island, British Colonial America; married James Bundy, Jr. (1688-1762) 1710 Preston, New London, Connecticut Colony, British Colonial America; died after 4 May Preston, New London, Connecticut Colony, British Colonial America. William DePriest (1689-1737): Born October St. Peters Parish, New Kent, Virginia Colony, British Colonial America; married Judith (1708-1796) 1725 Goochland, Virginia Colony, British Colonial America; died 2 March Goochland, Virginia Colony, British Colonial America. Mary Royale (1689-1749): Born 24 October Scotland, Chester, Pennsylvania, British Colonial America; married Jeremiah Brown (1687-1767) 1710; died 31 July Rising Sun, Cecil, Maryland, British Colonial America. Mary Wheeler (1689-1761): Born Baltimore, Maryland, British Colonial America; married Major Thomas Williams (1685-1733) 6 December 1706 Baltimore, Maryland, British Colonial America; died Baltimore, Maryland, British Colonial America.

1777 Guinea S-3728 AU55 PCGS #618053

Thomas Butler (1777-1852): born 23 October Bucks, Pennsylvania, British Colonial America; married Hannah Michener Balderson (1782-1833) 1801 Bucks, Pennsylvania, United States of America; died Short Creek, Harrison, Ohio, United States of America.

1797 Tk 1/2D DH-284 Warwickshire Kempson's MS64BN PCGS #641258

Lionel Worth Knight (1797-1851): born 14 October Stratford, Stratford, New Hampshire; married Emily Rowe (1803-1874) 1 January 1824 New Haven, Addison, Vermont; died 9 June Starksboro, Addison, Vermont.

1796 Tk 1/2D DH-7 Buckinghamshire Aylesbury AU55BN PCGS #649557

Captain-Blacksmith, George Appleton (1896-1862); born 29 July Ipswich, Essex. Massachusetts; married Mehitable Lovering (1801-1862) 29 May 1821 Hamilton, Essex, Massachusetts; died 21 November Hamilton, Essex, Massachusetts. Letitia: born in Virginia.

1793 Tk 1/4D DH-15a North Wales MS65BN PCGS #674449

Samuel Symonds (1793-1852): born 17 October Hillsborough, Hillsborough, New Hampshire; married Mary Eliza Bradshaw (!803-1869); died July. Pearcy Edmundson (1793-1854): born 4 March Wayne, North Carolina; married William E. Morris (1791-1850) 1812 Vermillion, Indiana; died 11 October Coloma, Park, Indiana.

1686 2D S-3416 IΛCOBVS MS62 PCGS #683238

Abraham Hollingsworth (1686-1748): born 18 January Rockland, New Castle, Delaware, British Colonial America; married Ann Robinson (1690-1749) 13 march 1709 Frederick, Virginia, British Colonial America; died 1 October Winchester, Frederick, Virginia, British Colonial America. Richard heaven Sr. (1686-1738): born 7 January Calvert, Maryland, British Colonial America; married Mary Jane Blanford 1705 Prince George's, Maryland, British Colonial America; died 28 February Prince George's, Maryland, British Colonial America. Anna Maria Van Leeuwan (1686-1752): born 26 April Jamaica, Queens, New York Colony, British Colonial America; married Jakob Probasco (1682-1755); died 22 December Somerset, Somerset, New Jersey, British Colonial America. Elsje Janse Staats (1686-1762): born 7 February Gowanus, Kings, New York Colony, British Colonial America; married Nicasius Jansen van Kouwenhoven (1681-1749) 3 November 1703 Brooklyn, Kings, New York Colony, British Colonial America; died Brooklyn, Kings, New York Colony, British Colonial America.

1686 1D S-3417 MS62 PCGS #767910

Abraham Hollingsworth (1686-1748): born 18 January Rockland, New Castle, Delaware, British Colonial America; married Ann Robinson (1690-1749) 13 march 1709 Frederick, Virginia, British Colonial America; died 1 October Winchester, Frederick, Virginia, British Colonial America. Richard heaven Sr. (1686-1738): born 7 January Calvert, Maryland, British Colonial America; married Mary Jane Blanford 1705 Prince George's, Maryland, British Colonial America; died 28 February Prince George's, Maryland, British Colonial America. Anna Maria Van Leeuwan (1686-1752): born 26 April Jamaica, Queens, New York Colony, British Colonial America; married Jakob Probasco (1682-1755); died 22 December Somerset, Somerset, New Jersey, British Colonial America. Elsje Janse Staats (1686-1762): born 7 February Gowanus, Kings, New York Colony, British Colonial America; married Nicasius Jansen van Kouwenhoven (1681-1749) 3 November 1703 Brooklyn, Kings, New York Colony, British Colonial America; died Brooklyn, Kings, New York Colony, British Colonial America.

(1631-32) 2D Briot S-2856 AU55 PCGS #767957

Joseph Safford ,Sr. (1631-1701): Born 29 August Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts Bay Colony, British Colonial America; married Mary Baker (1637-1683) 4 March 1660 Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts Bay Colony, British Colonial America; died 29 August Ipswich, Essex, MBC, BCA. Abigail Clark (1632-1710): Born Gloucester, Essex, Massachusetts Bay Colony, British Colonial America; married William Sargent (1624-1716) 10 September 1651 Ipswich, Essex, MBC, BCA; died 8 March Gloucester, Essex, MBC, BCA. Sarah Shattuck (1631-1724): Born 4 April Salem, Essex, MBC, BCA; married Richard Gardner (1621-1688) abt. 1652 Salem, Essex, MBC, BCA; died 4 April Nantucket, Nantucket, MBC, BCA. John Tuttle (1631-1683): Born 8 December Ringstead, Northamptonshire, England; married Katherine Lane (1631-1669) 8 November 1653 Newhaven Towne, New Haven, Connecticut; died 12 November New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut, BCA. Sarah Felton (1631-1679): Born Stow, Middlesex, BCA; married John Darby (1633-1669) 1655 Concord Township, Somerset, MBC, BCA; died Massachusetts, BCA. Hannah Eaton (1632-1707): Born 17 October London, Middlesex, England; married William Jones (1623-1706) July 1659 London, Middlesex, England; died 4 May New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut Colony, BCA. Ann Lawrence (1632-1695): Born England; married Francis Redford (1615-1693) October 1656 Charles City County, Virginia, BCA; died 2 September Henrico, Virginia, BCA. Margaret Smyth (1631-1681): Born 30 January Falkirk, Stirlingshire, Scotland; married Sir John Buchanan 1st Laird of Blairlusk (1620-1682) 1657 Scotland; died Buchanan, Stirlingshire. Scotland. Mary Parker (1632-1699): Born London, England; married John Hall (1628-1660) 1653 Maryland, BCA; died 24 December Anne Arundel, Maryland, BCA. Dirck Janse Woertman (1631-1694): Born 7 December Amsterdam, North Holland, Netherlands; married Marritje Teunis Nyssen 7 March 1660 Brooklyn, Kings, New York Colony, BCA; died 10 April Brooklyn, Kings, NYC, BCA. James Brathwaite (1632-1665): Born 6 June Hawkshead, Lancashire, England; married Margaret (1630-1691); died Cumbria, England. Henry White (1631-1671): Born York, Virginia, BCA; married Mary Croshaw (1631-1679) 1653 York, Virginia, BCA; died 6 January York, Virginia, BCA. Mary Croshaw (1631-1679): Born Jamestown, James City, Virginia, BCA; married (see above); died 3 March Pasquotank, Pasquotank, North Carolina, BCA. Elizabeth Prieste (1631-1668): Born 1 January Kingston, Surrey, England; married Henry Wilcock (1634-1684) 13 November 1638 St. Mary Aldermary; died Colony of Maryland, BCA. Valentine Hollingsworth (1632-1710): Born 6 August Ballyvickcrannell, Seagoe, County Armagh, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom; married Ann Lee (1628-1671) 7 June 1655 Lurgan, County Armagh, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom; died 13 October Newark, New Castle, Delaware, BCA.

1679 2D S-3388 AU58 PCGS #768006

William Callore (Callar), born in New York around 1679; married Susan Chetty (1681) in Westchester County, New York and died in Westchester, New York. Sarah Fitch: born 1679, married Zechariah Whitman Jr. 6 Jan 1702, both in Milford, Connecticut; and died 27 Nov 1705 at Norwalk, CT. Mary Mansfield: born 1679 in Jamestown, Virginia, married Augustine Shelborne in 1896 at Henrico, Virginia. Margaret Stephenson: born 1679 in County Londonderry, Ireland; married Andrew Cochrane (1675-) abt. 1721 at Carikeel, Londonderry, Ulster, Ireland. Jeanne Hermant: born 1679; married Andre Cochet (1675-1728); died 1737. Johannes Broyles: born 1 May 1879 at Kumbach, Landkreis Karlsruhe, Baden-Wurttemberg, Germany; married Ursula Ruop (1680-1733) 6 November 1703 at Otishelm, Germany. Robert Mackay Sr.: Born 1679 at Dornoch, Sutherland, Scotland; married Anne Browne (1687-1726); died 19 August 1752. Charles II: Born at St. James Palace on 29th May 1630. He spent a long exile in France and returned after the fall of the Protectorate in 1660. The Restoration commenced and he married Catherine of Braganza, but he bore no legitimate successor. Charles II died on 6th February 1685.

1791 Tk 1/2D DH-2 Cornwall, County Bronzed PR64 PCGS #808151

William E. Morris (1791-1850): born 24 May in Wayne, North Carolina, British Colonial America; married Pearcy Edmundson (1793-1854) in 1812 Vermillion, Indiana; died 7 April at Rocky Run, Parke, Indiana.

(1635-36) 6D S-2813 Crown AU50 PCGS #862005

William Olding (1635-1723): born Kent, England; married Anne Kervill (1646-?) 15 October 1665 Eling, Hampshire, England, United Kingdom.

(1640-41) 1/2 Cr S-2779 Star AU50 PCGS #882392

William Haynes (1640-1702): Born Chedworth, Gloucestershire, England; married Margery White (1640-deceased) abt. 1663 Lewiston, Androscoggin, Maine; died Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts Bay Colony, British Colonial America. William Worth (1640-1724): Born Plymouth, Devon, England; married Sarah Macy (1646-1701) 11 April 1665 Nantucket, Nantucket, Massachusetts Bay Colony, British Colonial America and later Damaris Sibley (1666-1745); died 11 November in Nantucket. Thomas Howell (1640-?): Born England, married Mary English (1655-1732). Robert Cartwright (1641-1676): Born Droitwich, Worcestershire, England; married Elizabeth Orchard (1643-1676) in 1664 Surry, Surry, Virginia; died Southwark Parish, James City, Virginia, British Colonial America.

1811 Tk Shil Dalton-5 Northamptonshire Peterborough MS64 PCGS #891690

Rebecca M. White (1811-1849): born 10 January; married Jonathan Hadley (1813-1848) 22 July 1834 Lick Creek MM, Orange, Indiana; died 15 January Vermillion Grove, Vermillion, Illinois.

(1248-50) 1D S-1363 MS63 PCGS #895713

Petronella Bettesley (1248-?); married Sir Thomas Crane (1255-?) 1273 Suffolk, England. Sofie Christine Nilsdotter Tokesen (1250-1293); married Peder Lauridsen Saltensee (1255-1333); died Tystofte, Tjaereby, Vester Flakkebjerg, Soro, Denberg. Esge Olufsen Blis (1250-1290). John Grounde (1250-?); born Amersham, Raans, Buckingham, England. Margery Elleforde (1250-1290); married Peter Arderne (1241-1292) 1271 Aldford, Cheshire, England. William Madog (1250-?)

(1066-87) 1D S-1251 MS62 PCGS #895857

GilleBride MacGille Adomnan (1080-1164): Born Morven, Argyll, Scotland; married Agatha Gormflarth Haakensdottir (1090-?) Orkney Islands, Orkney, Scotland; died Renfrew, Renfrewshire, Scotland. Olafr Guoredarson, King of Man (1080-1153): Born Isle of Man; married Ingeborg Ingibjorg Haakensdottir (?-1152) before 1135 Isle of Man; died 29 June Ramsey, Isle of Man, Argyll, Scotland. More to add.

1795 Medal BHM-399 Brass Royal Marriage MS63 PCGS #931109

William Woolley (1768-?): born England; married Sitie Probasco (1787-1868) 1804.

(c.1790) Tk 1/2D DH-76 Wicklow, Cronebane MS63BN PCGS #571608

Patrick Flinn (1799-1875): born Ireland; married Mary Eliza Bradshaw (1803-1869) 28 February 1830 Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada; died 27 September Antigonish, Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada.

1795 Tk 1/2D DH-352b Dublin, Parker's MS64BN PCGS #573265

Margaret Miller: born Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; married Joseph Paxon Jr. (1800-1838) 24 May 1810 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania;

(1625-44) 1/4D S-6526 MS62BN PCGS #655403

Thomas Mitchell: Born 19 January 1639 and died 1699 both at Ballinturley, Castle Strong, Roscommon, Ireland. Joan Smoote: Born 1625 in Ireland. Simon Hadley: Born 1640 West Meath, Kings County, Ireland. Died 6 June 1711 County Westmeath, Ireland. William Gregg, Jr.: Born 1642 Ardmore, Waterford, Ireland. Died 1 July 1687 New Castle, Colony of Delaware, British Colonial America. Martha Ann Wilkinson: Born 1644 Ardmore, Waterford, Ireland. Died 5 January 1692 Strand Milles, New Castle, Colony of Delaware, British Colonial America. Valentine Hollingsworth, Sr.: Born June 1632 Belleniskcrannel, Parish of Legoe, Aramagh County, Ireland. Buried in Friends Cemetery, Newark, New Castle, Delaware. Anne Ree: Belleniskcrannel, Segoe Parish, Armagh, Ireland. Died 1 April 1671 Moyraverty, Armagh, Ireland. George Robinson: Born 1636 Belleniskcrannel, Armagh, Ireland. Died 14 February 1694 New Castle, Delaware.

1739-Mo MF 2 R Calico-821 AU55 PCGS #167575

Martha Mitchell (1739-1832): born 21 July; married Lionel Worth (1737-1805) Massachusetts Bay, Colonial British America; died 18 April 1832 Starksboro, Addison, Vermont, United States. Mary Cashet (1739-1794): born Cane Creek, MM (Friend's Monthly Meeting), Orange, North Carolina, British Colonial America; married Capt. Joseph Hadley (1745-1793); died 19 November 1794 at Snow Camp, Alamance, North Carolina, United States. Elizabeth Mitchell (1739-1832): born 10 June St. George's Parish, Baltimore, Maryland, British Colonial America; married Gregory Farmer Barnes, Sr. (1734-1808) 30 November 1758 St. George's Parish, Baltimore, Maryland; died 18 April Hartford, Maryland, United States.

1769-Mo MF 8 R Calico-1095 AU58 PCGS #670062

Dorcas Sawyer (1769-1825): born 13 August Gloucester, Essex, Massachusetts Bay Colony, British Colonial America; married Jonathon Brown (1742-1809) 17 December 1789; died 29 September Gloucester, Essex, Massachusetts USA.

1745-Mo M 1/2 R Calico-270 MS64+ PCGS #670175

Jonathan Sawyer (1745-????): born August Gloucester. Essex, Massachusetts, British Colonial America; married Dorcas Parsons (1743-1828) 12 March 1767 in Gloucester. Capt. Joseph Hadley ()1745-1793): born 5 October NewCastle, Delaware, British Colonial America; married Mary Cashet (1739-1794); died Halifax, North Carolina, United States. Charity Wright (1745-1822): born 13 February Queen Anne Parish, Prince George's, Maryland, British Colonial America; married Isaac Cook (1743-1820) 1762 Bush River MM, Newberry, South Carolina, British Colonial America; died 13 November Chester Township, Clinton, Ohio,, United States. Caroline Eleanor Welsh (1745-1788): born Anne Arundel, Maryland, British Colonial America; married Elisha Riggs (1742-1777) in 1771; died Montgomery, Maryland, United States.

1741-Mo MF 4 R Calico-1124 AU50 PCGS #706896

Martha Samson (1741-1768): born 9 October Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts Bay Colony, British Colonial America; married John Goldsmith (1733-1812) 11 March 1762 Salem, Essex, Massachusetts Bay Colony, British Colonial America; died Essex, Massachusetts Bay Colony, British Colonial America.

1729 Ducat MS63 PCGS #174046

Graded MS65 by NGC #6505934-002

(1597) 1/2 Daal Delm-887 MS62 PCGS #917669

Phebe Deacon (1597-1663): born 3 April (?) Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire, England; married Bacchus Gould (1589-1668) 3 April 1617 Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire, England; died 20 September Topsfield, Essex, Massachusetts Bay Colony, British Colonial America. John Feilder (1597-1658): born Lodsworth, Sussex, England; married Elizabeth Nayle (1597-?) Grittleton, Wiltshire, England; died Grittleton, Wiltshire, England. Elizabeth Nail (1597-?): married John Feilder (1597-1658) Grittleton, Wiltshire, England. Andrew Sergeant (1597-1629). Stephen Gates (1597-1662): born 26 December Coney Weston, St. Edmundsbury Borough, Suffolk, England; married Ann Neave (1603-1662) 5 May 1628 Hingham, Norfolk, England; died 29 September Cambridge, Massachusetts Bay Colony, British Colonial America. Winifred Lovering (1597-1671): married William Holman Jr. (1594-1653) Northampton, Northamptonshire, England. Isaac Stearns (1597-1671): born Nayland, Suffolk, England; married Mary Barker (1604-1677) 20 May 1622 Stoke by Nayland, Suffolk, England; died 19 June Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts Bay Colony, British Colonial America. John Bundy Sr, (1597-1661): born Nottinghamshire; married Audrey Palmer (1594-1616); died 31 May Cornwell, Oxsfordshire, England. Susan Munter (1597-1690): died 7 March Massachusetts Bay Colony, British Colonial America. Andrew Warde (1597-1659): born Suffolk, England; married Hester Sherman (1606-1666) 1626; died 18 October Fairfield, Connecticut Colony, British Colonial America. Tryphosa Lee (1597-1655): married Stephen Tracy Jr. 2 January 1621 Leiden, South Holland, Netherlands.

1651 Daalder D-4870 MS63 PCGS #866868

Eytje Janse Stryker (1651-????): born Ruinen, Drenthe, Netherlands; married Christoffel Jurianse Probasco (1649-1724) in 1675 at Flatbush, Kings, New York Colony, British America. Jacobus DeBevoise (1651-1710) Leiden, Zuid Holland, Netherlands; married Maria Carelszen (1660-1710) 12 June 1678 at New York City, New York County, British America.

1702 4000 R KM-156 MS66 PCGS #737538

Marie Ann Purdue (1702-?): Christened 25 October St. Thomas, Winchester, Hampshire, England; married William Olding (1700-?) 14 November St. Lawrence, Hampshire, England. Maritje De Groot (1702-1763): Christened 18 January Brooklyn, Kings, New York Colony, British Colonial America; died after 10 August. John Mordecai Balderson (1702-1778): Born 22 September Norwich, Norfolk, England; married Hannah Cooper (1719-1792) 21 October 1737 Bucks, Pennsylvania, British Colonial America, died 9 July Solebury Township, Bucks, Pennsylvania, British Colonial America. Mary Davis (1702-1768): Born 9 January Davidsonville, Anne Arundel, Maryland, British Colonial America; married John Riggs (1687-1762) 16 January 1721 Anne Arundel, Maryland, British Colonial America; died 13 December Anne Arundel, Maryland, BCA.

1791 Tk 1/2D DH-2 Lanarkshire, Glasgow Bronzed PR64 PCGS #660302

William E. Morris (1791-1850): born 24 May Wayne, North Carolina; married Pearcy Edmundson (1793-1854) 1812 vermillion, Indiana; died 7 April Rocky Run, Indiana.

1560 Testoon S-5417 Francis & Mary AU58 PCGS #802877

FamilySearch.org LZ64-PB5 LZ64-533 GMFB-L5T

1717-J 2 R Calico-944 Segovia MS64 PCGS #261265

Susanna Stevens (1717-1753): born 25 March Pembroke, Plymouth, Massachusetts Bay Colony, British Colonial America; married David Pearce, Sr. (1713-1759) 20 January 1736 Gloucester, Essex, Massachusetts Bay Colony, British Colonial America. Comfort Haskell (1717-1809): born 22 May Gloucester, Essex, Massachusetts Bay Colony, British Colonial America; married Parker Sawyer (1719-1750) 10 November 1742. Lucy Fellows Stevens (1717-1806): born 2 June Stonington, New London, Connecticut Colony, British Colonial America; married Ephram Smith (1704-1774) 3 January 1744 Stonington, New London, Connecticut Colony, British Colonial America; died 4 May Montgomery, Pennsylvania, United States of America. Frances Taylor (1717-1792): born 26 January St. Peer's Parish, New Kent County, Province of Virginia; married William Stone III (1710-1777); died 5 June Fluvanna County, Virginia, United States of America. Amy Ann Walker (1717-1778): born 25 February New Kent, Virginia, British Colonial America; married Colonel Thomas Pettus (1712-1780) 10 November 1735; died 5 June Fluvanna, Virginia, British Colonial America. John Edmundson (1717-1780): born Craven, North Carolina, British Colonial America; married Mary Cullen (1725-1822); died Dobbs, North Carolina, United States of America. Hannah Jane McKay (1717-1754): born 1 July Augusta Parish, Augusta, Virginia, British Colonial America; married George Henry Hollingsworth (1712-1786) 19 December 1734 Chester, Pennsylvania, British Colonial America; died 9 March Winchester, Frederick, Virginia, British Colonial America.

1795-M MF 4 Esc Calico-1478 AU55 PCGS #689880

Margaret Miller (1795-?): born Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA; married Joseph Paxon, Jr. (1800-1838) 24 May 1810 Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.

1723 Penny Rosa Americana MS62 PCGS #125

Sarah Reynolds (1723-1808) LH6M-V3K Mary Fayle (1723-1797) LZLC-K8W Mordecai Michener Sr. (1723-1795) L6GJ-RMV Elizabeth (Rawlins/Rollins) Knight Nutter (1723-after 1770) LZ2Y-D2C

1766 1/2P William Pitt, Copper AU50BN PCGS #236

Mattye Probasco (1766-????): born 20 July in Middlesex, New Jersey, British Colonial America; married Peter Probasco (1759-1803) 8 September 1784 in New Brunswick, Middlesex, New Jersey. Josiah White ((1766-1812): born in Guilford, North Carolina, British Colonial America; died at Perquimans, North Carolina. Jeremiah Morris (1766-1826): born 15 October in Perquimans, North Carolina, British Colonial America; married Margaret Charles (1768-1854) 22 February 1789 at Contentnea, Pitt, North Carolina; died 15 September in Nahunta MM (Monthly Meeting?), Wayne, North Carolina.

1773 VA 1/2P Period MS63+ RB PCGS #241

$450 down, $500 5/27, $500 6/27 Mary Smith (1773-1839): Born Antigonish, Pictou, Nova Scotia; married James George Bradshaw (1781-1821) about 1802 Antigonish, Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada.

1795 Cent Talbot, Allum & Lee Lettered Edge MS65RB PCGS #641

Margaret Miller (1795-?) KH43-9LG

1787 Fugio New Haven Restrike, Brass MS66 PCGS #919

$1,450 (4 installments) starting 4/26 Sitie Probasco (1787-1868) MW1P-4NV: born 2 August New Brunswick, Middlesex, New Jersey; married William Woolley (1768-????).

1804 1/2C Crosslet 4, Stems MS64BN PCGS #1069

The two most obvious differences on 1804 Half Cents relate to the 4 of the date: on some coins the horizontal crossbar of the 4 ends with a vertical crosslet; on others the 4 has no crosslet. The Plain 4 is slightly more common than the Crosslet 4. Underlying the Crosslet 4 are individual die varieties: Cohen 1 Cohen 2 Cohen 4 Cohen 5 (early state of the Spiked Chin) Cohen 9 Cohen 10 Cohen 12 All of the Spiked Chin varieties are also Crosslet 4's, but the Spiked Chin designation takes precedence. Collectors should have no difficulty finding circulated examples of the Crosslet 4 Half Cent. Mint State versions are quite scarce, especially in grades above MS-63. Examples with original mint red are exceedingly scarce (most have toned to an olive- or chocolate-brown color) and none are known with full mint red.

1805 1/2C Large 5, Stems VF20BN PCGS #1090

The 1805 Large 5, Stems Half Cent is the second most common variety of the year, after the 1805 No Stems. The nomenclature used for 1805 Half Cents can be confusing. The Small 5 is indeed small but The Large 5 is actually a normal-sized 5 relative to the other digits in the date, while the Small 5 is indeed small. Perhaps the easiest way to tell them apart is by comparing the distance of the 5 relative to the bust. On the "Large" 5, the tip of the 5 is close to the bust; on the Small 5, the 5 is well away from the bust. Only a small number of Mint State 1805 Large 5, Stems Half Cents are known, most with little or no trace of original Mint Red. Red-Brown examples are exceedingly rare and nonw are known with full Mint Red.

1808 1/2C AU53BN PCGS #1107

1808 Half Cents are found with a "normal" date and an overdate (last 8 over a 7). "Normal" is in parentheses because the date is actually quite unusual -- the final 8 of the date was constructed by punching the zero of the denomination into the coin twice. Thus, the final 8 does not match the first 8 at all. The "Normal" 1808 Half Cent is one of the more common dates in the series. While several Unicrculated examples are known, none have earned the Red-Brown or Red designations. Thus, the collector is left with mostly Brown examples, with only a trace of original mint red at best.

1829 1/2C XF45BN PCGS #1153

The 1829 is one of the more common dates of the type, though it is not seen as often as dates like the 1828 and 1832-1835 (unlike some of those dates, the 1829 has never been found in hoards). Collectors are able to find circulated examples with relative ease and even Mint State examples are not hard to find. Most Mint State examples fall into the MS-63 grade, with good distribution in the MS-62 and MS-64 grades, as well. Red-Brown examples are very scarce and full Red examples are exceedingly rare (PCGS has certified only one Red example...a single MS-64 Red).

1855 1/2C MS65RD PCGS #1235

The 1855 Half Cent has the third highest mintage of the Braided Hair series. It is a common coin in most grades, up to and including MS-64. Gem Mint State examples are scarce but not rare. Of all the dates in this series, the 1855 is the most common in full Red condition...by far. PCGS has certified over two hundred Red examples, mostly in MS-64. Thus, for type collectors, this is a go-to date for exceptional color and quality. Both of the 5's in the date are slanted, which was typical of the 1850-1855 Half Cents. In 1856 a new font with an upright 5 was used. Only one die variety (Cohen 1) is known for this year.

1855 1C Upright 55 MS65BN PCGS #1907

1855 Large Cents come with two different date styles -- one has slanted 5's and the other has upright 5's. In all of the years preceding 1855, the 5's had some degree of slant, though perhaps not to the degree as seen on the 1855's. Both Slanted and Upright 5's are found on 1856 Large Cents, then the issue is settled with the 1857, which has Upright 5's only. The end of the Large Cent denomination after 1857 sealed their fate. According to the PCGS Population Report (as of March 2012), the Upright 5s variety is the more common of the two, though hundreds have been certified of each. No 1855 Large Cent (of either type) has earned a grade better than MS-66, and that includes all color variations. Amazingly, a handful of Full Red Gem examples have survived to satisfy and excite collectors.

1893 1C MS65RD PCGS #2186

The 1893 Indian Cent has an average mintage more or less. As there are several issues from the series which have significantly lower or higher mintages. This issue appears to be scarce in MS65 condition with no more than a few hundred known in this condition. In MS66 it is even scarcer with about 100 or so examples known. Anything grading higher is considered a condition census coin and less than a few dozen or so known grading higher than MS66.

1920 1C MS65RD PCGS #2524

The 1920-P Lincoln Cent is one of the more common dates from the 1920's. Examples up to MS65 can be purchased at a fair price. In MS66 they are scarce and command a strong premium over MS65 coins. In MS67 they are very difficult to locate and expect to pay a big premium in this condition or higher.

1922-D 1C MS65BN PCGS #2537

As a date, the 1922-D Cent is one of the most common of the 1920's, especially in terms of the number of certified examples. However, the real interest in this date comes from the fact that no Cents were produced at Philadelphia or San Francisco in 1922. Even better, this date is the "father" of the 1922 Plain (actually a 1922-D with a clogged mintmark). Collectors must be very careful with this date because of the degrees by which the mintmark disappears on some dies. Collectors must discern between 1922-D Cents with bold mintmarks, weak mintmarks, "ghost" mintmarks, and coins that appear to have no mintmark at all. The degree to which the mintmark disappears affects the value of the coin directly. Visible mintmarks (strong or weak) carry the least premium. "Ghost" mintmarks, where the mintmark is barely visible, qualify as "Weak Mintmarks", a die variant of the 1922-D, but one which carries a nice premium. Finally, the "Plain" version is the most valuable, and the one with the strong reverse is the most desirable.

1946-S 1C MS67RD PCGS #2749

Pop. 74/0 (1/14). Mintage: 198,100,000.

1956-D 1C MS67RD PCGS #2839

1956-D 1C MS67RD Pop. 52/1, (6/14). The 1956-D Lincoln Cent is common in MS66 condition or lower. In MS66+ it is much more difficult to find. In MS67 condition it is scarce but enough examples have been found to keep prices affordable for most serious Lincoln Cent collectors. MS67+ examples or higher are almost unheard of and are extremely scarce.

1975 1C MS67RD PCGS #2977

The 1975-P Lincoln Cent came well struck and examples up to MS66 are very common. In MS67 condition they are much scarcer, however with enough searching examples in this condition can be found or purchased. Anything grading higher than MS67 condition is considered rare. Pop. 99/6 (12/17) Mintage: 5,451,476,142.

1975-D 1C MS67RD PCGS #2979

The 1975-D Lincoln Cent came well struck. Examples up to MS66 condition or very common. In MS67 they are much scarcer. Enough coins exist to meet collectors demand, especially since the U.S. mint struck over 4.5 billion examples. Pop. 33/2, (7/14) Mintage: 4,505,275,300.

1978-D 1C MS67RD PCGS #2989

The 1978-D Lincoln Cent is very common and can be found in circulation very easily. Over 4 billion examples were produced making it very easy to obtain in most grades. It is only scarce in MS67 and anything grading higher is considered rare. Pop. 27/1 (6/14) Mintage: 4,280,233,400.

2003 1C MS69RD PCGS #3178

The 2003-P Lincoln Cent is one of the most common dates if not the most common date in the series. Coins can be found up to MS69 condition and maybe even close to perfect MS70 condition. The Mint struck over 3.3 billion making this a very common coin. In grades MS68 and MS69 it is one of the most affordable dates and might be the lowest priced circulation strike Lincoln Cent in MS68 or higher. Pop. 299/0 (10/10) Mintage: 3,300,000,000.

2003-D 1C MS69RD PCGS #3181

Pop. 118/0 (2/18) Mintage: 3,548,000,000.

1871 2C AU58BN PCGS #3609

The 1871 Two-Cent piece is the last of the high-mintage dates in this series. Though it's mintage was less than a million pieces, this date survives in Mint State to nearly the same extent as other dates with much higher mintages except for the 1864 and 1865. Red-Brown examples are plentiful up through MS64, above which the populations drop off, ending at MS66, where a single example is noted. Red examples are scarce, and are usually found in MS64 and MS65. Here, the best examples include two in MS66RD.

1861 3CS MS63 PCGS #3679

The 1861 Three Cent Silver has the highest mintage of any date in the 1860s, but this is a relative term, since the 1852 (the most common date in the series) has a mintage that is 375 times that of the 1861. This disparate relationship does not translate to the PCGS Population Report, where the census of the 1852 is only twice that of the 1861, but this is due to the fact that most circulated examples never make it to the grading services. The PCGS Condition Census contains a full complement of MS67 examples, meaning that collectors can find some wonderful examples on the market. The 1861 usually comes well struck, seldom with clashmarks, and often with rich, frosty luster. For type purposes, this is a great date, and one that offers excellent value.

1888 3CN MS66 PCGS #3757

The 1888 Three-Cent Nickel boasts the last of the "big" mintages from the 1880's, but at 36,501 pieces, the mintage is still tiny by any standard. This date compares favorably with the 1879, which has just a slightly higher mintage; both dates are priced nearly the same in all grades. Numerous Gem examples exist of this date, with dozens available in MS65, MS66, and MS67. In MS68, the population drops down to a mere one -- a lovely PCGS MS68 (which ranks as the finest known of this date). In general, this date comes well struck, and almost always shows all of the vertical lines in the Roman numeral III on the reverse. Picky collectors should select pieces with booming luster and as few carbon flecks as possible.

1876 5C MS66 PCGS #3805

The 1876 Shield Nickel has a slighter higher mintage than the 1875, and is slightly less valuable in all grades, mostly due to higher populations. Like most of the common Shield Nickels, this date is seen most frequently in MS-64, can be found withtout too much difficulty in MS-65, becomes scarce to rare in MS-66, and is unobtainable finer. As usual, this date comes with some interesting die cracks. Look for coins that show intense luster and which are as free of spots as possible.

1888 5C MS65 PCGS #3849

The 1888 Liberty Head Nickel has a mintage similar to that of the 1912-D, and both coins are valued similarly across the grade spectrum. Only eight other dates in the series have a lower mintage (nine, if you count the 1913 Liberty Nickel), making it one of the more popular, early dates. The most common Mint State grade for the 1888 Nickel is MS-64, followed by MS-63. Gems are scarce and superb exmples are essentially non-existent. The finest 1888 Nickel certified by PCGS (as of December 2011) is a single MS-66+. Collectors should seek spot-free examples that show a strong strike, especially on the obverse stars and the ear of corn on the lower left reverse.

1906 5C MS63 PCGS #3867

The 1906 Liberty Head Nickel set a new high bar for mintages in the Nickel series -- the 38 million plus pieces struck this years was the highest since the series was inaugurated in 1866. As expected, this date is very common, but like most of the dates in the 1900s, it is impossible to find truly superb examples. Per the PCGS Population Report, the best example certified by them is a single PCGS MS66+. No PCGS MS67 has appeared on the market in the 25+ years PCGS has beenb in business, and it is not for lack of trying...there is a cluster of MS66s just waiting to break the MS67 barrier.

1920 5C MS64 PCGS #3944

In circulated grades, the 1920 is about as rare as the other 1914 to 1924 era Philadelphia Mint Buffalo nickels. In uncirculated and Gem uncirculated condition, it is rarer than the 1914-1919 P Mints, with the exception of the rarer 1918. It is slightly rarer than the 1921 in Gem condition. Most 1920s are fairly well struck. Luster is more frosty than satiny.

1839 H10C No Drapery AU53 PCGS #4319

All 1839 Half Dimes are of the No Drapery type. Compared to the other dates of this type, the 1839 is relatively common. Collectors should have no trouble finding either circulated or Uncirculated examples. Most Mint State examples are in the MS63 to MS64 range, and even Gems are available in sufficient quantities to keep the price affordable. The very best 1839 No Drapery Half Dimes appear at the MS67 level. Most examples of this date are well struck. High-end examples feature intense, frosty luster and colorful eye appeal.

1842-O H10C VF30 PCGS #4331

The 1842-O Half Dime has one of the lower mintages of this series, yet it is still quite affordable in most grades. Most of the other dates in this series have higher surviving populations, so calling this an under-appreciated date is completely appropriate. The finest example is a single PCGS MS66. The overall strike characteristics are usually strong, and most examples show good detailing of the central devices. The only weakness, if any, usually appears on the details.

1843 H10C MS63 PCGS #4332

The 1843 Half Dimes is a fairly common coin and, like most of the P-Mint Half Dimes of the 1840's it has a mintage of over 1 million coins. In terms of pricing and value, the 1843 Half Dime tracks right along with the 1841, 1842, 1844, and the 1845. Mint State examples are just shy of common, but there are several outstanding pieces that elevate the lowest grade in the PCGS Condition Census to MS66 (the finest examples are at the MS67+ level). Most examples show strong details in the centers, but the 1843 Half Dime seems to always have some weakness, however slight, on the denticles. This is not unique to this date, as most Liberty Seated Half Dimes share this characteristic.

1845 H10C MS63 PCGS #4335

The 1845 Half Dime has the largest mintage of any date/mintmark combination from the 1840s, which translates into a common coin today. This date can be found readily in Mint State, where the most common grade is MS64. Gems are scarce and superb examples are semi-rare. Th best seen thus far is a single PCGS MS67+. Most examples are struck quite well and the overall eye appeal for this date is excellent.

1849 H10C AU55 PCGS #4341

The 1849 Half Dime has the second largest mintage of any Half Dime date from the 1840s. However, the date is split into three major varieties: 1849 Normal Date, 1849/8, and 1849/6. While the overdates take up some of the mintage, the remaining Normal Dates are still relatively common and are valued only slightly higher than the most common P-Mints. Most 1849 Half Dimes are struck well and show strong details, especially in the central areas of the dies.

1870 H10C VF35 PCGS #4396

The 1870 Liberty Seated Half Dime has one of the higher mintages in the series. However, despite it's very large mintage, a very small amount of coins have been confirmed to exist compared to its original mintage. The PCGS CoinFacts Rarity estimates about 1,000 examples exist, making it very scarce in all grades. In MS67 or higher it is considered rare, as very few examples exist in this condition.

1871 H10C MS64 PCGS #4398

The 1871 Half Dime is one of the most common dates in the series, though it is not as plentiful as dates such as 1837 Large Date, 1853 With Arrows, 1857, 1858, 1860, and 1872-S (Mintmark below wreath). Likewise, Mint State examples are reasonably plentiful, especially in the MS63 and MS64 grades. A dozen or so MS66 examples are known, but PCGS has certified only one MS67 example, with none finer (as of March 2011).

1805 10C 4 Berries XF40 PCGS #4477

The 1805 Dime has a mintage of 120,780 pieces, the second highest of the Draped Bust series, but only two varieties comprise the entire mintage. JR-1 has 5 Berries on the reverse and JR-2 has 4 Berries on the reverse. Both are of roughly equal rarity, though the 4 Berries reverse is slightly more common. The finest 1805 4 Berries reverse Dime is the amazing PCGS MS67 from the Knoxville Collection.

1839 10C No Drapery MS63 PCGS #4571

The 1839 Dime is a relatively common coin that can be found in most grades without too much difficulty, including in top condition. In fact, the PCGS CoinFacts Condition Census includes ten examples that are all MS67 or better. Die variety collectors can choose from nine different varieties (as enumerated by researcher Gerry Fortin), including one die pair that was used to strike both Proofs and coins for circulation. Among the most dramatic coins in the entire series of Liberty Seated Dimes is the 1839 "Pie-Shaped Shattered Obverse" Dime. This extremely rare variety shows heavy die cracks that split the obverse into three triangular areas of almost equal size.

1841-O 10C AU50 PCGS #4580

The 1841-O Dime has the second largest mintage for the entire denomination in the 1838-1852 era. However, it is certainly not the most common or the most available dates of the 1840s, mostly because the New Orleans Mint was far from the cities with the largest concentrations of collectors. Fewer than two dozen Mint State examples are known, most in the MS62 to MS64 grade range. PCGS has certified two MS65 examples of this date, with none better. What is remarkable is how inexpensive the finest known examples are. For instance, the Eliasberg-Simpson-Gardner example sold for $8,225 in October 2014. There are not too many other places where one can find a Top Pop early U.S. coin with a great pedigree for under $10,000. Most 1841-O Dimes are well-made, however the denticles can often be weak. 1841 was a transitional year for the reverse, The difference can be seen in the buds in the wreath. The old version has closed buds; the new version has open buds. Rarity premiums depend on specific varieties identified by Gerald Fortin at http://www.seateddimevarieties.com/Date_mintmark_variety.htm

1842 10C AU55 PCGS #4581

The 1842 Dime is a fairly common coin which behaves (if coins could behave) like the 1841 and 1843. These three dates have nearly identical total populations and there are similar quantities of Mint State examples of each date. The typical Mint State 1842 Dime is MS63 or MS64. Gems are very scarce and only a handful of MS66 examples sit atop the Condition Census. The strike quality of this date is good, though the stars, denticles, and lower right wreath are sometimes weak. Researcher Gerry Fortin has identified eight different varieties of the 1842 Dimes, one of which was used to strike Proof coins.

1870 10C MS63 PCGS #4651

The 1870 Dime is a common coin, though it is not nearly as plentiful as some of the other large-mintage dates of later years. Nonetheless, it is an affordable date in most grades. The typical Mint State 1870 Dime is MS63, with MS64 a close second. Gems are available -- for a price - but none are known in MS67. Gerry Fortin, who specializes in Liberty Seated Dimes, has identified six different die pairs (actually seven, but one [F-102] appears to have been delisted). One die pair is Proof-only, another was used to strike both Proofs and Mint State examples.

1876 10C MS65 PCGS #4679

In 1876, employees at the Philadelphia Mint produced a near-record number of Dimes -- over 11 mllion, second only to the massive mintage of over 12 million in 1853. If all mints are considerd, 1876 was a banner year in which over 30 million Dimes flowed out of Philadelphia, San Francisco, and Carson City. This was a record production that far outstripped any previous year. According to Walter Breen, this reason for this extra production was to replace the 10C Fractional Currency notes still in circulation. As might be expected, the 1876-P Dime is a very common coin, and one which can be found with ease in top conditions. Gems, even up to MS66, are fairly plentiful (the PCGS CoinFacts Condition Census starts at MS66). In Superb condition (MS67 and better), the 1876 Dime becomes very rare. The finest example appears to be a single NGC MS67+, but the price record belongs to a PCGS MS67. In 1876, William Barber created a new hub, thus two different reverses appear on 1876 Dimes. On the old, Type 1 reverse, the ribbon on the left side of the reverse has a split end with two points; on the new, Type II reverse, the ribbon on the left side of the reverse comes to a single point.

1876-CC 10C MS63 PCGS #4680

With its large mintage of over 8.2 million pieces, the 1876-CC is the most common Dime from the Mint at Carson City. As such, it is plentiful in most grades, including all Mint State grades from MS60 to MS66. In 1876, William Barber created a new hub, thus two different reverses appear on 1876 Dimes. On the old, Type 1 reverse, the ribbon on the left side of the reverse has a split end with two points; on the new, Type II reverse, the ribbon on the left side of the reverse comes to a single point. For the 1876-CC Dime, there is a huge disparity between the Type I and Type II reverses. Gerry Fortin has identified 35 different die varieties among the Type I reverses, but only a single die variety comprises all of the Type II reverses. Beware -- Fortin presents two 101 varieties for this date -- one for each of the reverse types. There's a big difference in value between the Type I F-101 and the Type II F-101 (the Type II version is twice as rare as the Type I).

1892 10C MS63 PCGS #4796

The 1892 Dime is the first date of the new type designed by Charles Barber. As a result, many were saved by collectors as a novelty, so high grade examples are fairly plentiful today. Nearly 1,000 examples have been certified in Mint State. most appearing in the MS63 and MS64 grade levels. Even Gems are plentiful up to the MS67 level, where less than a dozen have been certified by PCGS. A look at the PCGS Condition census for this date shows examples with some spectacularly colorful toning.

1979 10C MS67 PCGS #5155

Pop. 29/0 (6/14) Mintage: 315,440,000.

1875 20C XF45 PCGS #5296

In 1875, an entirely new denomination was added to the U.S. coin line-up -- the Twenty Cent piece. One would expect a huge fanfare to accompany the introduction of a new denomination, but the mintage of the inaugural year, at least at the Philadelphia mint, was meager at best. Apparently, the big need for the Twenty Cent piece was out West, where the San Francisco mint produced over 1 million examples and the Carson City mint struck over 133,000 pieces. Sadly, the Twenty Cent piece never caught on, in large part because of its similarity in size and appearance to the well-known Seated Liberty Quarter Dollar. In 1876, the mintages dropped precipitously and from 1877 to 1878 only Proofs were struck.

1806 25C VF35 PCGS #5314

The non-overdated 1806 Quarter is the collector's best choice for a representative example of the Draped Bust Type. The 1796 and 1804 Quarters are rare and expensive, the 1807 is seldom fully struck, the 1806/5 is s trifle bit more scarce, and the 1805 is hard to find in high grade. This leaves the 1806, which is semi-scarce (as are all Draped Bust Quarters), but it is the most plentiful of all the Draped Bust Quarters and it is the most available in Mint State (in full disclosure, the 1807 comes close). High grade examples are not rare, but they are expensive because collector demand for type coins of this period is so high. The PCGS CoinFacts Condition Census of the top ten examples starts at MS64 and ends at the MS65 level, where a couple of Gems reside. Non-overdated 1806 Quarters include nine separate die varieties.

1815 25C XF40 PCGS #5321

1815 is the first year for the Capped Bust Quarter type, and all known survivors are struck from a single die pair. In his “Early United States Quarters 1796-1838”, Steve Tompkins includes correspondence between Bailly Blanchard, head cashier of the Planters Bank of New Orleans, and Mint Director Robert L. Patterson, where Blanchard pleaded with Patterson to return only quarter dollars in exchange for the bank’s deposit of silver. After much hesitation, as no quarter dollar dies were available, Patterson gave in to Blanchard’s request, and production of the quarter dollar denomination was resumed. While regularly available in Choice grades, true Gems with original surfaces are elusive.

1821 25C XF40 PCGS #5331

The 1821 Quarter has one of the larger mintages of the series, though there is a possibility that some of that mintage belongs to 1820. Even so, the 1821 Quarter is fairly plentiful in most grades and can be found in Mint State with relative ease. There are quite a few, very nice 1821 Quarters. When compiling the PCGS CoinFacts Condition Census, we found at least a dozen MS65 and better examples. Most are attractively toned and some are prooflike (John Jay Pittman bought his 1821 Quarter as a Proof -- it is now in a PCGS MS65 holder). The strike on 1821 Quarters is also better than in the previous year, which is a plus for type collectors. For those that follow quality, the best 1821 Quarter is a PCGS MS67 that last appeared on the market in 2002 when it set a record price (for the date) of $66,125.

1855 25C Arrows AU55 PCGS #5435

After the frenetic pace of production of Quarter Dollars in the previous two years, things settled down at the Philadelphia Mint in 1855. Mint employees produced nearly three million Quarters -- still a healthy amount, but more than a four-fold reduction from the previous year. Most 1855 Quarters are well-struck, though some show occasional weakness on one or more of the obverse stars. High-grade examples are semi-scarce. Mint State examples cluster around the MS63 and MS64 grades but go as high as MS66 at POCGS. "Finest Known" honors could go to any one of the three PCGS MS66s, or the NGC MS67+* example from the Eric P. Newman collection that sold recently for a record $41,125.

1861 25C MS63 PCGS #5454

The 1861 Quarter Dollar has one of the largest mintages of the series, thus it is easy to obtain examples in virtually all grades. Hundreds of Mint State examples have been certified by PCGS, mostly in MS63 and MS64; even Gems are relatively common. The finest examples top out at MS67. Most 1861 Quarter Dollars are well struck. Some examples show die clashing in the right obverse field.

1876-S 25C MS64 PCGS #5503

The 1876-S Quarter Dollar has one of the higher certified populations of the Seated Liberty series. This date is plentiful in MS63 and MS64, and can even be found with patience in MS65. In MS66, this date is very rare and none have been certified finer by PCGS. High-grade examples will have a nice "look" and most will sport a strong strike and rich, frosty luster. This date is an exceptional value for type purposes.

1888 25C MS66+ PCGS #5520

Philadelphia Mint circulation strike quarters from 1879-1889 have low mintages ranging from 5,000 to 15,200. The reason for these tiny mintage figures was the Bland-Allison Silver Act of 1878. The Act mandated the minting of prodigious amounts of dollar coins to satisfy the demands of Western mining interests. This taxed the Mint's coining and die making machinery which resulted in meager production of sorely needed minor coinage. The situation was not corrected until 1892 with the introduction of the new Barber coinage. With survival estimates in the 15% range, circulation strike quarters of these dates were, and still are, highly sought by date collectors, and hoarded by some.

1946-D 25C MS67 PCGS #5831

Pop. 38/1 (6/14). The 1946-D is a relatively common coin in Gem condition. Luster and strike are not usually a problem.

1948-S 25C MS67 PCGS #5838

The 1948-S is relatively common in Gem condition. It is about of equal rarity to the 1948. Pop. 65/4 (6/14) Mintage: 15,960,000.

1985-P 25C MS67 PCGS #5918

The 1985-P Washington Quarter has a very high mintage of over 775 million coins struck. However, in MS66 condition and higher it is very scarce. Less than a couple hundred examples have been found in MS66 condition. In MS67 condition it is one of the tougher issues in the entire series, even more so than many of the Silver Quarters struck many years earlier. There are less than a handful of MS67 examples known for the 1985-P Washington Quarter with none being graded higher. Pop. 10/0 (11/17) Mintage: 775,818,962.

1985-D 25C MS67 PCGS #5919

Pop. 11/1 (3/17) Mintage: 519,962,888.

2001-D 25C North Carolina MS68 PCGS #5969

Pop. 57/0 (11/17) Mintage: 427,876,000.

2001-P 25C Rhode Island MS68 PCGS #5970

Pop. 297/3 (11/17) Mintage: 423,000,000. The 2001-P Rhode Island Quarter was officially released on May 21, 2001. The obverse features the same George Washington motif used from 1999 to date. The reverse features a vintage sailboat gliding through Narragansett Bay. Most examples of the Rhode Island Quarter were well struck. Examples in MS68 appear to be scarce but possibly thousands still exist in rolls and bags. In MS69 they are very difficult to come by and very few examples are known in this condition or higher.

2001-D 25C Rhode Island MS68 PCGS #5971

Pop. 41/0 (4/18) Mintage: 447,100,000.

1803 50C Large 3 XF45 PCGS #6066

1803 Half Dollars are found with either a Large or a Small 3 in the date. The most noticeable difference between the two varieties is the thickness and shape of the top bar and serif of the 3's. The Large 3 is a fairly common variety and appears to be roughly five times more common than the Small 3 variety. The 1803 Large 3 Half Dollar is extremely rare in Mint State, with only five examples certified thus far by PCGS (as of February 2012). The finest example certified by PCGS is a single MS-64.

1811 50C Large 8 VF35 PCGS #6096

1811 Half Dollar are found with two different date sizes: Large 8 and Small 8. The Small 8 appears on all Capped Bust Half Dollars from 1807-1810; the Large 8 became the norm from 1811 on. Two Overton varieties qualify as Large 8s: O-103 and O-104. Both varieties are fairly easily obtained. As of August 2011, PCGS listed 358 Large 8 1811 Half Dollars in their Population Report, of which nearly 100 are Uncirculated. The typical Mint State grade is MS63, followed by MS62. The 8 on the Large 8 50C appears to be slightly LARGER than the adjacent 1s. The SHAPE of the 8 is more of a "ball on ball" type. On the Small 8 variety, the 8 is SMALLER than the adjacent 1s. The graded populations of both varieties are fairly close as are the Mint State populations. As of this writing, the Large 8 shows two graded MS-66 at the top and four in MS-65. The Small Date has one MS-67, one MS-66 and one MS-65.

1813 50C AU55 PCGS #6103

The 1813 Half Dollar comes in two major varieties: Normal and 50/UNI. This narrative covers the former, which comprises the vast majority of 1813 Half Dollars. As a date, the 1813 Half Dollar is readily obtainable in most grades. Mint State examples are scarce, but cannot be considered rare because they are almost always available on the market. However, some individual varieties are quite rare and they are nearly impossible to find in Mint State (see the individual variety pages for more expansive write-ups). When all the 1813 Half Dollars are ranked together, there is a single coin that stands head-and-shoulders above the rest. That coin is the remarkable PCGS MS67 (formerly NGC MS67+*) from the Eric Newman Collection. Mr. Newman paid $5 for the coin sometime in the 1940's; when it sold at auction in 2013, it brought $141,000. The new proud owner is mega-collector, Bob Simpson. The rest of the PCGS CoinFacts Condition Census for 1813 Half Dollars consists of MS65 and better examples. The strike quality of 1813 Half Dollars varies widely because each variety has its own unique characteristics. The following varieties appear to have some of the best details: O-103, O-105, O-106a, and O-107a (there may be others).

1817/3 50C VF30 PCGS #6111

The 1817/3 Half Dollar is an enigmatic overdate that defies explanation. If it were a leftover die from 1813, one would expect the 13th obverse star to show the notched point that is believed to be the "signature" of engraver John Reich. Reich resigned his position in March 1817, after which the notching of the stars ended. This suggests that the new engraver simply made an error by punching a 3 into the die, then corrected it with the proper 7 punch. But, why would the engraver have picked up a punch for a 3? That would have been an egregious oversight on the engraver's part, especially since he was four year's away from a need for a 3, plus there is no U.S. coin from 1817 where a 3 might be used in either a legend, motto, or denomination. Regardless of the reason for this variety, it is extremely popular with collectors. Only one die combination (Overton 101, and it's later die state Overton 101a) utilize this obverse. In most grades, the 1817/3 Half Dollar is fairly common, but in Mint State, it becomes very rare.

1823 50C AU58 PCGS #6131

The 1823 Half Dollar is a common date in the Capped Bust series thanks to a rather hefty mintage of nearly 1.7 million coins. This date is available in a full range of grades and can be found with relative ease. Variety specialists focus on the date, where three major variants are found: Broken 3, Patched 4, and Ugly 3 (plus the Normal 3). On these varieties, the 3 of the date appears deformed because of a faulty punch and/or repairs made to it. In addition to the these major varieties, specialists have identified thirteen different die varieties, as well as some interesting die states. Circulated examples of the 1823 Half Dollar are very common. Even Mint State examples are readily available, usually in MS62 and MS63, and less frequently in MS64. Gem examples are very rare and none are known above MS66. Virtually all of the top-condition 1823 Half Dollars feature impressive color and eye appeal.

1824 50C AU55 PCGS #6137

1824 Half Dollars are found with a "normal" date and different overdates (1824/1, 1824/4, and 1924 over various overdates). As a date, the 1824 Half Dollar is relatively common, with over 1,300 graded by PCGS alone (as of June 2011). The "normal" date is the most common of the 1824 varieties -- by far -- with over 900 graded by PCGS in all grades. In Mint State, the 1824 "normal" date is available in a variety of grades, most usually MS-64. As expected, Gems are quite rare. The finest example certified by PCGS is an amazing MS-68, one of only two Capped Bust, Lettered Edge Half Dollars to have received that grade at PCGS since the company's inception in 1986.

1842 50C Medium Date AU53 PCGS #6239

Quickfinder Notes: The Medium Date comes with the Rev of 1842. It is easily distinguished by the crossbar of the 4 which ends in a CROSSLET. The Small Date used much smaller numeral punches with a PLAIN end to the crossbar of the 4. The Medium Date is about two and a half times more common than the Small Date.

1843 50C XF40 PCGS #6243

The 1843 Half Dollar is a common coin with the largest mintage of the series since the series began in 1839 (in fact, the mintage would not be exceeded until 1854). Circulated examples are plentiful and even Mint State coins can be found with ease. The PCGS CoinFacts Condition Census starts at MS60 and goes to MS65. However, the finest example is the monster NGC MS67* from the Eric Newman and Eugene Gardner collections.

1849-O 50C XF45 PCGS #6263

The 1849-O Half Dollar boasts a hefty mintage of over 2.3 million coins. However, that did not translate into a large number of Mint State examples. Either no one thought they would turn out to be rare or the collectors were too far away to obtain examples before they entered circulation. Of the Mint State examples that exist today, most are in the MS63 to MS64 range. Gems are exceedingly rare and we know of no superb examples. Luster on the 1849-O Half Dollars goes from soft and frosty to bright and almost proof-like. Don't expect a sharp strike on this dare; invariably, most of the obverse stars will appear flat and weakly defined.

1861-O 50C AU55 PCGS #6303

In a survey of the members of the Liberty Seated Collectors Club, published in the March 2008 issue of the Gobrecht Journal, the 1861-O Half Dollar was ranked ninth among the Ten Greatest New Orleans Seated Coins: "This issue had the highest mintage of the New Orleans mint coins under consideration for this listing but it was the last Seated coin struck at this branch mint before it was taken over by the Confederacy. Examples of this issue are in demand as the only collectible coin struck by the CSA. Many thousands exist and they can be obtained in all grades including mint state. Randy Wiley described 14 collectible die marriages for this date in Issue #94 of the journal and this group of coins would make a nice set in itself for the Seated half dollar specialist. Of particular interest would be the existence of some 1861-O proof coins that were listed by Randy Wiley in Issue #97 of the journal. Most recently an example described as Brilliant Proof was sold for $17,250 in the Stack's auction of the Byers Collection in October 2006. This issue received scattered support from the respondents, most likely a function of a member's interest in the Civil War and the coins struck during this period in US history."

1876 50C MS64 PCGS #6352

1876 saw a high-water mark set for production of Half Dollars -- 8,418,000 coins to be exact. No U.S. Mint in any location had ever poduced that many Half Dollars since the inception of coinage in 1794, nor would that mark be met or exceeded until 1917. Thus, the 1876 Half Dollar is generally considered to be the most common and most affordable of all the Seated Liberty Half Dollars. Hundreds of them have been certiified by PCGS in Mint State, usually in grades from MS62 to MS64. Gems become a little scarce and anything above MS65 is highly desirable. Despite the large production of 1876 Half Dollars, quality did not suffer. Nonetheless, we recommend that collectors seek out fully struck examples for their collections.

1876-S 50C AU50 PCGS #6354

1876-S Half Dollars were produced in large quantities (over 4.5 million pieces) and they are plentiful in most grades. Collectors have scores to choose from in Mint State and most of those are well-struck. Little did the Mint employees know in 1876 that their facility would soon be shutting down production of Half Dollars after 1880. However, they still had one more year of near-record production before their rest. For the quality-minded collector, it is very difficult to find an 1876-S Half Dollar better than MS65.

1888 50C XF40 PCGS #6370

The 1888 Half Dollar has the largest mintage of any of the Half Dollars of the 1880's, but 12,001 coins is admittedly a very small quantity by any measure. Even the vaunted 1878-S Half Dollars has a mintage of 12,000 coins and it is worth tens of thousands of dollars even in the lowest grades. Because of the small mintage, most 1888 Half Dollars are either Prooflike and/or highly reflective, and they are often confused with Proofs. Hundreds of certified Mint State examples exist, with dozens available in each of the grades from MS62 to MS66. Superb 1888 Half Dollars are true condition-rarities.

1892 50C MS63 PCGS #6461

A new design appeared on Half Dollars beginning in 1892 and it was an immediate hit with collectors. Today, Population Report data confirms David Akers' old and long-held belief that the 1892 Half Dollar was the most common date of the series. No other date has a larger population -- some are close, but none can equal or exceed it. For today's collectors, this means there are numerous opportunities to acquire a high-grade example of this first-year-of-issue date. PCGS has certified literally hundreds of Mint State examples, mostly in MS63 and MS64. Moving up and through the Gem and Superb categories, we come to a single PCGS MS68 example, one of the finest Barber Half Dollars of any date. This colorful example has appeared at auction three times since 2005 and it set price records every time it appeared. For approximately half the price, collectors can opt for one of the lovely PCGS MS67+'s.

1920 50C MS63 PCGS #6580

In mint state condition, the 1920 is not quite as rare as the 1918, but the two coins are about equal rarity in Gem (MS65 or better) condition. A Gem MS65 1920 is a rare coin and grades above MS65 are very rare. The 1920 is almost always very well struck. The luster is the soft satiny look of the earlier Walkers.

1946 50C MS67 PCGS #6627

Pop. 50/3 (6/14). Mintage: 12,118,000. In Choice Uncirculated condition, the 1946 is the rarest of the 1941 to 1947 Walking Liberty half dollars, though the 1947 is a close second. As in the case with all Philadelphia Walkers, strike is not a problem with this issue. There are many very frosty, fully lustrous Gems.

1946-S 50C MS67 PCGS #6629

1946-S 50C MS67 Pop. (53/2) (6/14). Mintage: 3,724,000. Trumpet tail S. Splendid aquamarine, cherry-red, and autumn-brown toning encompass this lustrous and well-preserved Superb Gem. The strike is bold for a San Francisco issue, though the branch hand exhibits blending. Marks are limited to the rock above the AR in DOLLAR. Population: 54 in 67 (2 in 67+), 0 finer (4/14).

1978 50C MS67 PCGS #6733

In 1978 the U.S. Mint began to significantly decrease the mintages to circulating Kennedy Half Dollars. For the 1978-P Kennedy Half Dollar, the Mint struck a little over 14 million examples. The previous year it struck over 40 million. And most years prior to that the Mint struck some dates in the hundreds of millions. Most 1978-P Kennedy Half Dollars are common in MS65 condition or lower. In MS66 condition you really have to search hard through Mint Sets or rolls to find them. In MS67 condition or higher they are very difficult to find. Pop. 28/0 (2/15) Mintage: 14,350,000.

1985-P 50C MS67 PCGS #6747

The 1985-P Kennedy Half Dollar is considered a common issue, as it had a mintage of well over 18 million, which is somewhat average for the series. Especially if compared to Kennedy Half Dollars from 2004 and after, where most dates and mint marks have mintages under 3 million. It is scarce in MS66 grade and in MS67 or higher, it is very difficult to find. Pop. 57/1 (4/10) Mintage: 18,706,962.

1985-D 50C MS67 PCGS #6748

From the 1980's to about the year 2000, the Mint was producing about 20-30 million Kennedy Half Dollars from each Mint each year. Therefore, the 1985-D is a common issue since it's mintage is close to 20 million coins struck. It is only scarce in MS67 condition or higher. Anything grading less than MS67 is fairly common and can be purchased very inexpensively. Pop. 83/0 (3/13) Mintage: 19,814,034.

2001-P 50C MS68 PCGS #6780

This is the last year in which the Mint released Kennedy Half Dollars into circulation. Beginning in 2002, the Mint began selling the coins to collectors through bags and rolls. Therefore, in 2002 mintages dropped considerable compared to previous years. Pop. 190/2 (11/17) Mintage:21,200,000.

1843 $1 XF45 PCGS #6929

The 1843 Silver Dollar is a relatively common coin, on par with most of the other dates from the 1840's. In Mint State, the 1843 Silver Dollar is scarce, and usually found in baggy MS-62 and MS-63. Gem examples are essentially non-existent, and the finest examples certified by PCGS (as of November 2011) are five MS-64s.

1871 $1 VF35 PCGS #6966

Distribution: While many 1871 Liberty Seated dollars probably were exported to China, the mintage was so large that pieces are common today. It is likely that large numbers remained stateside in Treasury vaults and were released into circulation beginning in autumn 1876, when specie payments were resumed. Some were returned to the Treasury, bagged, and not released until 1962-1964. The 1871 Liberty Seated silver dollar was the first with a mintage to cross the million mark, and was just one of two dates to achieve this level, the other being 1872.

1875-S T$1 MS63 PCGS #7039

Large mintage: The production quantity of trade dollars at the San Francisco Mint in 1875 was immense. Included in the monthly figures (see Summary of Characteristics) were several months' production which on their own would have been satisfactory for a year in earlier times; namely, January 695,000, April 652,000, May 535,000, October 614,000, November 517,000, and December 516,000. These numbers when added to the figures for other months comprised a total of 4,487,000 pieces, a record for the series. While the majority of such coins were exported, thousands went into circulation on the West Coast, particularly in the San Francisco area, where they traded at face value in commercial transactions. Possibly the largest exporter was the Nevada Bank of San Francisco. Mint officials rested easy, knowing that the silver-mining interests (and their congressional friends, Senators Allison and Jones and Representative Richard P. Bland) were satisfied in the knowledge that the market for the metal was strong. The Oriental demand was great, and domestically a good future awaited the continuing coinage of fractional pieces (from the dime through the half dollar), which were being minted in very large quantities to redeem Fractional Currency notes and to restore silver to United States commerce. Mint officials rested easy, knowing that the silver-mining interests (and their congressional friends, Senators Allison and Jones and Representative Richard P. Bland) were satisfied in the knowledge that the market for the metal was strong. The Oriental demand was great, and domestically a good future awaited the continuing coinage of fractional pieces (from the dime through the half dollar), which were being minted in very large quantities to redeem Fractional Currency notes and to restore silver to United States commerce. Mint State grades: In MS-65 the 1875-S is the most available of all trade dollars. I estimate that 75 to 150 or more exist. Most are decent strikes and are quite lustrous. At the MS-64 level I believe that 200 to 400 or more exist, while I estimate 500 to 1,000 or more as the population for MS-63 coins. In grades from MS-60 to 62, an estimated 1,500 to 3,000 or more survive. Many Uncirculated coins were brought to the United States from Hong Kong in the 1940s and 1950s. Most (about 80% to 90%) Mint State coins are Type I/I; the rest are Type I/II.

1888-O $1 MS65 PCGS #7184

Hoard coins: Like many of its sister New Orleans issues, the 1888-O dollars dribbled out of government storage and into the coin market in small quantities in 1946 and during the 1950s, especially from about 1955 to 1957-1958. Some of these came from the Treasury Building in Washington, D.C., where they had been stored since the New Orleans Mint ceased operations. In 1957, Harry J. Forman was one of several dealers who had this issue for sale in large quantities. Circulated grades: Circulated 1888-O Morgan dollars are very common in all grades up through and including AU-58. Mint State grades: This issue is very plentiful in Mint State, particularly in grades from MS-60 to MS-62, of which 100,000 to 200,000 are believed to exist, although this estimate may be on the low side-particularly if the Philadelphia vault hoard was larger than thought. MS-63 coins are plentiful. MS-64 coins are also common, perhaps to the extent of 20,000 to 35,000 coins. At the MS-65 level, the 1888-O is slightly scarce, with an estimated population of 4,000 o 8,000 pieces. The strike of 1888-O dollars varies from weak to sharp but is usually average to weak, with average to dull lustre. Cherrypicking is advised to acquire sharp specimen

1888-S $1 MS63 PCGS #7186

Production low: For reasons that are not clear, production of silver dollars remained low at the San Francisco Mint during this era. The greatest mintages occurred in Philadelphia and New Orleans. Hoard coins: The market and hoard history of the 1888-S bears a close resemblance to its cousin, the 1887-S. On the numismatic market the 1888-S was considered to be quite scarce in Mint State, until bags were released in 1942 from storage in the San Francisco Mint. From then until the mid-1950s, quantities could be obtained for face value from that source. In 1956, bags were released in Montana. However, dealer and collector interest was limited, and investor interest was nil. Most that were paid out went to Nevada casinos or to banks, where they were put into circulation and quickly descended the grading ladder in AU or lower levels. Mint State grades: Mint State 1888-S dollars are scarce in comparison to certain earlier San Francisco Mint dollars of the decade, but on an absolute basis they are often encountered. Most specimens are in lower Mint State levels from MS-60 through 62, at which plateau an estimated 30,000 to 50,000 remain, above which are 10,000 to 18,000 MS-63 coins. MS-64 1888-S dollars are scarce, with an estimated population of 3,000 to 5,000. In the context of the series, it is not stretching things to call an MS- 65 rare, with perhaps 400 to 700 believed to survive. The striking quality of 1888-S dollars is often unsatisfactory. Specimens are usually weakly struck at the centers. However, sharply struck coins also exist in large numbers. The lustre varies from satiny to frosty but is often the latter.

1890-CC $1 MS63 PCGS #7198

Record mintage: The 1890-CC was minted in larger quantities than any other Carson City silver dollar. Many were released into circulation in the nineteenth century. Hoard coins: After the Carson City Mint closed down its coinage facilities, quantities of undistributed dollars remained there. Later, many bags were shipped to the San Francisco Mint and to the Treasury Building in Washington, D.C., for storage. In 1942-1943 many bags of 1890-CC dollars were paid out at face value by the San Francisco Mint. Probably two or three bags went to dealers and collectors at the time, and the rest went into circulation in the West, particularly in Nevada. Mint State grades: Mint State coins are scarce, though readily available, in grades from MS-60 through 62, at which levels an estimated 20,000 to 50,000 remain, thanks more to Treasury releases of the 1950s than to G.S.A. sales. In the MS-63 category I suggest that 10,000 to 20,000 survive, above which level the 1890-CC becomes quite scarce. Only about 3,000 to 5,000 MS-64 coins are known, and in MS-65 or better preservation, only 1,000 to 2,000.

1890-O $1 MS63 PCGS #7200

Hoard coins: Probably at least 500,000 of these, if not far more, were held by the Treasury (and stored in Philadelphia) until the 1960s, and released during the 1962-1964 era. Earlier, 1890-O dollars had been paid out over a long period of decades, with an especially large release occurring in 1953-1954, with the result that 1890-O dollars in Mint State have been neither rare nor expensive. Mint State grades: As a class, Mint State 1890-O dollars are common. However, most of these are in lower grade levels, with an estimated 60,000 to 100,000 at the MS-60 to 62 demarcation. MS-63 coins are also relatively easy to find, with a population of 40,000 to 70,000. In MS-64 grade the 1890-O becomes scarce; about 10,000 to 18,000 exist. Full MS-65 coins are quite scarce, especially if sharply struck, and I believe that if each and every one could be counted, the total would be only 1,000 to 2,000.

1890-S $1 MS63 PCGS #7202

Hoard coins: Quantities of 1890-S dollars were placed into circulation at or near the time of mintage. Many others were stored in the San Francisco Mint, from which location several million or more probably were melted under the terms of the 1918 Pittman Act. In addition, over a long period of years, occasional bags were released. As a result, the 1890- S is one of the San Francisco Mint issues that has never been rare in Mint State-quite a contrast to its 1889-S sibling. Mint State grades: The 1890-S is one of the more available Morgan dollars in Mint State, although it is not among the most common. Probably, 45,000 to 80,000 exist in the MS-60 to 62 area, although MS-63 specimens, of which an estimated 15,000 to 25,000 survive, are readily available. MS-64 coins are slightly scarce, and number about 10,000 to 18,000. MS-65 examples are scarcer yet and have a population of, perhaps, 2,000 to 3,000. Most 1890-S Morgan dollars are well struck (with superb definition of the eagle's breast feathers) and have excellent lustre. Many have prooflike surfaces. Some show large numbers of tiny raised lines-die polishing marks-in the fields. Cherrypicking is advised when you buy, but this will be a casual effort at best as most pieces are quite nice.

1892 $1 MS63 PCGS #7212

Once a rarity: From the time of mintage through the early decades of the twentieth century, the 1892 was a major rarity. Very few had been released into circulation. However, Proofs were available readily enough, and they took care of the need to acquire a circulation strike of the date. This situation was true of such other Philadelphia Morgan dollar dates as 1894, 1897, and 1899, among others. The relatively few transactions involving Mint State 1892 dollars sold prior to 1940 did not take place at high prices. Accordingly, the erstwhile rarity of this date was not recognized until I researched the matter in connection with the present text.

1892-CC $1 MS63 PCGS #7214

Hoard coins: When the Carson City Mint closed down, quantities of 1892-CC dollars were shipped for storage to the San Francisco Mint and, to a lesser extent, to the Treasury Building in Washington, D.C. From the San Francisco Mint, quantities were paid out over a period of years, including 1925-1926, but particularly in the late 1940s and early 1950s. Some bags, but probably not many, were dispersed from the Cash Room at the Treasury Department in Washington during the same time frame, up through 1950-1953. Then came a quantity dispersal. Dealer Steve Ruddel stated that about 50 bags (50,000 coins) of 1892-CC dollars were released from the Treasury Building in 1955 alone. (Reference: His advertisement in The Numismatist, January 1964.) Historically, the 1892-CC, like the 1990-CC and 1891-CC before it, was never considered to be a rare date. Enough were dispersed at or near the time of mintage that examples have been readily available on the market. However, in comparison to some of the 1878-1885 Carson City dollars sold by the G.S.A. in the 1970s, the 1892-CC is relatively elusive today.

1892-O $1 MS63 PCGS #7216

Hoard coins: The 1892-O dollar has always been available in Mint State on the coin market. For example, in 1910 a specimen sold at auction at $1.25, a common-date price. Generous quantities were released at and immediately following the time of mintage. In later years enough remained in numismatic circles that dollar specialists always had them in stock. A few bags were released in the 1950s, from storage in the Treasury Building in Washington, D.C. However, the great deluge of this issue came during the unsealing in October 1962 of a vault in the Philadelphia Mint holding about 10 million Uncirculated New Orleans dollars. After that time, Harry J. Forman handled at least 20 bags and reported that the issue was very common in bag quantities, although the price never dipped much below about $5.00 per coin, and was more apt to be in the $7.50 to $12.50 range in the several years after 1964. Just before the October 1962 release, a typical Uncirculated coin was worth about $15.00. The Redfield estate, auctioned by the Reno Probate Court in 1976, is said to have had two to four bags, with the coins heavily damaged by a counting machine used during the pre-auction appraisal. In 1977 a bag from another source, said to have contained numerous gems (see below), was dispersed. In the 1980s, Bowers and Merena Galleries handled a bag of 1892-O dollars from a Pennsylvania estate. Most coins in the group were in the range of about MS-62 to MS-63.

1893 $1 MS63 PCGS #7220

Circulated grades: The 1893 is readily available in worn grades, but among Philadelphia Mint Morgan dollars the 1893 is one of the more elusive dates. Most circulation strike 1893 dollars are decent strikes but have somewhat "greasy" lustre, not a deep frosty surface. Others are lightly struck at the centers and often have dull lustre. Once again, cherrypicking for quality is advised. Lower range coins are apt to have smaller (less heavy or damaging) bagmarks than seen on many other Morgan dollars. Higher grade coins with minimum bagmarks are often found as well. Most coins known today are in lower ranges such as MS-60 to 62, of which probably 30,000 to 60,000 exist. MS-63 coins, with an estimated population of 10,000 to 20,000, are more elusive. Rarer still are MS-64s, of which possibly 4,000 to 8,000 survive. Rarest of all are MS-65 or better pieces, which exist to the extent of only 400 to 800 coins.

1898 $1 MS64 PCGS #7252

Hoard coins: The 1898 was released in large quantities by the Treasury Department through the Federal Reserve, so that by the mid-1950s Mint State coins were very common in eastern banks. However, before that time Uncirculated coins were scarce, or even rare. Additional large quantities were released in the late 1950s and early 1960s. By the mid-1970s, most such quantities had been widely dispersed, with the result that the Redfield estate holding, estimated to have been about 16 to 18 bags, was a novelty at the time. Most of these Redfield coins went to John Kamin, publisher of The Forecaster newsletter.

1898-O $1 MS65 PCGS #7254

Hoard coins: If you had been a collector of Uncirculated Morgan dollars in September 1962, high on your want list would have been the 1898-O, along with the 1903-O, and 1904-O. These three were the most formidable rarities among Mint State New Orleans dollars, and even the most in-depth dealer's stock was not likely to have an example of anyone of the three. If you could have found one, it would have set you back $300 to $400 or more. The current Guide Book listed the value at $300, or double the price of the 1889-CC. A bag of 1,000 coins, if such existed, would have had a theoretical market value of over $300,000! But, not to worry. None was to be had, although a few bags had come out of storage in the Treasury Building in Washington, D.C. in the 1940s and early 1950s and, except for a few hundred pieces that went into dealers' stocks, the coins had slipped into circulation.

1921 $1 Morgan MS65 PCGS #7296

An unnecessary coinage: The coinage of Morgan silver dollars in 1921 was accomplished under the provision of the Pittman Act of April 23, 1918, which mandated that hundreds of millions of older silver dollars be melted down into bullion, and that the government should take the proceeds and buy new silver for a price of $1 per ounce, a considerable premium over current market levels. This was a sop to Western silver mining interests. While the Bland-Allison Act of 1878 and the Sherman Silver Purchase Act of 1890 mandated the purchase of unneeded, unwanted silver bullion at current market price, the Pittman Act dictated that the government pay considerably more than market. As usual, American taxpayers bore the brunt of the effect. There was little interest at the Mint in the recoinage program, and it was deemed expedient to resurrect the old Morgan design for further use. The earlier hubs had been destroyed in 1910, when no-body expected any further coinage of Morgan dollars. Morgan (with help from J.R. Sinnock) made copy hubs based on an 1878 7 Tailfeathers PAF, but in shallower relief and much poorer quality. Apparently, the original hubs had been destroyed or were deemed unfit for use, so new transfer hubs were made, these being of shallower relief and much poorer quality that those used during the earlier era. Numismatic Information Commentary: In 1921, the Mint redesigned the Morgan dollar. The new coin was in shallow relief with many features less well defined than on earlier (1878-1904) issues. Comparison of a 1921 Morgan dollar (from any of the three mints) with an issue from the early 1900s will show many differences. On the obverse of the 1921, the portrait of Miss Liberty is very shallow, and the cheek is almost flat; the lines of her hair are bolder and better defined; and there is no crease above her chin, among other distinctions. On the reverse of the 1921, the eagle is flat with virtually no breast feather detail, the arrow feathers are parallel (copied after an 1878 7 tail feathers, parallel arrow feathers, reverse), and the stars are slightly larger. In 1910, six years after the last coinage, the Engraving Department at the Philadelphia Mint believed that the days of the Morgan dollar were gone forever, and old hubs were destroyed. When the order came in 1921 to rush production of more Morgan dollars, new hubs were made by George T. Morgan and John R. Sinnock, but in shallow relief in order to facilitate quantity striking in a hurry. It was realized that one thing the world needed was not more silver dollars, and that most would simply go into storage (where countless millions of earlier dates already were in moldering bags). There was no need to consider aesthetic appeal.

1921-D $1 MS65 PCGS #7298

1921 is the last year in which the Mint struck Morgan Silver Dollars. The coins were struck from the large and famous Nevada Silver discovery, the Comstock Lode. The 1921-D Morgan Dollar is also the only Morgan Silver Dollar that was struck at the Denver Mint. Despite being the last year of the Morgan Dollar it is also the only year in which you can obtain an example from each three different Mints. Which are the 1921 Philadelphia, Denver and San Francisco Morgan Dollars. Commentary: The 1921-D Morgan dollar is distinctive as the only Denver Mint coin of this design. A set of Morgan dollars from the different mints included Philadelphia, Carson City, New Orleans, San Francisco, and, now, Denver. The D mintmark is tiny on all issues; Micro D. Some coins were struck from die(s) with the D shallowly impressed; the mintmark is scarcely visible. In keeping with Philadelphia Mint coins, 1921-D dollars were struck from redesigned shallow-relief dies. Hoard coins: Vast quantities of Mint State 1921-D dollars were released in the 1950s and early 1960s. The issue was considered common, and most dealers did not desire to buy them. Today, original mintsealed bags are few and far between, but the coins themselves are common. However, far fewer Mint State 1921-D dollars exist than do 1921 Philadelphia Issues. Circulated grades: In worn grades, 1921-D dollars are exceedingly common. AU coins are difficult to distinguish from MS-60. An estimated 1.5 to three million circulated pieces survive. Mint State grades: The typical Mint State coin is in lower grades such as MS-60, 61, or 62, and is an average strike, but some are well struck. As the dies were in shallow relief, a sharp strike is not as distinctive as one of the earlier 1878-1904 era. The surfaces are often frosty and lustrous, a point in their favor. As is the case with 1921 Philadelphia Mint Morgan dollars, a certified 1921-D is apt to have a poor aesthetic appearance. I suggest these estimates: MS-60 to 62, 750,000 to 1,500,000; MS-63, 200,000 to 400,000; MS-64, 50,000 to 100,000; MS-65 or better (per current interpretations), 10,000 to 20,000.

1921-S $1 MS65 PCGS #7300

San Francisco Mint. Like the Philadelphia and Denver facilities, the San Francisco Mint was pressed into service to strike large quantities of new Morgan dollars in 1921. Coinage began on May 9, 1921. Numismatic Information Commentary: The 1921-S dollars, like the 1921-D coins, all have a Micro S mintmark. In B. Max Mehl's sale of the Alex J. Rosborough Collection, April 9, 1929, a 1921-S was catalogued as follows: "1921-S Microscopic S. AU. This specimen is one of the first 50 struck, secured by members of the Pacific Coast Numismatic Society." Apparently, such coins had no special surface quality apart from normal circulation strikes. Hoard coins: Dollars of this date and mint were scarce during the 1920s, for relatively few were released. This changed when quantities were paid out from storage at the San Francisco Mint at intervals from the 1930s through the 1950s. 1921-S dollars were little esteemed in their time, thus few original mint-sealed bags were saved. Not even casino operators and other silver dollar hoarders liked the 1921 Morgan from any of the three mints. Today, while individual coins are exceedingly common, bags of 1921-S are few and far between. The Redfield estate (1976) apparently had a partial bag. The Numismatist, December 1939, told of a recent release of 1921-S Morgan dollars: Morgan Type Dollar From San Francisco Mint: An interesting sight in the daily change around San Francisco recently has been the 1921 Morgan dollars in Mint or Uncirculated condition, some having just been released in that condition through the regular course of business. It is thought that possibly 10 to 15 million were melted under provisions of the 1942 Silver Act. In comparison to surviving 1921 Philadelphia Mint coins, 1921-S dollars are far more elusive than the respective mintage differences (approximately 2:1) would indicate. Circulated grades: In worn grades the 1921-S dollar is very common. An estimated two to four million survive. Mint State grades: The usually-seen Mint State specimen is very poorly struck, has abraded surfaces, and even if the lustre is rich (as it is on some), the high points of the design are apt to be dull. Fully struck, lustrous coins exist, are scarce, and when seen are apt to be bagmarked. Of the 1921-S, Wayne Miller noted the following: "This date is by far the worst of any Morgan dollar in terms of appearance. Most are a weak mushy strike." As is the case with other 1921 Morgan issues, grading interpretations for 1921-S are rather loose in comparison to earlier Morgan dollar dates. My population estimates are as follows: MS-60 to 62, 1,000,000 to 2,000,000; MS-63, 200,000 to 400,000; MS-64, 30,000 to 60,000; and MS-65 or better (per current interpretations), 2,000 to 4,000.

1921 $1 High Relief, Peace MS65 PCGS #7356

The 1921 Peace dollar is a very interesting and extremely important coin. It is, of course, the first year of issue for the Peace dollar series. Slightly over a million pieces were struck, a modest mintage for a silver dollar. But the 1921 was struck in very high relief, not unlike the 1907 High Relief $20 St. Gaudens. For many years the 1921 was not recognized as a separate type coin, although it clearly is such. The PCGS founders, along with the experts on the PCGS (and now PCGS CoinFacts) Board of Experts, confronted this lack of type coin recognition sometime shortly after the 1986 launch of PCGS. We all just start listing the 1921 as a separate type and the numismatic community soon followed suit. So the 1921 is now important as both the first year of issue (and one of the scarcer isuues) for the Peace dollar series, and as a very important one-year-only 20th century silver type coin. The 1921 is one of the scarcest Peace dollars in both circulated and mint state condition. In Gem condition it is scarce, but not quite as rare as some of the usually very weakly struck S Mints such as 1925-S and 1928-S which, because of strike, are very rare in Gem condition. Nevertheless, because of the high relief of the 1921, strike can definitely be a problem. The majority of mint state specimens show weakness in the central devices, i.e. Liberty's hair and the eagle's feathers. Well struck Gems are definitely the exception. Luster can vary on this issue. I have seen many that are white and quite frosty and I have also seen many that have a very satiny look. Toning is not uncommon and is light to heavy golden. Note that I am of the very strong opinion that any 1921 Peace dollar...indeed any Peace dollar...that has any rainbow colors (blue, red, green, etc) is absolutely artificially toned. While not very scientific, my approach to toning on coins is to remember the colors I saw in the 1960's and 1970's and if a new look appears, it's artificial to me. This is kind of an "old school" approach and I may be wrong, but unless you believe global warming has created new colors for coins, it just seems illogical to me that new colors would suddenly appear naturally on coins. Back to the 1921 Peace dollar...this is, in my opinion, one of the most important coins of the 20th century, and also one of the most beautiful.

1922 $1 MS65 PCGS #7357

The 1922 Peace Dollar has the highest mintage of any Silver Dollar, and it remains the most common date in the Peace Dollar series. Compared to the 1921 Peace Dollar, the 1922 has much lower and flatter relief details, but the strike quality is generally good. Luster ranges from a soft, creamy white to a hard, chrome-like surface. The vast quantity of the 1922 Peace Dollars graded by PCGS fall into the MS63 and MS64 levels. MS65 examples are not rare and the supply seems adequte to meet the demand from collectors. In MS66, the population drops off dramatically and, in MS67, the 1922 Peace Dollar is an extreme condition rarity. Record mintage: Beginning in 1922, Peace dollars were coined in fantastic quantities. At the Philadelphia Mint that year over 51 million were produced, an all-time record for a United States silver dollar. From this time onward, Peace dollars began to pile up in Mint vaults and other Treasury facilities. Hoard coins: Mint-sealed bags of 1,000 Mint State 1922 Peace dollars seem to have been released over a long period of time, with the result that this date has never been rare. Often, Eastern dealers searching for rare dates would find to their annoyance that shipments to their banks from the Federal Reserve would consist of $1,000 bags of this date. Particularly large quantities were released through banks in 1949 and 1950, but there was little call for them by numismatists. Bags were still readily available in 1953 and 1954, and wholesaled for about $75 to $125 above face value, if and when buyers could be found. Most often, such bags remained in bank vaults unwanted. Bags remained available through the rest of the decade and were still being distributed by the Treasury as late as March 1964. In later years, bags traded frequently. In 1982, Wayne Miller wrote that in one recent year he and his partner sold 40 bags (40,000 coins). Circulated grades: In worn grades of VF-20 and higher, 1922 Peace dollars are exceedingly common and are considered to be the most plentiful issue of the entire series. Mint State grades: In Mint State the 1922 is exceedingly common in all grades MS-60, MS-61, etc., through MS-65 and even beyond. Whether it is absolutely the most common Peace dollar in grades MS-60 through 63 will probably never be known. Most rarity information in print for Uncirculated Peace dollars is based upon population data of the certification services. However, such Peace dollar dates as 1922, 1923, 1924, and 1925 are so inexpensive in lower grades such as MS-60 through 63,that only a tiny fraction have ever been slabbed, as certification costs too much in proportion to the value of the coins. Certainly, in MS-63 either the 1922 or the 1923 is the most plentiful. The distinction is moot, for vast quantities exist of each. In MS-64 grade, the 1922 is common, but not as common as 1923 (the most common) and 1925; ditto for MS-65 grade.

1922-D $1 MS66 PCGS #7358

The 1922-D is the most common of all the Peace Dollars made at the Denver Mint. It's mintage of 15+ million is more than double that of the next closest (1923-D at 6+ million) and almost 12 times that of the lowest mintage Peace Dollar (1927-D). The vast majority of survivors are fairly equally distributed among the MS-63 and MS-64 grades. In MS-65, the 1922-D Peace Dollar becomes scarce. MS-66 examples become very scarce to rare and MS-67 examples are extremely rare. The strike characteristics of the 1922-D are not as strong as on the P-Mints, and that tends to be true for an D-Mint Peace Dollar. However, fully struck examples are available and are worth a premium over softly struck coins. According to a notice in the June 1934 issue of The Numismatist (p. 416), collectors could still purchase Uncirculated 1922-D Peace Dollars for "the face value of the coins and an amount sufficient to cover the mail charrges by first-class mail."

1922-S $1 MS64 PCGS #7359

1922 was the first year in which Peace Dollars were produced at the San Francisco mint. The mintage for this year was the second largest of all the Peace Dollars, following closely behind the 1923-S. Compared to Peace Dollars made a the Philadelphia and Denver mints in 1922, the S-Mint suffers from a lower level of quality, particularly in the area of strike. Many 1922-S Peace Dollars show weakness in the centers on both sides, translating into weak hair details over Liberty's ear and poorly defined feathers on the highest points of the eagle. Many 1922-S Peace Dollar suffer from bagmarks and surface abrasions received as the coins were transported in bags from the San Francisco Mint. As a result, the grade encountered most frequently on a 1922-S Peace Dollar is MS-63. Unlike the 1922-P and 1922-D, where the populations in MS-63 and MS-64 are nearly equal, the population of the MS-64 1922-S is over 20% less than in MS-63. In MS-65, the population drops off significantly, leaving barely enough coins to satisfy collector demand. In MS-66, the 1922-S Peace Dollar is a true condition-rarity and only a few coins have earned this grade. As of this writing (8/21/2015), no MS-67 or better 1922-S Peace Dollars have been certified by PCGS. Luster ranges from flat and dullish to frosty white. Coins with hard, chrome-like surfaces are rare. Finding a 1922-S Peace Dollar that combines problem-free surfaces, a full strike, and bold luster is a real challenge. According to a notice in the June 1934 issue of The Numismatist (p. 416), collectors could still purchase Uncirculated 1922-S Peace Dollars for "the face value of the coins and an amount sufficient to cover the mail charrges by first-class mail."

1978-D $1 MS66+ PCGS #7426

The 1978-D Eisenhower Dollar seems to be the scarcest coin in high uncirculated condition from all the Eisenhower Dollars that were struck at the Denver Mint. Possibly fewer than 1,000 examples have survived in MS66 condition. In MS67 condition it is almost non-existent with the exception of one lone example that has been graded MS67 with none being finer. Pop. 42/3 (1/18) Mintage: 33,012,890.

1849 G$1 Open Wreath MS61 PCGS #7502

The first Gold Dollars debuted in 1849, the result of a large influx of gold from California. The first versions are of the Open Wreath variety, showing the tips of the wreath distant from the 1 of the denomination. Later in the year, the Closed Wreath variety became the design of choice and was used until the end of the Type I series in 1854. The 1849 Open Wreath design includes both the With L and the No L varieties (these refer to the designer's initial which appears, or does not, on the truncation of the bust). Apart from the single No L variety, researcher John Dannreuther has identified three different With L varieties. PCGS alone has certified well over 1,000 1849 Open Wreath Gold Dollars, allowing collectors to choose from large numbers of MS62 to MS64 examples. Even Gems are relatively common, but MS67 and better examples are exceedingly rare. For mind-blowing quality, there's always the PCGS MS69 -- one of the finest Gold Dollars of any date.

1906 $2.50 MS66 PCGS #7858

A common date. Generally available in uncirculated condition or proof.

1892 $5 MS63 PCGS #8379

The 1892 is common in all grades including choice uncirculated.

1893 $10 MS63 PCGS #8725

The 1893 $10 has the dubious distinction of having the largest PCGS-certified population of any date in the entire 10 Liberty series (although the 1894 $10 is almost as plentiful). This was one of the dates exported in large quantities to European central banks by the United States government decades ago. Dealers began re-importing them back into America beginning in the late 1970's and 1980s, and the supply has been seemingly inexhaustible. One might expect a large number of Gems from such a large population, but such is not the case. Rather, the overall quality of this date is generally poor, with the vast majority of survivors appearing in MS61 and MS62, suggesting excessive handling and movement of the bags in which the coins were stored. Thus, out of a population of over 17,000 PCGS-certified Mint State examples, only four have earned the MS65 grade

1893-S $20 MS63 PCGS #9024

The 1893-S is a moderately scarce date, comparable overall to the 1879-S, 1882-S, 1885-S, 1888-S, 1892-S, 1901-S and 1905-S. Uncs are available more than any other individual grade but choice and gem quality specimens are very scarce, especially gems. I have seen a few really superb examples of this date, the finest being the nearly perfect coin that is in a prominent Dallas bank collection.

2001-D 25C Vermont MS68 PCGS #14001

Pop. 120/0 (11/17) Mintage: 459,404,000.

2003-D 25C Illinois MS68 PCGS #14015

Pop. 17/0. (3/18). Mintage: 237,400,000.

2003-D 25C Missouri MS68 PCGS #14021

The 2003-D Missouri State Quarter was the 24th coin design issued in the State Quarters Program. The coin was officially released on August 04, 2003. Examples came well struck and finding one in circulation should be fairly easy since they were struck by the hundreds of millions. Only in MS68 condition or higher do they appear to be scarce. Population: 51/0 (6/14) Mintage: 228,200,000.

2003-P 25C Arkansas MS68 PCGS #14022

The 2003 Arkansas Quarter design was the twenty fifth design issued in the State Quarters program. There were 9,320 different designs submitted for review and finally, the Dortha Scott design was chosen. The obverse of the coin still had the same George Washington modern design used since 1999. The reverse had the inscriptions "Arkansas 1836, 2003" and "E Pluribus Unum." The design itself had a large diamond in the middle of the scene. Underneath the diamond is a mallard flying above some trees and over a lake. Most 2003-P Arkansas Quarters came well struck. Only in MS67 condition or higher are they scarce. In MS68 condition or higher they are very difficult to find and expect to pay a significant premium in this condition or higher. Pop. 18/0 (4/18) Mintage: 228,000,000.

2003-D 25C Arkansas MS68 PCGS #14023

Pop. 92/0 (10/10) Mintage: 229,800,000. The Denver Mint struck over 229 million Arkansas Quarters, making them very common in most grades. Coins up to MS67 condition can easily be obtained. In MS68 and higher, they become much more challenging to find.

1817 1C Newcomb 13 MS64BN PCGS #36586

The 1817 Newcomb 13 Large Cent is a common variety in all grades including Mint State. Large Cent expert, John Wright, estimates that there may be as many as "hundreds" of Mint State examples in existence today. Based on that expansive population, Wright believes this variety may have been included in the Randall Hoard, famous as the source of many Uncirculated Middle Date Large Cents. Wright calls this variety the "Lazy C" because the C of CENT is rotated far to the right relative to the E. Early states of this variety have full denticles and sharp stars. As the dies wore, the denticles become mushy and indistinct, and the outer points of the stars began to stretch out toward the border. Most Mint State examples are Brown, with perhaps a small amount of original red color. Red and Brown examples are decidedly scarce and there are no full Red examples known. The finest example is the PCGS MS66BN from the D. Brent Pogue Collection.

2006-S 25C Nevada PR70DCAM PCGS #39112

Pop. 622/0 (12/17) Mintage: 2,882,428.

2006-S 25C Nevada Silver PR70DCAM PCGS #39115

Pop. 935/0 (12/17) Mintage: 1,585,008.

2006-S 25C Nebraska PR70DCAM PCGS #39118

Pop. 475/0 (12/17) Mintage: 2,882,428.

2006-S 25C Nebraska Silver PR70DCAM PCGS #39121

Pop. 1,075/0 (12/17) Mintage: 1,585,008.

2006-S 25C Colorado PR70DCAM PCGS #39124

Pop. 560/0 (12/17) Mintage: 2,882,428.

2006-S 25C Colorado Silver PR70DCAM PCGS #39127

Pop. 1,160 (12/17) Mintage: 1,585,008.

2006-S 25C North Dakota PR70DCAM PCGS #39130

Pop. 432/0 (12/17) Mintage: 2,882,428.

2006-S 25C North Dakota Silver PR70DCAM PCGS #39133

Pop. 1,052/0 (12/17) Mintage: 1,585,008.

2006-S 25C South Dakota PR70DCAM PCGS #39136

Pop. 639/0 (12/17) Mintage: 2,882,428.

2006-S 25C South Dakota Silver PR70DCAM PCGS #39139

Pop. 1,180/0 (12/17) Mintage: 1,585,008.

1800 $1 BB-181 VF25 PCGS #40067

OBVERSE 1: 180 close in date. TY too far apart. The 1 in date barely misses touching the hair. Slight elevation in field between lowest left stat and' hair due to depression in die. Die flaws near inside point of star 11 and also at lower outside of same star. Star 8 near Y, and star 13 near bust, the two about equidistant. On the left, stars 3 and 4 are closer together than are any others. Point of star 11 closest to border has its end bent upward, a most unusual characteristic. Obverse die. used to strike 1800 BB-181 only. REVERSE A: Leaf touches lower right corner of serif of I in AMERICA (compare to reverse of BB-'183, which touches bottom of I at a different point). Point of star touches point of lower part of eagle's beak. A in AMERICA touches only 3rd feather. First T in STATES is double-punched. AME joined at lower part. A over clouds 2 and 3. Tip of arrowhead under center of U in UNITED. Reverse die used to strike 1800 BB-181 (earlier use) and BB-182 (later use).

1802 $1 BB-241, Narrow Date VF35 PCGS #40088

Imagine - not one, but TWO Gem MS-65 examples back-to-back! That's the unlikely pleasure I experienced in the PCGS grading room in June, 2010. One example was beautifully toned, the other predominantly white; both were original. Despite my affinity for toning, I thought the whiter example, overall, to be a bit superior. Both were fully struck. Thank you to whomever submitted this remarkable pair!

1946-D 5C MS66FS PCGS #84029

Pop. 300/14 (4/14) Mintage: 45,292,200.

1948-D 5C MS66FS PCGS #84035

Mintage: 44,734,000.

1975 5C MS66FS PCGS #84094

Pop. 31/1 (3/13) Mintage: 181,772,000.

1975-D 5C MS66FS PCGS #84095

Pop. 27/0 (8/13) Mintage: 401,875,300.

1985-P 5C MS66FS PCGS #84114

The 1985-P Jefferson Nickel is fairly common in most grades. Only in MS65 Full Steps condition does it become scarce. In MS66 with Full Steps it is very tough to locate and the highest grade assigned by PCGS for this issue. Pop. 45/0 (6/14) Mintage: 647,114,962.

1985-D 5C MS66FS PCGS #84115

Jefferson Nickels from 1985 from the Denver Mint are not rare or scarce by any means, as they were struck in the hundreds of millions. However, in high Uncirculated grades this date is scarce in MS66 and higher. With the Full Steps designation, it is even scarcer. There are no more than a few hundred examples that would probably grade MS66 with Full Steps but more than likely, there may even be less than 100 examples total. In MS67 with or without Full Steps this coin is almost unheard of. Any example that looks MS67 or higher is definitely a coin worth keeping and worth grading, as it would be one of the nicest examples out there. Pop. 44/1 (12/10) Mintage: 459,747,446.

2001-P 5C MS67FS PCGS #84148

Pop. 252/5 (6/14) Mintage: 675,704,000.

2001-D 5C MS67FS PCGS #84149

Pop. 43/1 (6/14) Mintage: 627,680,000.

1946 10C MS67FB PCGS #85082

Pop. 41/5 (6/14) Mintage: 255,250,000.

1946-S 10C MS67FB PCGS #85084

Pop. 139/13 (6/14) Mintage: 27,900,000.

1975 10C MS67FB PCGS #85147

Pop. 4/0 (5/18) Mintage: 585,673,900.

1985-P 10C MS67FB PCGS #85168

Pop. 29/2 (3/16) Mintage: 705,200,962.

1985-D 10C MS67FB PCGS #85169

Pop. 55/3 (3/15) Mintage: 587,979,970.

2001-P 10C MS68FB PCGS #85201

Pop. 168/0 (11/17) Mintage: 1,369,590,000.

2003-P 10C MS68FB PCGS #85205

The 2003-P Roosevelt Dime is very common overall. In circulated grades up to MS66 it is readily available. In MS67 and MS68 it is scarcer. Anything grading higher than MS68 is very hard to find especially with the Full Bands designation. Pop. 139/0 (10/10) Mintage: 1,085,500,000.

2003-D 10C MS68FB PCGS #85206

The 2003-D Roosevelt Dime can be easily obtained as the U.S. Mint struck close to 1 billion examples. Only in MS68 do they appear to be scarce. Anything grading higher than MS68 is considered rare. Pop. 177/0 (10/10) Mintage: 986,500,000.

1948-D 50C MS66FBL PCGS #86652

The 1948-D Franklin Half is the first coin struck at the Denver Mint for this series. It's mintage is just over 4 million so not a rare date but also not a common date. It is only common in circulated grades and up to MS62 grade more or less. Examples in MS63 and even MS64 can still be found in rolls or mint sets. Examples in MS65 have probably already been pulled from rolls. In MS66 condition they are very scarce with several hundred still available at a premium. In MS67 condition they are truly scarce with less than dozen known and none being finer. Pop. 177/9 (6/14) Mintage: 4,028,600.

1953-D 50C MS66FBL PCGS #86665

Pop. (121/8) (6/14). CAC

1975-S 1C PR69DCAM PCGS #93446

The 1975-S Proof Lincoln Cent came well struck for the most part. Most examples appear to be in PR67 condition or higher. Examples up to PR69 Deep Cameo are easy to locate. Anything higher is very scarce to rare. Pop. 471/0 (6/14).

1985-S 1C PR70DCAM PCGS #93482

Pop. 77/0 (6/14) Mintage: 3,010,497.

2001-S 1C PR70DCAM PCGS #93539

Pop. 317/0 (6/14) Mintage: 2,294,083.

2003-S 1C PR70DCAM PCGS #93545

Pop. 257/0 (6/14) Mintage: 3.298.439.

2005-S 1C PR70DCAM PCGS #93554

Pop. 333/0 (6/14) Mintage: 3,344,679.

2006-S 1C PR70DCAM PCGS #93559

The 2006-S Proof Lincoln Cent is very common and examples are very inexpensive up to about PR69 Deep Cameo condition. Only PR70 Deep Cameo coins of this date command a very slight premium over PR69DC prices. Pop. 421/0 (6/14) Mintage: 3,054,436.

1975-S 5C PR70DCAM PCGS #94208

Pop. 7/0 (1/15) Mintage: 2,845,450.

1978-S 5C PR70DCAM PCGS #94211

The 1978-S Proof Jefferson Nickel is easy to obtain in grades up to PR69 deep cameo. In perfect PR70 deep cameo condition they are scarcer but many examples exist and most serious Jefferson Nickel collectors acan afford an example in this grade. Pop. 75/0 (6/14) Mintage: 3,127,781.

1979-S 5C Type 1 PR70DCAM PCGS #94212

In 1979 the U.S. Mint struck the 1979-S Proof Jefferson Nickel with two different mint marks. The Type 1 mint mark is less clear and is also referred to as a filled s mint mark. The Type 2 1979-S Proof Jefferson Nickel has a clearer s mint mark and is referred to as a clear s mint mark. Both varieties are very collectible and very popular with Proof Jefferson Nickel collectors. Pop. 56/0 (6/14) Mintage: 3,677,175.

1979-S 5C Type 2 PR70DCAM PCGS #94213

Pop. 125/0 (4/18) Mintage: 3,677,175.

1985-S 5C PR70DCAM PCGS #94220

The 1985-S Proof Jefferson Nickel can be located very easily in grades up to PR69 Deep Cameo. Examples are very affordable up to PR69 Deep Cameo. Only in PR70 Deep Cameo are they scarce and command a premium. Pop. 48/0 (6/14) Mintage: 3,362,821.

2001-S 5C PR70DCAM PCGS #94237

The 2001-S Proof Jefferson Nickel is considered fairly common since more than enough proof coins were struck to meet the collectors demands. Most examples come well struck and examples up to PR69 and PR70 deep cameo are fairly affordable and easy to find. Pop. 451/0 (6/14) Mintage: 2,294,043.

2003-S 5C PR70DCAM PCGS #94239

Pop. 631/0 (6/14).

2005-S 5C Bison PR70DCAM PCGS #94242

Pop. 915/0 (6/14) Mintage: 3,344,679.

2005-S 5C Western Waters PR70DCAM PCGS #94243

Pop. 822/0 (6/14) Mintage: 3,344,679.

2006-S 5C Monticello PR70DCAM PCGS #94246

The circulation strike 2006 Jefferson Nickels were released by the U.S. Mint on January 12, 2006. However, the Proof coins were issued at different times since they came in different Proof Sets from the U.S. Mint. The 2006 Jefferson Nickel is the first coin to have a Presidents portrait facing forward. In the past, the Presidents depictions have been displayed on a profiled view. Most 2006-S Proof Jefferson Nickels came in Proof Sets ranging from PR68-PR69 Deep Cameo quality. Perfect PR70 Deep Cameo examples were a little more difficult to find but enough examples were stuck that almost anyone can afford one very inexpensively in graded PR70 Deep Cameo condition. Pop. 460/0 (6/14) Mintage: 3,054,436.

2005-P 10C Satin Finish SP69FB PCGS #95211

In 2005 the U.S. Mint introduced a new Set of coins which had a special finish. These new coins were referred to as Satin Finish coins and came in Special Mint Sets. The coins did not go into circulation and were only sold to collectors by the U.S. Mint. The coins were better stuck than circulation strike coins. The 2005-P Satin Finish Roosevelt Dime was no exception and was struck really well. Most examples range from MS67 to MS69 condition. Pop. 218/0 (11/17).

2005-D 10C Satin Finish SP69FB PCGS #95212

Pop. 37/0 (11/17).

1975-S 10C PR70DCAM PCGS #95253

The 1975-S Proof Roosevelt Dime is fairly easy to obtain, as the San Francisco Mint struck more than enough examples to meet the collectors demand. Examples up to PR69 Deep Cameo condition are the norm, only in PR70 Deep Cameo are they much scarcer. But even then, examples in PR70 Deep Cameo are fairly affordable, that most serious collectors can easily obtain one. Pop. 46/0 (6/14). Keep an eye out for the 1975 Proof No S mint mark Roosevelt Dime. As this variety is extremely rare. One example sold for over $300,000 in 2011.

1978-S 10C PR70DCAM PCGS #95257

Pop. 559/0 (6/14).

1979-S 10C Type 1 PR70DCAM PCGS #95258

Pop. 551/0 (6/14) Mintage: 3,677,175.

1985-S 10C PR70DCAM PCGS #95267

Pop. 238/0 (6/14) Mintage: 3,362,821.

2001-S 10C PR70DCAM PCGS #95292

Pop. 450/0 (6/14) Mintage: 2,294,043.

2001-S 10C Silver PR70DCAM PCGS #95293

Pop. 549/0 (6/14) Mintage: 889,697.

2003-S 10C PR70DCAM PCGS #95302

Pop. 476/0 (6/14) Mintage: 2,172,684.

2003-S 10C Silver PR70DCAM PCGS #95307

Pop. 635/0 (6/14) Mintage: 1,125,755.

2005-S 10C PR70DCAM PCGS #95310

2005-S 10C PR70DC Pop. (476/0) (7/14).

2005-S 10C Silver PR70DCAM PCGS #95311

2005-S 10C Silver PR70DC Pop. (770/0) (7/14).

2006-S 10C PR70DCAM PCGS #95314

Pop. 892/0 (12/17) Mintage" 2,000,428.

2006-S 10C Silver PR70DCAM PCGS #95317

Pop. 864/0 (12/17) Mintage: 1,054,008.

1978-S 25C PR70DCAM PCGS #96012

Most 1978-S Proof Washington Quarters comes well struck. Examples up to about PR69 Deep Cameo are very common. Only in perfect PR70 Deep Cameo condition do they become somewhat scarce. But still, examples in PR70 Deep Cameo can be purchased very inexpensively as there are hundreds if not thousands of coins remaining in this condition. Pop. 300/0 (6/14).

1979-S 25C Type 1 PR70DCAM PCGS #96013

In 1979 the U.S. Mint used two different mint marks to strike Proof coins, including the Washington quarters. The Type 1 Washington quarter will have a filled S mint mark, while the Type 2 will have a clear S mint mark. Both Quarters appear to be fairly common with the Type 1 or the Type 2 mint mark. Pop. 251/0 (6/14) Mintage: 3,677,175.

1979-S 25C Type 2 PR70DCAM PCGS #96014

In 1979 the U.S. Mint struck Proof Washington Quarters with two different mint marks. The first or Type 1 mint mark looks filled or not as clear, so it is referred to as the filled s mint mark. The Type 2 mint mark is much clearer, therefore, it is refrred to as the clear S mint mark. Both mint marks are easy to dustinguish. Pop. 397/0 (4/18) Mintage: 3,677,175.

1985-S 25C PR70DCAM PCGS #96021

The 1985-S Proof Washington Quarter came well struck. Most examples range from about PR67-PR69 deep cameo condition. In perfect PR70 deep cameo condition they are scarcer but most collectors should be able to afford one easily. Pop. 169/0 (6/14) Mintage: 3,362,821.

2006-P 50C Satin Finish SP69 PCGS #96790

Pop. 109/0 (11/17).

2006-D 50C Satin Finish SP69 PCGS #96791

Pop. 33/0 (4/18).

1978-S 50C PR70DCAM PCGS #96816

Pop. 421/0 (6/14) Mintage: 3,127,781.

1979-S 50C Type 1 PR70DCAM PCGS #96818

Pop. 342/0 (6/14) Mintage: 3,677,175.

1979-S 50C Type 2 PR70DCAM PCGS #96819

Pop. 437/0 (4/18) Mintage: 3,677,175

1985-S 50C PR70DCAM PCGS #96826

Pop. 230/0 (6/14) Mintage: 3,362,662.

2001-S 50C PR70DCAM PCGS #96914

Pop. 258/0 (6/14) Mintage: 2,294,043.

2001-S 50C Silver PR70DCAM PCGS #96915

Cody Parker Jackson (2001-): Born 30 December Carson City, Nevada. Pop. 324/0 (6/14) Mintage: 889,697.

2003-S 50C PR70DCAM PCGS #96918

Pop. 312/0 97/14).

2003-S 50C Silver PR70DCAM PCGS #96919

Pop. 344/0 (7/14) Mintage:

2006-S 50C PR70DCAM PCGS #96976

Pop. 356/0 (12/17).

2006-S 50C Silver PR70DCAM PCGS #96977

Pop. 637/0 (12/17).

1978-S $1 PR70DCAM PCGS #97438

Most 1978-S Proof Eisenhower Dollars comes well struck. Examples up to about PR69 Deep Cameo are very common. Only in perfect PR70 Deep Cameo condition do they become somewhat scarce. But still, examples in PR70 Deep Cameo can be purchased very inexpensively as there are hundreds if not thousands of coins remaining in this condition. Pop. 26/0 (1/15).

1979-S SBA$1 Type 1 PR70DCAM PCGS #99589

All proof Susan B. Anthony dollars are Deep Cameo. The few non-Deep Cameos on the PCGS Population Report are holdovers from the time before PCGS began designating "DCAM" on Susan B. Anthony dollars. Pop. 710/0 (6/14) Mintage: 3,677,175.

1979-S SBA$1 Type 2 PR70DCAM PCGS #99590

All proof Susan B. Anthony dollars are Deep Cameo. The few non-Deep Cameos on the PCGS Population Report are holdovers from the time before PCGS began designating "DCAM" on Susan B. Anthony dollars. Pop. 494/0 (4/18) mintage: 3,677,175.

2001-S SAC$1 PR70DCAM PCGS #99599

The 2001-S Proof Sacagawea Dollar is very common in the series. Its mintage is over 3.1 million. There are numerous other dates in the series that have mintages under 3 million. A few dates in the Proof Sacagawea Dollars also have mintages under 1 million. Therefore, the 2001-S Proof Sacagawea Dollar can easily be obtained for a very small premium. Most examples appear to be in about PR68-PR769 Deep Cameo condition. Perfect PR70 Deep Cameo examples are a lot more difficult to find but enough examples exist that prices remain affordable to most collectors. Pop. (596/0) (6/14) Mintage: 3,184,606.

2008-S 50C Bald Eagle PR70DCAM PCGS #394417

The 2008-S Proof Half Dollar Bald Eagle Commemorative coins were officially released on January 15, 2008 at 12:00 p.m. (ET). The coins were issued to celebrate their removal from the endangered species list, after remaining in the endangered species list for 35 years. This was also the first commemorative half dollar produced by the U.S. Mint since 2003. Obverse: The Obverse of the coin depicts a pair of baby eaglets just several days old on top of a nest. In front of the eaglets lays an un-hatched egg. There are several large leaves and branches keeping the eaglets warm and safe . Above the eaglets is the motto, IN GOD WE TRUST. Above the motto is the word, LIBERTY with a star to the right, and to the right of the star, it displays the date 2008 or the year in which the coins were issued.

2008-S $1 James Monroe First Strike PR70DCAM PCGS #394880

Carlie Mary Crossman (2008- ), Zachary Evan Jackson (2008-)

2008-S 1C PR70DCAM PCGS #394913

Pop. 348/0 (6/14) Mintage: 2,000,000.

2008-S 5C PR70DCAM PCGS #394924

Pop. 327/0 (6/14) Mintage: 2,169,561.

2009-S 25C Puerto Rico PR70DCAM PCGS #406568

The Puerto Rico Quarter was the second design released in the District of Columbia and U.S. Territories Quarter Program. Mint Issue Price: The Proof District of Columbia and U.S. Territories Quarters were sold in a Proof set consisting of all six different 2009 Proof Clad Quarters. The sets were first offered on the U.S. Mint web site on January 05, 2009 at Noon (E.T.). Each Clad Proof Set was priced at $14.95 each. The Mint also offered Silver District of Columbia and U.S. Territories Quarters in a separate set.

2010-S $1 Native American PR70DCAM PCGS #416238

The 2010-S Proof Sacagawea Dollars came in Proof Sets from the year and were struck in great quality. Most examples ranged from about PR67-PR69 Deep Cameo condition. Fewer examples exist in perfect PCGS PR70 Deep Cameo condition. However any example in any grade should not be difficult to find since the Mint produced them in large quantities and most examples came in really nice quality . Pop. 760/0 (12/17).

2010-S 1C Shield PR70DCAM PCGS #416682

The 2010 Proof Shield Lincoln cents were issued in a 2010 (14 Coin) Proof Set. The 2010 cent replaced the old Memorial reverse and now has a new Shield reverse design. 2010 (14 Coin) Proof Set: The 2010 (14 Coin) Proof Set was first sold by the U.S. Mint on July 22, 2010 at 12:00 Noon (ET). Each set had a price of $31.95 each. Each set contained a Lincoln cent, Jefferson Nickel, Roosevelt Dime, Kennedy Half Dollar, Native American Half Dollar, the five America the Beautiful Quarters and four Presidential Dollars all in Proof format and from the year 2010. Pop. 266/0 (6/14) Mintage: 1,689,216.

2010-S 5C PR70DCAM PCGS #418789

The 2010-S Proof Jefferson Nickel carried the same design issued from 2006 to date. The 2010 Proof Jefferson Nickels were issued in a 2010 (14 Coin) Proof Set. 2010 (14 Coin) Proof Set: The 2010 Proof Set was first sold by the U.S. Mint on July 22, 2010 at 12:00 Noon (ET). Each set had a price of $31.95 each. Each set contained a Lincoln cent, Jefferson Nickel, Roosevelt Dime, Kennedy Half Dollar, Native American Half Dollar, the five America the Beautiful Quarters and four Presidential Dollars all Proof and from the year 2010. All Proof coins in the set are struck on specially prepared blanks which are polished and cleaned prior to striking. The blanks are then struck by polished dies at least twice to produce a sharp relief. Pop. 379/0 (6/14) Mintage: 1,689,364.

2010-S 10C PR70DCAM PCGS #418802

The 2010-S Proof Roosevelt Dime portrays the same design issued from 1946 to date. The 2010 Proof Roosevelt Dimes were issued in a 2010 (14 Coin) Proof Set. 2010 (14 Coin) Proof Set: The 2010 Proof Set was first sold by the U.S. Mint on July 22, 2010 at 12:00 Noon (ET). Each set had a price of $31.95 each. Each set contained a Lincoln cent, Jefferson Nickel, Roosevelt Dime, Kennedy Half Dollar, Native American Half Dollar, the five America the Beautiful Quarters and four Presidential Dollars all Proof and from the year 2010. All Proof coins in the set are struck on specially prepared blanks which are polished and cleaned prior to striking. The blanks are then struck by polished dies at least twice to produce a sharp relief. Pop. 716/0 (12/17) Mintage: 1,103,950.

2010-S 10C Silver PR70DCAM PCGS #418806

The 2010-S Silver Proof Roosevelt Dime was only issued in the 2010 Silver Proof Set. 2010 Silver Proof Set- The 2010 Silver Proof Set went on sale on the U.S. mint web site on August 26, 2010. Each set had an example of each circulating coin but in a proof format and had a total of 14 coins in the set. The Roosevelt Dime, the 5 different America the Beautiful Quarters and the Kennedy Halves were composed of 90% silver. All other coins in the set were composed of the same metal composition as before. Issue Price: The 2010 Silver Proof Set had a price of 56.95 each if purchased directly from the U.S. Mint. Pop. 1,201/0 (12/17) Mintage: 585,414.

2010-P 10C Satin Finish SP69FB PCGS #418808

The 2010-P Satin Finish Roosevelt Dimes were sold to the public by the U.S. Mint in a 28 Piece Uncirculated Coin Set. Satin Finish: A Satin Finish coin is a coin which is not released into circulation by the United States Mint. Instead, the coins are sold in Mint Sets only. All Satin Finish coins are struck on special sandblasted planchets, also known as burnished planchets. The coins are then struck under higher pressure than circulation strike coins. Satin Finish coins are also handled with lots of care throughout the entire production process and finally inserted in to United States Mint Sets. 2010 Uncirculated 28 - Piece Coin Set: The 2010 Uncirculated 28 Coin Mint Set was first offered by the Mint on July, 15, 2010. The set included eight Satin Finish 2010 Philadelphia and Denver Presidential Dollar coins, from all four different 2010 Presidential Dollar designs. The set also included the 2010 Native American Dollars, Kennedy Half Dollars, Five different America the Beautiful Quarters, Roosevelt Dimes, Jefferson Nickels and Lincoln cents. All Mint Sets contained an example from the Philadelphia and Denver Mints. Each 2010 Uncirculated 28 Coin Mint Set was priced at $31.95 directly from the U.S. Mint. Worth mentioning, is that the 2010 set increased in price compared to the 2009 Uncirculated Mint Set. The 2009 Set was priced $27.95 each directly from the U.S. Mint and it contained 36 coins rather than 28 coins. Pop. 21/0 (10/10).

2010-D 10C Satin Finish SP69FB PCGS #418811

The 2010-D Satin Finish Roosevelt Dimes were sold to the public by the U.S. Mint in a 28 Piece Uncirculated Coin Set: Satin Finish: A Satin Finish coin is a coin which is not released into circulation by the United States Mint. Instead, the coins are sold in Mint Sets only. All Satin Finish coins are struck on special sandblasted planchets, also known as burnished planchets. The coins are then struck under higher pressure than circulation strike coins. Satin Finish coins are also handled with lots of care throughout the entire production process and finally inserted in to United States Mint Sets. 2010 Uncirculated 28 - Piece Coin Set: The 2010 Uncirculated 28 Coin Mint Set was first offered by the Mint on July, 15, 2010. The set included eight Satin Finish 2010 Philadelphia and Denver Presidential Dollar coins, from all four different 2010 Presidential Dollar designs. The set also included the 2010 Native American Dollars, Kennedy Half Dollars, Five different America the Beautiful Quarters, Roosevelt Dimes, Jefferson Nickels and Lincoln cents. All Mint Sets contained an example from the Philadelphia and Denver Mints. Each 2010 Uncirculated 28 Coin Mint Set was priced at $31.95 directly from the U.S. Mint. Worth mentioning, is that the 2010 set increased in price compared to the 2009 Uncirculated Mint Set. The 2009 Set was priced $27.95 each directly from the U.S. Mint and it contained 36 coins rather than 28 coins. Pop. 61/0 (10/10).

2010-S 25C Hot Springs NP PR70DCAM PCGS #418825

The 2010-S Proof Hot Springs Quarter is the first design issued in the America the Beautiful Quarters Program. The 2010-S Proof Hot Springs Quarter was initially sold in a 2010 America the Beautiful Quarters (5 Piece) Proof Set. Later in the year, it was also issued in a separate 2010 (14 Coin) Proof Set. (Read about the different Proof Sets below...). 2010 America the Beautiful (5 Coin) Proof Set: The 2010 (5 Coin) Proof Set was first sold by the U.S. Mint on May 13, 2010 at 12:00 Noon (ET). Each set had a price of $14.95 each. Each set contained all five different designs of the 2010 America the Beautiful Quarters. 2010 (14 Coin) Proof Set: The 2010 Proof Set was first sold by the U.S. Mint on July 22, 2010 at 12:00 Noon (ET). Each set had a price of $31.95 each. Each set contained a Lincoln cent, Jefferson Nickel, Roosevelt Dime, Kennedy Half Dollar, Native American Half Dollar, the five America the Beautiful Quarters and four Presidential Dollars all Proof and from the year 2010. All Proof coins in the set were struck on specially prepared blanks which are polished and cleaned prior to striking. This gives the coins strong mirror like surfaces and a deep cameo appearance. The blanks were then struck by polished dies at least twice to produce a sharp relief. Pop. 709/0 (12/17).

2010-S 25C Hot Springs NP - Silver PR70DCAM PCGS #418828

The 2010-S Proof Hot Springs Silver Quarter is the first design issued in the America the Beautiful Quarters Program. The 2010-S Proof Hot Springs Silver Quarter was only issued in the 2010 Silver Proof Set. 2010 Silver Proof Set: The 2010 Silver Proof Set went on sale on the U.S. Mint web site on August 26, 2010. Each set had an example of each circulating coin but in a proof format and it had a total of 14 coins in the set. The Roosevelt Dime, the 5 different America the Beautiful Quarters and the Kennedy Half were composed of 90% silver. All other coins in the set were composed of the same metal composition as before. Issue Price: The 2010 Silver Proof Set had a price of 56.95 each if purchased directly from the U.S. Mint. Overview: The Hot Springs National Park is located in Arkansas and it was established as a historical site on April 20, 1832. It was established as a historical site in order to conserve the water from its 47 springs that emerge water from Hot Springs Mountain. The water was primarily used to drink and for therapy purposes. Obverse: The Obverse of the coin displays the same Washington bust design used on all State Quarters to date. Reverse: The reverse of the Hot Springs Quarter illustrates the façade of the Hot Springs National Park Headquarters with a thermal fountain in the foreground. The reverse also has the inscriptions, Hot Springs, Arkansas, 2010 and E PLURIBUS UNUM. The Hot Springs Headquarters was completed in 1936. Pop. 1,190/0 (12/17).

2010-S 25C Yellowstone NP PR70DCAM PCGS #418831

The 2010-S Proof Yellowstone Quarter is the second design issued in the America the Beautiful Quarters Program. The 2010-S Proof Yellowstone Quarter was initially sold in a 2010 America the Beautiful Quarters (5 Piece) Proof Set. Later in the year, it was also issued in a separate 2010 (14 Coin) Proof Set. (Read about the different Proof Sets below...) 2010 America the Beautiful (5 Coin) Proof Set: The 2010 (5 Coin) Proof Set was first sold by the U.S. Mint on May 13, 2010 at 12:00 Noon (ET). Each set had a price of $14.95 each. Each set contained all five different designs of the 2010 America the Beautiful Quarters. 2010 (14 Coin) Proof Set: The 2010 Proof Set was first sold by the U.S. Mint on July 22, 2010 at 12:00 Noon (ET). Each set had a price of $31.95 each. Each set contained a Lincoln cent, Jefferson Nickel, Roosevelt Dime, Kennedy Half Dollar, Native American Half Dollar, the five America the Beautiful Quarters and four Presidential Dollars all Proof and from the year 2010. All Proof coins in the set were struck on specially prepared blanks which are polished and cleaned prior to striking. This gives the coins strong mirror like surfaces and a deep cameo appearance. The blanks were then struck by polished dies at least twice to produce a sharp relief. Pop. 716/0 (12/17).

2010-S 25C Yellowstone NP - Silver PR70DCAM PCGS #418834

The 2010-S Proof Yellowstone National Park Silver Quarter is the second design issued in the America the Beautiful Quarters Program. The 2010-S Proof Yellowstone National Park Silver Quarter was only issued in the 2010 America the beautiful 5 Piece Silver Proof Set and the 2010 Silver 14 Piece Proof Set. 2010 America the Beautiful Quarters Silver Proof Set: The America the Beautiful Quarters Silver 5 Piece Proof Set went on sale at the U.S. Mint on May 27, 2010. Each set contained 5 different America the Beautiful Quarter designs. All 5 quarters in the set were composed of 90% silver. Issue Price: The America the Beautiful Quarters 5 Piece Proof set was priced at $32.95 for each set, if purchased directly from the U.S. Mint. 2010 Silver Proof Set: The 2010 Silver Proof Set went on sale on the U.S. Mint web site on August 26, 2010. Each set had an example of each circulating coin but in a proof format and it had a total of 14 coins in the set. The Roosevelt Dime, the 5 different America the Beautiful Quarters and the Kennedy Half were composed of 90% silver. All other coins in the set were composed of the same metal composition as before. Issue Price: The 2010 Silver Proof Set had a price of 56.95 each if purchased directly from the U.S. Mint. Obverse: The obverse of the coin features the same George Washington bust design used on all Quarters from 1999 to date. Reverse: The reverse of the coin features a mature full bison with the Old Faithful geyser and the Yellowstone Mountains in the background. The inscriptions YELOWSTONE, WYOMING, 2010, and E PLRURIBUS UNUM, are located in a circular border in between the edge and design of the coin. Yellowstone National Park: The Yellowstone National Park is located in Wyoming. The park was established as a National site on March 01, 1872. The Yellowstone National Park has some of the world’s most incredible geysers and is also home to a lot of wildlife animals like grizzly bears, wolves, bison and elk. Program Overview: The National Park Quarters Program began in 2010. It will honor a total of 56 National Parks and National Sites throughout the United States and the U.S. Territories. Five different reverse designs will be released each year in the order in which the site was established as a historic national site. Public Law: Public Law 110-456. Pop. 1,311/0 (12/17).

2010-S 25C Yosemite NP PR70DCAM PCGS #418837

The 2010-S Proof Yosemite Quarter is the third design issued in the America the Beautiful Quarters Program. The 2010-S Proof Yosemite Quarter was initially sold in a 2010 America the Beautiful Quarters (5 Piece) Proof Set. Later in the year, it was also issued in a separate 2010 (14 Coin) Proof Set. (Read about the different Proof Sets below...). 2010 America the Beautiful (5 Coin) Proof Set: The 2010 (5 Coin) Proof Set was first sold by the U.S. Mint on May 13, 2010 at 12:00 Noon (ET). Each set had a price of $14.95 each. Each set contained all five different designs of the 2010 America the Beautiful Quarters. 2010 (14 Coin) Proof Set: The 2010 Proof Set was first sold by the U.S. Mint on July 22, 2010 at 12:00 Noon (ET). Each set had a price of $31.95 each. Each set contained a Lincoln cent, Jefferson Nickel, Roosevelt Dime, Kennedy Half Dollar, Native American Half Dollar, the five America the Beautiful Quarters and four Presidential Dollars all Proof and from the year 2010. All Proof coins in the set were struck on specially prepared blanks which are polished and cleaned prior to striking. This gives the coins strong mirror like surfaces and a deep cameo appearance. The blanks were then struck by polished dies at least twice to produce a sharp relief. Pop. 551/0 (12/17).

2010-S 25C Yosemite NP - Silver PR70DCAM PCGS #418840

The 2010-S Proof Yosemite National Park Silver Quarter features the third design issued in the America the Beautiful Quarters Program. The 2010-S Proof Yosemite National Park Silver Quarter was only issued in the 2010 America the Beautiful 5 Piece Quarter Proof Set and the 2010 Silver 14 Piece Proof Set. 2010 America the Beautiful Quarters Proof Set: The America the Beautiful Quarters Silver Proof Set went on sale at the U.S Mint on May 27, 2010. Each set contained 5 different America the Beautiful Quarter designs. All 5 coins in the set were composed of 90% silver. Issue Price: The America the beautiful Quarter Silver 5 Piece Set was priced at $32.95 each, if purchased directly from the U.S. Mint. 2010 Silver Proof Set: The 2010 Silver 14 Piece Proof Set went on sale on the U.S. Mint web site on August 26, 2010. Each set had an example of each circulating coin but in a proof format and it had a total of 14 coins in the set. The Roosevelt Dime, the 5 different America the Beautiful Quarters and the Kennedy Half were composed of 90% silver. All other coins in the set were composed of the same metal composition as before. Issue Price: The 2010 Silver Proof Set had a price of 56.95 each if purchased directly from the U.S. Mint. Obverse: The obverse of the coin features the same George Washington bust design used on all Quarters from 1999 to date. Reverse: The reverse depicts El Capitan stone. This is the largest single stone of granite in the world and it is over 3,000 feet high. Yosemite National Park: The Yosemite National Park is located in California. The Park was established as a national site on October 01, 1890. The Yosemite National Park contains several waterfalls and large sequoia trees. It also has approximately 1,200 square miles of deep valleys and grand meadows throughout the park. Program Overview: The America the Beautiful Park Quarters Program began in 2010. It will honor a total of 56 National Parks and National Sites throughout the United States and the U.S. Territories. Five different reverse designs will be released each year in the order in which the site was established as a historic national site. Public Law: Public Law 110-456. Pop. 1,039/0 (12/17).

2010-S 25C Grand Canyon NP PR70DCAM PCGS #418843

The 2010-S Proof Grand Canyon Quarter is the fourth design issued in the America the Beautiful Quarters Program. The 2010-S Proof Grand Canyon Quarter was initially sold in a 2010 America the Beautiful Quarters (5 Piece) Proof Set. Later in the year, it was also issued in a separate 2010 (14 Coin) Proof Set. (Read about the different Proof Sets below...) 2010 America the Beautiful (5 Coin) Proof Set: The 2010 (5 Coin) Proof Set was first sold by the U.S. Mint on May 13, 2010 at 12:00 Noon (ET). Each set had a price of $14.95 each. Each set contained all five different designs of the 2010 America the Beautiful Quarters. 2010 (14 Coin) Proof Set: The 2010 Proof Set was first sold by the U.S. Mint on July 22, 2010 at 12:00 Noon (ET). Each set had a price of $31.95 each. Each set contained a Lincoln cent, Jefferson Nickel, Roosevelt Dime, Kennedy Half Dollar, Native American Half Dollar, the five America the Beautiful Quarters and four Presidential Dollars all Proof and from the year 2010. All Proof coins in the set were struck on specially prepared blanks which are polished and cleaned prior to striking. This gives the coins strong mirror like surfaces and a deep cameo appearance. The blanks were then struck by polished dies at least twice to produce a sharp relief. Pop. 509/0 (12/17).

2010-S 25C Grand Canyon NP - Silver PR70DCAM PCGS #418846

The 2010-S Proof Grand Canyon National Park Silver Quarter features the fourth design issued in the America the Beautiful Quarters Program. The 2010-S Proof Grand Canyon National Park Silver Quarter was only issued in the 2010 America the Beautiful Quarters Proof Set and the 2010 Silver Proof Set. 2010 America the Beautiful Quarters Silver Proof Set: The America the Beautiful Quarters Silver Proof Set went on sale at the U.S. Mint on May 27, 2010. Each set contained all 5 different America the beautiful Quarter designs. All 5 coins in the set were composed of 90% silver. Issue Price: The America the Beautiful Quarters Silver 5 Piece Proof Set was priced at $32.95 each, if purchased directly from the U.S. Mint. 2010 Silver Proof Set: The 2010 Silver Proof Set went on sale on the U.S. Mint web site on August 26, 2010. Each set had an example of each circulating coin but in a proof format and it had a total of 14 coins in the set. The Roosevelt Dime, the 5 different America the Beautiful Quarters and the Kennedy Half were composed of 90% silver. All other coins in the set were composed of the same metal composition as before. Issue Price: The 2010 14 Piece Silver Proof Set had a price of 56.95 each if purchased directly from the U.S. Mint. Obverse: The obverse of the coin features the same George Washington bust design used on all Quarters from 1999 to date. Reverse: The reverse of the coin features stone and mortar granaries which are located above the Nankoweap Deltas. The granaries were used by some of the Grand Canyon’s earliest settlers to store seeds, corn, beans and other crops. Grand Canyon National Park: The Grand Canyon National Park located in Arizona, was established as a national site on February 20, 1893. The Grand Canyon National Park is a large canyon carved by the Colorado River. The Grand Canyon is approximately 277 miles long and in some areas, up to 18 miles wide. Program Overview: The America the Beautiful Park Quarters Program began in 2010. It will honor a total of 56 National Parks and National Sites throughout the United States and the U.S. Territories. Five different reverse designs will be released each year in the order in which the site was established as a historic national site. Public Law: Public Law 110-456. Pop. 1,078/0 (12/17).

2011 1C Shield MS68RD PCGS #505055

Pop. 27/0 (1/18) Mintage: 2,402,400,000.

2011-S 1C Shield PR70DCAM PCGS #505063

This is the second year in which the Mint used the Lincoln Shield design. The 2011 Proof Shield Lincoln cents were sold in regular Proof and also in Silver Proof sets from 2011. 2011 Proof Set: The 2011 Proof Set consists of 14 Different coins which include the Shield Cent, Jefferson Nickel, Roosevelt Dime, Kennedy Half Dollar, Native American Dollar, 4 different Presidential Dollars and finally, the 5 different America the Beautiful Quarters. The 2011 Proof Set originally went on sale at the U.S. Mint on January 11, 2011. The price of each set was originally priced at $31.95 if purchased directly from the U.S Mint. 2011 Silver Proof Set: The 2011 Proof Set consists of 14 Different coins which include the Shield Cent, Jefferson Nickel, Native American Dollar and 4 different Presidential Dollars. It also included the following coins that were composed of 90% silver, which are the Roosevelt Dime, Kennedy Half Dollar, and finally, the 5 different America the Beautiful Quarters. The 2011 Silver Proof Set originally went on sale at the U.S. Mint on January 25, 2011. The price of each set was originally priced at $67.95 if purchased directly from the U.S Mint. Pop. 334/0 (6/14) Mintage: 1,673.010.

2011-P 5C MS67FS PCGS #505066

The 2011-P Nickels were produced in large quantities therefore coins can still be easily obtainable from circulation. Even coins grading up to MS65 can still be found by searching. In grades of MS66 they are a bit more scarce requiring some effort to find either in circulation or from rolls or bags. In MS67 they are very scarce and possibly most examples in this grade came from original rolls or bags. None have been discovered in higher grades than MS67 but if one or more are found they are definitely very scarce. Pop. (76/1) (6/14) Mintage: 450,000,000.

2011-D 5C MS67FS PCGS #505068

Pop. (90/1) (6/14) Mintage: 383,040,000.

2011-S 5C PR70DCAM PCGS #505069

The 2011 Proof Jefferson Nickels were sold in regular Proof sets from 2011. 2011 Proof Set: The 2011 Proof Set consists of 14 Different coins which include the Shield Cent, Jefferson Nickel, Roosevelt Dime, Kennedy Half Dollar, Native American Dollar, 4 different Presidential Dollars and finally, the 5 different America the Beautiful Quarters. The 2011 Proof Set originally went on sale at the U.S. Mint on January 11, 2011. The price of each set was originally priced at $31.95 if purchased directly from the U.S Mint. Pop. 310/0 (6/14) Mintage: 1,453,276.

2011-D 25C Olympic NP MS67 PCGS #505146

Pop. 70/0 (11/17) Mintage: 37,600,000.

2011-D 25C Vicksburg NP MS67 PCGS #505148

The Vicksburg National Military Park quarter is the ninth coin issued in the America the Beautiful Quarters program. The coins were officially released on August 30, 2011 at 9:30 a.m. (C.T) at the USS Cairo Museum located in Vicksburg, Mississippi. The Mint also held a ceremony to celebrate the release of the coin. After the ceremony, the public exchanged $10 Vicksburg Quarter rolls at face value. The Vicksburg Quarters were authorized by Public Law: 110-455. Pop. 58 (1/18) Mintage: 37,600,000.

2011-D 25C Chickasaw NP MS67 PCGS #505150

Pop. 43/0 (1/18) Mintage: 37,600,000.

1796 Medal Washington Repub Ameri MS66BN PCGS #508309

Captain-Blacksmith, George Appleton (1896-1862); born 29 July Ipswich, Essex. Massachusetts; married Mehitable Lovering (1801-1862) 29 May 1821 Hamilton, Essex, Massachusetts; died 21 November Hamilton, Essex, Massachusetts. Letitia: born in Virginia.

2012-S 25C El Yunque NP - Silver PR70DCAM PCGS #510078

The 2012 El Yunque Quarter is the first Quarter to be released in 2012. It is also the 11th Quarter to be released in the America the Beautiful Quarters Program. Obverse: Obverse features George Washington's bust design that has been used since 1932. Reverse: The reverse design features a Puerto Rican Parrot and a Coqui tree frog. The design also shows a epiphyte plant with tropical flora in the background. The design also has the inscriptions, "El Yunque, Puerto Rico, 2012 and E Pluribus Unum.Pop. 329/0 (7/14).

2012-W $1 Infantry MS70 PCGS #511162

The 2012 Infantry Uncirculated Silver Dollar was struck to honor the Infantry of the United States. Obverse: The obverse shows an Infantry soldier on top of a rock giving orders to other soldiers to follow him, this symbolizes the ‘Follow Me” motto of the Infantry. The obverse has the inscriptions “Liberty, In God We Trust, 2012 W.” Reverse: The reverse design features two crossed rifles insignia, which is the insignia for the Infantry. The reverse has the incriptions, United States of America, One Dollar, E Pluribus Unum.” Issue Date: February 16, 2012. Pop. 907/0 (12/17) Mintage: 110,000.

2012-S 1C Shield PR70DCAM PCGS #511252

The 2012-S Proof Lincoln Cent is the third year in which the Mint struck the Lincoln Cent with a Shield Reverse design. Most 2012-S Proof Lincoln Cents were well struck ranging from about PR67 - PR69 Deep Cameo condition. Perfect Proof 70 Deep Cameo coins were much more difficult to find but enough examples were struck to meet collectors demand. Pop. 82/0 (6/14) Mintage: 1,237,415.

2012-W $5 Star-Spangled Banner First Strike PR70DCAM PCGS #511492

Kassidy Page and Kelsey Nicole Vorkink

2012-P 5C MS67FS PCGS #511549

The 2012-P Jefferson Nickel is very common in most grades. Examples can easily be found in circulation with enough searching. Only in MS67 condition or higher does it become scarce. Pop. 19/0 (6/14) Mintage: 383,040,000.

2012-D 5C MS67FS PCGS #511552

The 2012-D Jefferson Nickel is very common as the mintage is well over 380 million. Examples in MS66 appear to be a little difficult to find but with enough searching, a nice example in this condition can be found. In MS67 condition it is scarce with possibly hundreds, if not thousands of examples out there. However, with such a large mintage the time involved to find one would be monumental. Therefore, MS67 examples are considered very scarce. Pop. 33/1 (6/14) Mintage: 383,040,000.

2012-S 5C PR70DCAM PCGS #511871

Pop. 187/0 (6/14) Mintage: 1,237,926.

2012-W $10 Gold Eagle PR70DCAM PCGS #512107

he 2012-W Proof Gold Eagles were issued by the U.S. Mint on April 19, 2012. The coins were offered in a four coin proof set, which consisted of the 1/10 ounce, ¼ ounce, ½ ounce and the 1 ounce Proof Gold Eagle. The coins could have also been purchased as a single coin option. 2012-W Proof Gold Eagle Product, Mintage Limits & Issue Price Size/Denomination Product Limit Maximum Mintage Issue Price 1 oz. ($50 Coin) 30,000 60,000 $1935.00 1/2 oz. ($25 Coin) 10,000 40,000 $981.00 1/4 oz. ($10 Coin) 12,000 42,000 $503.00 1/10 oz. ($5 Coin) 25,000 55,000 $215.50 4 Coin Proof Set 30,000 $3,585.00

2012-S $1 Native American PR70DCAM PCGS #512844

The 2012-S Proof Native American Dollar came really well struck. Most examples came in about PR68-PR69 Deep Cameo condition. Perfect PR70 Deep Cameo examples were more difficult to find. Pop. 163/0 (6/14).

2012-W $10 Frances Cleveland 2nd MS70 PCGS #512928

The 2012-W Frances Cleveland (coins second Term) are the last designs issued in 2012 for the Spouse Coin Program. The coins were struck in both Uncirculated and Proof format. Obverse: The obverse features an image of Frances Cleveland. It has the inscriptions Frances Cleveland, In God We Trust, Liberty, 2012, and 24th 1893-1897. Reverse: Reverse of the coin features Frances Cleveland and her husband greeting the public. The reverse design was designed to represent her popularity with the public. Pop. 485/0 (12/17).

2014-S 25C Arches NP PR70DCAM PCGS #524145

Pop. 376/0 (3/15).

2014-S 1C Shield PR70DCAM PCGS #524419

Pop. 228/0 (3/15).

2014-P 5C MS67FS PCGS #524441

Pop. 41/3 (1/15) Mintage: 383,040,000.

2014-S 5C PR70DCAM PCGS #524444

Pop. 282/0 (3/15).

2014-S 10C PR70DCAM PCGS #524451

Pop. 658/0 (1/15).

2014-S 10C Silver PR70DCAM PCGS #524453

Pop. 411/171 (1/15).

2014-S 50C PR70DCAM PCGS #524466

Pop. 162/0 (3/15).

2014-D 25C Everglades NP MS68 PCGS #524901

Pop. 21/0 (1/15) Mintage: 37,600,000.

2014-P 25C Great Sand Dunes NP MS67 PCGS #524910

Pop. 45/3 (1/15) Mintage: 37,600,000.

2014-D 25C Great Sand Dunes NP MS67 PCGS #524915

Pop. 47/6 (1/15) Mintage: 37,600,000.

2014-D 25C Arches NP MS68 PCGS #524919

Pop. 23/1 (12/17) Mintage: 37,600,000.

2014-P 25C Shenandoah NP MS67 PCGS #524925

Pop. 73/0 (1/15) Mintage: 37,600,000.

2014-P 25C Great Smoky Mtns NP MS67 PCGS #524931

Pop. 56/0 (1/15) Mintage: 37,600,000.

2014-S 50C Silver PR70DCAM PCGS #528363

Pop. 363/0 (3/15).

"1737" 3P Higley, Brass Bolen Copy MS65 PCGS #535247

Lionel Worth (1737-1805): born 19 April Nantucket, Nantucket, Massachusetts Bay, British Colonial America; married Martha Mitchell (1739-1832) 1758 Massachusetts Bay, British Colonial America; died 9 August Starksboro, Addison, Vermont, USA. John Rowe (1737-1812): born 1 July New Haven, New Haven, Connecticut Colony, British Colonial America; married Hepzibah Lord (1737-1799) 26 November 1777; died 22 January Sullivan, Cheshire, New Hampshire, USA. Hepzibah Lord (1737-1799): born 22 June Lyme, New London, Connecticut Colony, British Colonial America; married John Rowe (1737-1812) Lyme, New London, Connecticut Colony, British Colonial America; died 25 April Gilsum, Cheshire, New Hampshire, USA.

2006-P 25C Nevada Satin Finish SP69 PCGS #839020

The 2006-P Nevada Satin Finish Quarter is usually well struck. So, most examples are usually in higher grades, especially since they weren't issued for circulation and only sold in special mint sets. Examples in SP68 condition appear to be the norm. In SP69 they are much scarcer, yet, affordable for most collectors. Pop. 55/0 (5/18).

2006 1C Satin Finish SP70RD PCGS #893196

Pop. 32/0 2/23/2022 Mintage: 847,361

2006-D 1C Satin Finish SP69RD PCGS #893199

Pop. 94/0 (11/17) Mintage: 847,361.

2001-S 25C New York PR70DCAM PCGS #913017

Pop. (349/0) (6/14) Mintage: 3,093,273.

2001-S 25C New York Silver PR70DCAM PCGS #913018

Pop. (313/0) (6/14) Mintage: 889,694.

2001-S 25C North Carolina PR70DCAM PCGS #913019

The 2012-S Proof North Carolina Quarter is a common date in the series. Examples normally range in the PR68-PR70 Deep Cameo grades. Pop. (340/)) (6/14) Mintage: 3,093,273.

2001-S 25C North Carolina Silver PR70DCAM PCGS #913020

Pop. (309/0) (6/14) Mintage: 889,694.

2001-S 25C Rhode Island PR70DCAM PCGS #913021

Pop. (307/0) (6/14) Mintage: 3,093,273.

2001-S 25C Rhode Island Silver PR70DCAM PCGS #913022

Pop. (289/0) (6/14) Mintage" 889,694.

2001-S 25C Vermont PR70DCAM PCGS #913023

Pop. (448/0) (6/14) Mintage: 3,093,273.

2001-S 25C Vermont Silver PR70DCAM PCGS #913024

Pop. 427/0 (6/14) Mintage: 889,694.

2001-S 25C Kentucky PR70DCAM PCGS #913025

Pop. 350/0 (6/14) Mintage: 3,093,273.

2001-S 25C Kentucky Silver PR70DCAM PCGS #913026

Pop. 353/0 (6/14) Mintage: 889,694.

2003-S 25C Illinois PR70DCAM PCGS #913037

Pop. 412/0 (6/14) Mintage: 3,408,516.

2003-S 25C Illinois Silver PR70DCAM PCGS #913038

Pop. 423/0 (6/14) Mintage: 1,125,755.

2003-S 25C Alabama PR70DCAM PCGS #913039

Pop. 406/0 (7/14) Mintage: 3,408,516.

2003-S 25C Alabama Silver PR70DCAM PCGS #913040

Pop. 436/0 (7/14) Mintage: 1,125,755.

2003-S 25C Maine PR70DCAM PCGS #913041

Pop. 303/0 (7/14) Mintage: 3,408,516.

2003-S 25C Maine Silver PR70DCAM PCGS #913042

Pop. 354/0 (7/14) Mintage: 1,125,755.

2003-S 25C Missouri PR70DCAM PCGS #913043

Pop. 366/0 (7/14) Mintage: 3,408,516.

2003-S 25C Missouri Silver PR70DCAM PCGS #913044

Pop. 431/0 (7/14) Mintage: 1,125,755.

2003-S 25C Arkansas PR70DCAM PCGS #913045

Pop. 472/0 (7/14) Mintage: 3,408516.

2003-S 25C Arkansas Silver PR70DCAM PCGS #913046

Pop. 460/0 (7/14) Mintage: 1,125,755.

2005-S 25C California PR70DCAM PCGS #913057

2005-S 25C California PR70DC Pop. (488/0) (7/14).

2005-S 25C California Silver PR70DCAM PCGS #913058

2005-S 25C California Silver PR70DC Pop. (569/0) (7/14).

2005-S 25C Minnesota PR70DCAM PCGS #913059

2005-S 25C Minnesota PR70DC Pop. (450/0) (7/14).

2005-S 25C Minnesota Silver PR70DCAM PCGS #913060

2005-S 25C Minnesota Silver PR70DC Pop. (469/0) (7/14).

2005-S 25C Oregon PR70DCAM PCGS #913061

Pop. 579/0 (1/18) Mintage: 3,262,960.