cardinal's Coin Album

1792 Medal Maz-318 MS63 PCGS #518892

Ex: Norweb Collection

1792 Medal Maz-318 MS64 PCGS #518892

Sometimes referred to as the "French" Libertas medal, this medal commemorates the convention of artists in Lyon in 1792. Clearly, the flowing hair portrait of Liberty and Liberty Cap of the Libertas Americana medal show their influence here.

1792 Medal Maz-318 MS64 PCGS #518892

Sometimes referred to as the "French" Libertas medal, this medal commemorates the convention of artists in Lyon in 1792. Clearly, the flowing hair portrait of Liberty and Liberty Cap of the Libertas Americana medal show their influence here.

1792 Medal Maz-318a MS63 PCGS #568457

Sometimes referred to as the "French" Libertas medal, this medal commemorates the convention of artists in Lyon in 1792. Clearly, the flowing hair portrait of Liberty and Liberty Cap of the Libertas Americana medal show their influence here. While this medal was struck with the same dies, this one was struck on a thicker planchet.

No Date Jeton Paris Mint Wishes Token Libertas Francoise MS63 PCGS #616340

This French Jeton combines the obverse of the France Liberte Francoise Lyon Convention medal with a new reverse, translated as "Best Wishes." The cornucopia hall mark on the reverse places this as a somewhat modern creation.

"1792" Medal Maz-318 Var 36mm Ae Corne MS65 PCGS #775877

This a Paris Mint restrike struck in brass, as noted by the cornucopia and the abbreviation BZ at the bottom of the obverse.

1797 1/2C 1 Above 1 AU55BN PCGS #1042

Starting with the Half Cents of 1795, the image of Miss Liberty is noticeably smaller than those of 1794, but still display her flowing hair beneath her Liberty Cap.

1795 H10C MS61 PCGS #4251

The so-called "half dimes" of 1794 and 1795 were struck in silver, and measured just 16.5mm. With just that small size, the design needed to be thrifty. Miss Liberty still retains her flowing hair, but no longer has her Liberty Cap or pole.

1795 $1 3 Leaves AU55 PCGS #6852

Like the half dollars of 1794 and 1795, the dollars of 1794 and 1795 provided a canvas for artistic designs. While the dollars of 1794 were all struck from one set of dies, the flowing hair dollars of 1795 were struck in much larger quantities, using multiple dies with multiple nuances of their designs. Alas, as with the other silver denominations, Miss Liberty no longer has her Liberty Cap or pole.

1792 10C J-10 SP62BN PCGS #11026

With the R-6 copper pattern Disme of 1792, we see the direct influence of the famed Libertas Americana medal on the genesis of coinage designs for the new United States Mint. As the Senate and House of Representatives debated back and forth as to coinage designs to be mandated within the "Mint Act," or, more accurately, "An Act Establishing a Mint, and Regulating the Coins of the United States," the Senate was in favor of using the President's portait for circulating coinage. The House of Representatives, though, was steadfast in its resolve that coinage should bear an "image emblematic of Liberty." Ultimately, the Senate accepted the Representatives' resolution, and the Mint Act was signed into law on April 2, 1792. The copper Disme patterns were among the earliest patterns produced for the new coinage of the United States, and from there, the beautiful flowing hair design of the Libertas Americana Medal spread throughout the copper coinage of 1793 through 1797, and the silver coinage of 1794 and 1795.

1792 10C J-10 SP62BN PCGS #11026

With the R-6 copper pattern Disme of 1792, we see the direct influence of the famed Libertas Americana medal on the genesis of coinage designs for the new United States Mint. As the Senate and House of Representatives debated back and forth as to coinage designs to be mandated within the "Mint Act," or, more accurately, "An Act Establishing a Mint, and Regulating the Coins of the United States," the Senate was in favor of using the President's portait for circulating coinage. The House of Representatives, though, was steadfast in its resolve that coinage should bear an "image emblematic of Liberty." Ultimately, the Senate accepted the Representatives' resolution, and the Mint Act was signed into law on April 2, 1792. The copper Disme patterns were among the earliest patterns produced for the new coinage of the United States, and from there, the beautiful flowing hair design of the Libertas Americana Medal spread throughout the copper coinage of 1793 through 1797, and the silver coinage of 1794 and 1795.

1793 1/2C Cohen 3 MS62BN PCGS #35009

With the 1793 half cent, we see the obvious influence of the Libertas Americana medal flowing through the 1792 Disme, including Miss Liberty's cap and pole. In fact, when the design of the 1793 half cent is overlayed on top of the Disme, we see that the die punch for Miss Liberty's profile is precisely the same, and just Liberty's flowing tresses were remodeled. In describing Liberty's flowing hair, some have written that it was Miss Liberty facing the wind with her hair freely flowing behind her. The left-facing profile with flowing hair is shared only between the Libertas Americana medal, the 1792 Disme, and the 1793 Half Cent. Perhaps Benjamin Franklin thought it proper to have Miss Liberty facing left, as his position in France would have him looking leftward to face the newborn country America. All of the remaining Flowing Hair coinages depict Miss Liberty facing to the right, perhaps facing into the future.

1794 1/2C C-1a Lg Edge Letters AU58BN PCGS #35018

With all the denominations of 1794 and later, Miss Liberty's flowing hair is at the left, with Miss Liberty facing to the right. The 1794 Half Cents present an interesting group. Again, the die punch for the profile of Miss Liberty is the same; however, certain varieties show her flowing hair in a low level of relief (as seen here), and other varieties depict her hair in a noticeably higher level of relief. All of the half cents of 1794 use a large portrait of Miss Liberty, taking up most of the space on the obverse.

1793 Chain 1C S-3 AMERICA AU55BN PCGS #35438

The so-called "Chain Cent," is an early oddity, designed based on elements of the Fugio Cent and the Birch Cent, yet retaining Miss Liberty's flowing hair. Of course, the Fugio Cent depicted just the 13 original colonies in circles on the reverse. By 1793, there were then 15 states, not 13, and so there should be 15 links to the design instead of 13. As nicely as the 13 interlinked circles fit on the 1787 Fugio cent, the 15 linked circles would have been quite cramped on the new cent. Recognizing how cramped the design might look, the designer might have wished to unclutter the design, by flattening the circles into oblong ovals, to open up the fields. Unfortunately, the resulting appearance of the Chain, quickly found public disfavor. The March 18, 1793 edition of Claypoole’s Daily Advertiser stated the opinion, “The chain on the reverse is but a bad omen for liberty.” The ill-fated chain cent design was promptly discontinued, and soon replaced by the wreath cent. While the chain reverse gains all the attention, the obverse of the Chain Cent is interesting in its own right. It would appear that the portrait of Liberty was either by Bob Birch, or after his design, for her eye, nose, mouth, chin and hair outline are quite similar to the Birch Cent pattern. Alas, lacking in certain of the refinements of the Birch design, she came to be called by William Sheldon as the "wild squaw with the heebie jeebies."

1793 Chain 1C S-3 AMERICA AU55BN PCGS #35438

The so-called "Chain Cent," is an early oddity, designed based on elements of the Fugio Cent and the Birch Cent, yet retaining Miss Liberty's flowing hair. Of course, the Fugio Cent depicted just the 13 original colonies in circles on the reverse. By 1793, there were then 15 states, not 13, and so there should be 15 links to the design instead of 13. As nicely as the 13 interlinked circles fit on the 1787 Fugio cent, the 15 linked circles would have been quite cramped on the new cent. Recognizing how cramped the design might look, the designer might have wished to unclutter the design, by flattening the circles into oblong ovals, to open up the fields. Unfortunately, the resulting appearance of the Chain, quickly found public disfavor. The March 18, 1793 edition of Claypoole’s Daily Advertiser stated the opinion, “The chain on the reverse is but a bad omen for liberty.” The ill-fated chain cent design was promptly discontinued, and soon replaced by the wreath cent. While the chain reverse gains all the attention, the obverse of the Chain Cent is interesting in its own right. It would appear that the portrait of Liberty was either by Bob Birch, or after his design, for her eye, nose, mouth, chin and hair outline are quite similar to the Birch Cent pattern. Alas, lacking in certain of the refinements of the Birch design, she came to be called by William Sheldon as the "wild squaw with the heebie jeebies."

1793 Wreath 1C S-8 Vine and Bars Edge MS63BN PCGS #35456

Comparing the Disme pattern with the Wreath Cent, we see the very clear similarities of the designs. Liberty's profile and the styling of her flowing locks amply reflect an artistic hand. The public still did not like the design, however, finding Miss Liberty to be "too unkempt" for polite society. The Wreath Cent was soon discontinued, to be replaced by the Liberty Cap design.

1793 Wreath 1C S-8 Vine and Bars Edge MS63BN PCGS #35456

Comparing the Disme pattern with the Wreath Cent, we see the very clear similarities of the designs. Liberty's profile and the styling of her flowing locks amply reflect an artistic hand. The public still did not like the design, however, finding Miss Liberty to be "too unkempt" for polite society. The Wreath Cent was soon discontinued, to be replaced by the Liberty Cap design.

1793 1C S-14 Liberty Cap AU53+ BN PCGS #35492

Provenance: Purchased in England from a non-collector by James F. Ruddy in 1962; Q. David Bowers; Lester Merkin; Charles Jay Collection; Stack's sale of the Charles Jay Collection, October 1967, lot 91; unknown intermediaries (perhaps Lester Merkin); Anthony Terranova; Herman Halpern Collection, by sale; R.E. "Ted" Naftzger, Jr. Collection, by trade, December 1986; Eric Streiner, by sale, en bloc, via Stack's, February 1992; Jay Parrino (The Mint), by sale; Jack Wadlington Collection, by sale, May 1996; Daniel W. Holmes, Jr. Collection, by sale, via Chris McCawley and Bob Grellman, June 2005; Ira and Larry Goldberg Coins and Collectibles' sale of the Dan Holmes Collection, September 2009, lot 24, via Larry Hanks; D. Brent Pogue.

1795 1C S-78 Plain Edge MS63BN PCGS #35729

The Liberty Cap Cents followed the Wreath Cent in 1793 and continued on into 1796. Over those years, many different die varieties were struck by the U.S. Mint. All feature Miss Liberty's flowing hair and her Liberty Cap on pole.

1820 1C N-13 Large Date MS66RB PCGS #36674

N-13 Noyes #20984

1820 1C N-13 Large Date MS66RB PCGS #36674

N-13 Noyes #20984

1839 1C N-11 Booby Head MS66RB PCGS #37247

The Year 1839 was a very active one for the Mint's engravers, resulting in no less than three distinctly different styles of the Coronet Cent (and the first Braided Hair Cents). 19th century coin dealer Ebenezer Locke Mason described the distinguishing features of each, including two with rather colorful nicknames of "Silly Head" and "Booby Head." All four portrait styles are present in the collection, including the "Head of 1838" (N-3 Noyes #20596), the "Silly Head" (N-9 Noyes #20945), the "Booby Head" (N-11 Noyes #20819), and the Braided Hair "Head of 1840" (N-8, not in Noyes).

1839 1C N-11 Booby Head MS66RB PCGS #37247

The Year 1839 was a very active one for the Mint's engravers, resulting in no less than three distinctly different styles of the Coronet Cent (and the first Braided Hair Cents). 19th century coin dealer Ebenezer Locke Mason described the distinguishing features of each, including two with rather colorful nicknames of "Silly Head" and "Booby Head." All four portrait styles are present in the collection, including the "Head of 1838" (N-3 Noyes #20596), the "Silly Head" (N-9 Noyes #20945), the "Booby Head" (N-11 Noyes #20819), and the Braided Hair "Head of 1840" (N-8, not in Noyes).

1839 1C N-11 Booby Head MS66RB PCGS #37247

The Year 1839 was a very active one for the Mint's engravers, resulting in no less than three distinctly different styles of the Coronet Cent (and the first Braided Hair Cents). 19th century coin dealer Ebenezer Locke Mason described the distinguishing features of each, including two with rather colorful nicknames of "Silly Head" and "Booby Head." All four portrait styles are present in the collection, including the "Head of 1838" (N-3 Noyes #20596), the "Silly Head" (N-9 Noyes #20945), the "Booby Head" (N-11 Noyes #20819), and the Braided Hair "Head of 1840" (N-8, not in Noyes).

1839 1C N-11 Booby Head MS66RB PCGS #37247

The Year 1839 was a very active one for the Mint's engravers, resulting in no less than three distinctly different styles of the Coronet Cent (and the first Braided Hair Cents). 19th century coin dealer Ebenezer Locke Mason described the distinguishing features of each, including two with rather colorful nicknames of "Silly Head" and "Booby Head." All four portrait styles are present in the collection, including the "Head of 1838" (N-3 Noyes #20596), the "Silly Head" (N-9 Noyes #20945), the "Booby Head" (N-11 Noyes #20819), and the Braided Hair "Head of 1840" (N-8, not in Noyes).

1839 1C N-11 Booby Head MS66RB PCGS #37247

The Year 1839 was a very active one for the Mint's engravers, resulting in no less than three distinctly different styles of the Coronet Cent (and the first Braided Hair Cents). 19th century coin dealer Ebenezer Locke Mason described the distinguishing features of each, including two with rather colorful nicknames of "Silly Head" and "Booby Head." All four portrait styles are present in the collection, including the "Head of 1838" (N-3 Noyes #20596), the "Silly Head" (N-9 Noyes #20945), the "Booby Head" (N-11 Noyes #20819), and the Braided Hair "Head of 1840" (N-8, not in Noyes).

1839 1C N-11 Booby Head MS66RB PCGS #37247

The Year 1839 was a very active one for the Mint's engravers, resulting in no less than three distinctly different styles of the Coronet Cent (and the first Braided Hair Cents). 19th century coin dealer Ebenezer Locke Mason described the distinguishing features of each, including two with rather colorful nicknames of "Silly Head" and "Booby Head." All four portrait styles are present in the collection, including the "Head of 1838" (N-3 Noyes #20596), the "Silly Head" (N-9 Noyes #20945), the "Booby Head" (N-11 Noyes #20819), and the Braided Hair "Head of 1840" (N-8, not in Noyes).

1795 50C Overton 115 AU55 PCGS #39231

The half dollars of 1794 and 1795 were large enough for an attractive artistic version of Miss Liberty. Indeed, as the small half dime design was more akin to the obverse of the Wreath Cent, the half dollar was much refined and certainly not "too unkempt." Alas, as with the half dime, however, Miss Liberty no longer has her Liberty Cap or pole.

(1781) Medal Libertas Americana Silver MS62 PCGS #151000

The unanimous choice for the Number 1 spot in the 100 Greatest American Medals and Tokens, the original 1780's Libertas Americana Medals have been famous for the entirety of their 200+ year history. Conceived, commissioned, and funded by Benjamin Franklin himself, the Medals were ordered and delivered on at least four separate occasions between March 1783 and September 1784, likely totaling to 60 silver medals and 200 bronze. Each order included silver and bronze medals, all struck from a single set of dies, which still remain at the Paris Mint. Accordingly, some of the bronze medals were struck before certain of the silver medals. Progressive deterioration of the dies can be seen, and can distinguish early strikes from late strikes. From this, we can know that the first group of silver medals were struck before the bronze medals, as all bronze examples seen show greater die damage than the earliest of the silver medals. The specific silver example seen here displays the very earliest state of the dies seen by this researcher, and thus was likely included in the first group of 20 silver medals delivered to Franklin and covered with his payment of April 4th, 1783. These earliest of medals were presented personally by Franklin, and are thought to have been accompanied by hand-written copies of the "Explication" of their symbolism and meaning, using the draft sent to Franklin on March 31, 1783 by Abbe Andre Morellet. The Explication was later printed in an official format by Philippe-Denis Pierres, with 300 copies delivered to Franklin on May 5, 1783. Today, original specimens of the Explication are exceedingly rare, with the example in the Collection being perhaps the sole copy in private hands.

(1781) Medal Libertas Americana Silver MS62 PCGS #151000

The unanimous choice for the Number 1 spot in the 100 Greatest American Medals and Tokens, the original 1780's Libertas Americana Medals have been famous for the entirety of their 200+ year history. Conceived, commissioned, and funded by Benjamin Franklin himself, the Medals were ordered and delivered on at least four separate occasions between March 1783 and September 1784, likely totaling to 60 silver medals and 200 bronze. Each order included silver and bronze medals, all struck from a single set of dies, which still remain at the Paris Mint. Accordingly, some of the bronze medals were struck before certain of the silver medals. Progressive deterioration of the dies can be seen, and can distinguish early strikes from late strikes. From this, we can know that the first group of silver medals were struck before the bronze medals, as all bronze examples seen show greater die damage than the earliest of the silver medals. The specific silver example seen here displays the very earliest state of the dies seen by this researcher, and thus was likely included in the first group of 20 silver medals delivered to Franklin and covered with his payment of April 4th, 1783. These earliest of medals were presented personally by Franklin, and are thought to have been accompanied by hand-written copies of the "Explication" of their symbolism and meaning, using the draft sent to Franklin on March 31, 1783 by Abbe Andre Morellet. The Explication was later printed in an official format by Philippe-Denis Pierres, with 300 copies delivered to Franklin on May 5, 1783. Today, original specimens of the Explication are exceedingly rare, with the example in the Collection being perhaps the sole copy in private hands.

(1781) Medal Libertas Americana Silver MS62 PCGS #151000

The unanimous choice for the Number 1 spot in the 100 Greatest American Medals and Tokens, the original 1780's Libertas Americana Medals have been famous for the entirety of their 200+ year history. Conceived, commissioned, and funded by Benjamin Franklin himself, the Medals were ordered and delivered on at least four separate occasions between March 1783 and September 1784, likely totaling to 60 silver medals and 200 bronze. Each order included silver and bronze medals, all struck from a single set of dies, which still remain at the Paris Mint. Accordingly, some of the bronze medals were struck before certain of the silver medals. Progressive deterioration of the dies can be seen, and can distinguish early strikes from late strikes. From this, we can know that the first group of silver medals were struck before the bronze medals, as all bronze examples seen show greater die damage than the earliest of the silver medals. The specific silver example seen here displays the very earliest state of the dies seen by this researcher, and thus was likely included in the first group of 20 silver medals delivered to Franklin and covered with his payment of April 4th, 1783. These earliest of medals were presented personally by Franklin, and are thought to have been accompanied by hand-written copies of the "Explication" of their symbolism and meaning, using the draft sent to Franklin on March 31, 1783 by Abbe Andre Morellet. The Explication was later printed in an official format by Philippe-Denis Pierres, with 300 copies delivered to Franklin on May 5, 1783. Today, original specimens of the Explication are exceedingly rare, with the example in the Collection being perhaps the sole copy in private hands.

(1781) Medal Libertas Americana Silver MS63+ PCGS #151000

This fabulous specimen of the Original Silver Libertas Americana Medal ranks at the 2nd place in the known population. Tracing back to the legendary coin dealer Virgil Michael Brand, this medal passed on to Burdette Garner Johnson after Virgil's death. Sadly, Burdette Johnson was unmarried. During the Great Depression, Johnson took in a young girl named Mary Cruzan who had been abandoned by her parents. He raised and educated her as his own daughter, and Cruzan later inherited the entirety of Johnson's U.S. colonial coin stock. Cruzan's inherited stock was sold at record auction for $1.1 million USD after Cruzan's own death in 1996. Thereafter, Alan Weinberg owned this medal until it passed to The Cardinal Collection Educational Foundation in January 2013. Truly pristine, this specimen also ranks as the heaviest specimen of the known population, coming from a later die state, with die breaks more notable.

(1781) Medal Libertas Americana Silver MS63+ PCGS #151000

This fabulous specimen of the Original Silver Libertas Americana Medal ranks at the 2nd place in the known population. Tracing back to the legendary coin dealer Virgil Michael Brand, this medal passed on to Burdette Garner Johnson after Virgil's death. Sadly, Burdette Johnson was unmarried. During the Great Depression, Johnson took in a young girl named Mary Cruzan who had been abandoned by her parents. He raised and educated her as his own daughter, and Cruzan later inherited the entirety of Johnson's U.S. colonial coin stock. Cruzan's inherited stock was sold at record auction for $1.1 million USD after Cruzan's own death in 1996. Thereafter, Alan Weinberg owned this medal until it passed to The Cardinal Collection Educational Foundation in January 2013. Truly pristine, this specimen also ranks as the heaviest specimen of the known population, coming from a later die state, with die breaks more notable.

(1781) Medal Libertas Americana Bronze N1BN PCGS #151815

This is a early die state original bronze Libertas Americana medal. I call this one the "Brit" Libertas Americana, as the reverse was carefully tooled to remove the fleur d'lyes, such that there is no reference to France's involvement in the the American's War of Independence.

(1781) Medal Libertas Americana Bronze MS63BN PCGS #151815

Perhaps the single earliest example of Miss Liberty created by Augustin Dupre in metallic form, this unique incused oval die was completely unknown to the world at large until the Dupre Family Archive was released by Augustin's descendants and dispersed in the Spring of 2014. Here we see the genesis of the Flowing Hair Liberty design, with her locks flowing behind her, a single lock crossing her neck, and a phrygian cap beneath the truncation of her bust as a symbol of freedom and the pursuit of Liberty.

(1781) Medal Libertas Americana Bronze MS63BN PCGS #151815

Perhaps the single earliest example of Miss Liberty created by Augustin Dupre in metallic form, this unique incused oval die was completely unknown to the world at large until the Dupre Family Archive was released by Augustin's descendants and dispersed in the Spring of 2014. Here we see the genesis of the Flowing Hair Liberty design, with her locks flowing behind her, a single lock crossing her neck, and a phrygian cap beneath the truncation of her bust as a symbol of freedom and the pursuit of Liberty.

(1781) Medal Libertas Americana Bronze MS65BN PCGS #151815

A fanstastically preserved specimen, this gem bronze example of the Libertas Americana Medal is the finest seen by this researcher. Its die state places it near the middle of the production period, with considerable die damage now visible in comparison to the early die state silver and bronze medals in the Collection, yet not so advanced as the very latest die state examples. The Collection does include a very early die state example, that being the sole Red-Brown bronze Libertas Americana medal.

(1781) Medal Libertas Americana Bronze MS65BN PCGS #151815

A fanstastically preserved specimen, this gem bronze example of the Libertas Americana Medal is the finest seen by this researcher. Its die state places it near the middle of the production period, with considerable die damage now visible in comparison to the early die state silver and bronze medals in the Collection, yet not so advanced as the very latest die state examples. The Collection does include a very early die state example, that being the sole Red-Brown bronze Libertas Americana medal.

1976 Medal Libertas Am. Silver Copy of Original Design MS66 PCGS #509899

An incredibly well-preserved original Silver specimen, formerly from the incomparable collection of Virgil Brand, this medal is a likely contender for the finest known original Silver Libertas Americana Medal (PCGS grading pending). Free from noticeable handling this specimen displays crisp frosted details all the way to the highest points of the design, contrasting with watery mirrored prooflike fields. Utterly and completely fully struck, even the finest of die characteristics stand out boldly for examination. Based on the raised die artifacts, this awe-inspiring example was struck during the later production periods, likely in 1784.

1976 Medal Libertas Am. Silver Copy of Original Design MS67 PCGS #509899

During a visit to the Paris Mint in 1958, John J. Ford re-discovered the previously lost original dies for the Libertas Americana Medal in the Mint's Museum "Musee de Monnaies." As the U.S. Bicentennial grew nearer, he suggested to Stanley Applebaum of First Coinvestors that transfer dies be created for a bicentennial commemorative restriking. First Coinvestors funded the project, in exchange for the exclusive rights of the new dies. The dies were expanded to a diameter of 77mm, and the dates were changed on the obverse and reverse dies. Further markings were added to the edge, to designate the restrikes as "COPY OF DESIGN BY BENJAMIN FRANKLIN - ORIGINAL STRUCK IN 1783". Just 500 examples were struck in silver, as in the specimen seen here. Records report that 3 examples were also struck in gold (likely .920 fineness), but none are known today. Presumably, melted for their high bullion value during 1980.

1976 Medal Libertas Am. Silver Copy of Original Design MS67 PCGS #509899

During a visit to the Paris Mint in 1958, John J. Ford re-discovered the previously lost original dies for the Libertas Americana Medal in the Mint's Museum "Musee de Monnaies." As the U.S. Bicentennial grew nearer, he suggested to Stanley Applebaum of First Coinvestors that transfer dies be created for a bicentennial commemorative restriking. First Coinvestors funded the project, in exchange for the exclusive rights of the new dies. The dies were expanded to a diameter of 77mm, and the dates were changed on the obverse and reverse dies. Further markings were added to the edge, to designate the restrikes as "COPY OF DESIGN BY BENJAMIN FRANKLIN - ORIGINAL STRUCK IN 1783". Just 500 examples were struck in silver, as in the specimen seen here. Records report that 3 examples were also struck in gold (likely .920 fineness), but none are known today. Presumably, melted for their high bullion value during 1980.

(1776) Medal Libertas Am. Silver 2004 Restrike PR68DCAM PCGS #510007

This is one of the advertising tokens created by the Bowers & Merena Galleries, and was issued in 2000.

(1776) Medal Libertas Am. Silver 2004 Restrike PR68DCAM PCGS #510007

This is one of the advertising tokens created by the Bowers & Merena Galleries, and was issued in 2000.

(1776) Medal Libertas Am. Silver 2004 Restrike PR69DCAM PCGS #510007

This unique piece has been named the "White Libertas," but should be known as the "Corded Edge" Libertas." It's origin is unknown, but it is thought to be have been at die trial to cover over the ubiquitous die break always seen beneath the "4" on the bottom of the obverse. It is also thought that after creating this piece, that the corded edge would take away from the all of the historic allegories.

(1776) Medal Libertas Am. Silver 2004 Restrike PR69DCAM PCGS #510007

Clearly, the Paris Mint found a favorable reception for the Libertas Americana Medals it produced during 2000, and so further restrikes were executed in 2004 with greater mintages. The 2004 Silver Libertas Americana Medals, as seen here, were produced to the extent of 15,000 pieces -- all in Deep Cameo Proof format, each 40mm in diameter and containing 24 grams of .999 silver. The new 40mm size of these silver restrikes was the smallest ever issued by the Paris Mint up until that point; however, that size makes them a perfect fit for display in dual-coin holders, allowing both the obverse and reverse to be viewed simultaneously.

(1776) Medal Libertas Am. Silver 2004 Restrike PR69DCAM PCGS #510007

Clearly, the Paris Mint found a favorable reception for the Libertas Americana Medals it produced during 2000, and so further restrikes were executed in 2004 with greater mintages. The 2004 Silver Libertas Americana Medals, as seen here, were produced to the extent of 15,000 pieces -- all in Deep Cameo Proof format, each 40mm in diameter and containing 24 grams of .999 silver. The new 40mm size of these silver restrikes was the smallest ever issued by the Paris Mint up until that point; however, that size makes them a perfect fit for display in dual-coin holders, allowing both the obverse and reverse to be viewed simultaneously.

(1776) Medal Libertas Americana Ag 2005 Restrike MS61 PCGS #510008

While the production quality of the Deep Cameo proof restrikes of 2004 was exceptional, the Paris Mint's follow-up in 2005 did not match that standard. Talisman Coin Company, an official distributor of Monnaie de Paris products, contracted with the Mint to produce circulation-strike examples of the Libertas Americana medals in both Silver and Bronze, with no mintage limits for either. These were intended to be retailed at a lower price point, and thus it appears that production standards were relaxed to facilitate that. Produced at a 50mm diameter with 60 grams of .950 silver, the 2005 Silver Libertas Americana restrike seen here is precisely in the condition it left the Paris Mint; yet, its softened details and finely granular surface (as in all examples seen) merits only the grade of MS61.

(1776) Medal Libertas Americana Ag 2005 Restrike MS61 PCGS #510008

While the production quality of the Deep Cameo proof restrikes of 2004 was exceptional, the Paris Mint's follow-up in 2005 did not match that standard. Talisman Coin Company, an official distributor of Monnaie de Paris products, contracted with the Mint to produce circulation-strike examples of the Libertas Americana medals in both Silver and Bronze, with no mintage limits for either. These were intended to be retailed at a lower price point, and thus it appears that production standards were relaxed to facilitate that. Produced at a 50mm diameter with 60 grams of .950 silver, the 2005 Silver Libertas Americana restrike seen here is precisely in the condition it left the Paris Mint; yet, its softened details and finely granular surface (as in all examples seen) merits only the grade of MS61.

(1776) Medal Libertas Americana Ag 2005 Restrike MS64 PCGS #510008

While the production quality of the Deep Cameo proof restrikes of 2004 was exceptional, the Paris Mint's follow-up in 2005 did not match that standard. Talisman Coin Company, an official distributor of Monnaie de Paris products, contracted with the Mint to produce circulation-strike examples of the Libertas Americana medals in both Silver and Bronze, with no mintage limits for either. These were intended to be retailed at a lower price point, and thus it appears that production standards were relaxed to facilitate that. Using the worn dies from the 1980's production of silver restrikes as the model, these new restrikes were produced at a 50mm diameter with 60 grams of .950 silver. The 2005 Silver Libertas Americana restrike seen here is precisely in the condition it left the Paris Mint and is the single finest known by a wide margin; yet, its softened details and finely granular surface (as in all examples seen) merits only the grade of MS64.

(1776) Medal Libertas Americana Ag 2005 Restrike MS64 PCGS #510008

While the production quality of the Deep Cameo proof restrikes of 2004 was exceptional, the Paris Mint's follow-up in 2005 did not match that standard. Talisman Coin Company, an official distributor of Monnaie de Paris products, contracted with the Mint to produce circulation-strike examples of the Libertas Americana medals in both Silver and Bronze, with no mintage limits for either. These were intended to be retailed at a lower price point, and thus it appears that production standards were relaxed to facilitate that. Using the worn dies from the 1980's production of silver restrikes as the model, these new restrikes were produced at a 50mm diameter with 60 grams of .950 silver. The 2005 Silver Libertas Americana restrike seen here is precisely in the condition it left the Paris Mint and is the single finest known by a wide margin; yet, its softened details and finely granular surface (as in all examples seen) merits only the grade of MS64.

(1776) Medal Libertas Americana AE 2005 Restrike MS62 PCGS #510009

As with the 2005 Silver Libertas Americana restrikes, the 2005 Bronze restrikes feature softened details and finely granular surfaces, these produced at a 47mm size from 57 grams of pure bronze. Like its Silver counterpart in the Collection, the Bronze example seen here is precisely in the condition it left the Paris Mint; yet, it merits only the grade of MS62RB.

(1776) Medal Libertas Americana AE 2005 Restrike MS62 PCGS #510009

As with the 2005 Silver Libertas Americana restrikes, the 2005 Bronze restrikes feature softened details and finely granular surfaces, these produced at a 47mm size from 57 grams of pure bronze. Like its Silver counterpart in the Collection, the Bronze example seen here is precisely in the condition it left the Paris Mint; yet, it merits only the grade of MS62RB.

(1776) Medal Libertas Americana AE 2005 Restrike MS63 PCGS #510009

As with the 2005 Silver Libertas Americana restrikes, the 2005 Bronze restrikes feature softened details and finely granular surfaces, these produced at a 47mm size from 57 grams of pure bronze. Like its Silver counterpart in the Collection, the Bronze example seen here is precisely in the condition it left the Paris Mint; yet, it merits only the grade of MS63RB.

(1776) Medal Libertas Americana AE 2005 Restrike MS63 PCGS #510009

As with the 2005 Silver Libertas Americana restrikes, the 2005 Bronze restrikes feature softened details and finely granular surfaces, these produced at a 47mm size from 57 grams of pure bronze. Like its Silver counterpart in the Collection, the Bronze example seen here is precisely in the condition it left the Paris Mint; yet, it merits only the grade of MS63RB.

(1776) Medal Libertas Americana AE 2005 Restrike MS64 PCGS #510009

As with the 2005 Silver Libertas Americana restrikes, the 2005 Bronze restrikes feature softened details and finely granular surfaces, these produced at a 47mm size from 57 grams of pure bronze. Like its Silver counterpart in the Collection, the Bronze example seen here is precisely in the condition it left the Paris Mint and the single finest known; yet, it merits only the grade of MS64RB.

(1776) Medal Libertas Americana AE 2005 Restrike MS64 PCGS #510009

As with the 2005 Silver Libertas Americana restrikes, the 2005 Bronze restrikes feature softened details and finely granular surfaces, these produced at a 47mm size from 57 grams of pure bronze. Like its Silver counterpart in the Collection, the Bronze example seen here is precisely in the condition it left the Paris Mint and the single finest known; yet, it merits only the grade of MS64RB.

(1776) Medal Libertas Am. Silver 2000 Restrike MS65 PCGS #510012

The Silver Restrike seen here was issued for the New Millenium in 2000 in a limited edition of 2500 pieces, each 45.86mm in diameter and containing 42.80 grams of .950 silver. For this issue, the Paris Mint used the same dies that had been used to produce the earlier Bronze restrikes sold to Mint visitors.

(1776) Medal Libertas Am. Silver 2000 Restrike MS65 PCGS #510012

The Silver Restrike seen here was issued for the New Millenium in 2000 in a limited edition of 2500 pieces, each 45.86mm in diameter and containing 42.80 grams of .950 silver. For this issue, the Paris Mint used the same dies that had been used to produce the earlier Bronze restrikes sold to Mint visitors.

(1776) Medal Libertas Americana Gold 2000 Restrike 64g. Au PR67DCAM PCGS #511938

As a companion to the 2000 Silver Restrike, the Paris Mint also issued a Restrike in Gold, as seen here. The Gold restrikes were produced at a diameter of 46.80mm, and contain 64 grams of .920 gold. Just 500 pieces were struck in gold, yet a careful examination shows that either 4 separate pairs of dies or 8 die states were used to complete their production. This is the #097 from the mintage.

(1776) Medal Libertas Americana 2004 Gold Restrike PR68DCAM PCGS #515264

The Gold Libertas Americana Medal restrikes issued in 2004 came from the same 40mm dies as the 2004 Silver restrikes, and were executed in Deep Cameo format as well. Containing 43 grams of .999 gold, the 2004 Gold restrikes are a bit smaller than those produced during 2000. These can be easily distinguished from their 2000 counterparts by the presence of the Paris Mint's markings near the lower rim of the reverse, something not seen on the 2000 restrikes. Like the DCAM silver restrikes, the 40mm size of these gold restrikes make them suitable for display in dual-coin holders, with both obverse and reverse presented side-by-side. Just 1776 gold restrikes were produced from these dies.

(1776) Medal Libertas Americana 2004 Gold Restrike PR68DCAM PCGS #515264

The Gold Libertas Americana Medal restrikes issued in 2004 came from the same 40mm dies as the 2004 Silver restrikes, and were executed in Deep Cameo format as well. Containing 43 grams of .999 gold, the 2004 Gold restrikes are a bit smaller than those produced during 2000. These can be easily distinguished from their 2000 counterparts by the presence of the Paris Mint's markings near the lower rim of the reverse, something not seen on the 2000 restrikes. Like the DCAM silver restrikes, the 40mm size of these gold restrikes make them suitable for display in dual-coin holders, with both obverse and reverse presented side-by-side. Just 1776 gold restrikes were produced from these dies.

(1776) Medal Libertas Americana 2004 Gold Restrike PR69DCAM PCGS #515264

The Gold Libertas Americana Medal restrikes issued in 2004 came from the same 40mm dies as the 2004 Silver restrikes, and were executed in Deep Cameo format as well. Containing 43 grams of .999 gold, the 2004 Gold restrikes are a bit smaller than those produced during 2000. These can be easily distinguished from their 2000 counterparts by the presence of the Paris Mint's markings near the lower rim of the reverse, something not seen on the 2000 restrikes. Like the DCAM silver restrikes, the 40mm size of these gold restrikes make them suitable for display in dual-coin holders, with both obverse and reverse presented side-by-side. Just 1776 gold restrikes were produced from these dies.

(1776) Medal Libertas Americana 2004 Gold Restrike PR69DCAM PCGS #515264

The Gold Libertas Americana Medal restrikes issued in 2004 came from the same 40mm dies as the 2004 Silver restrikes, and were executed in Deep Cameo format as well. Containing 43 grams of .999 gold, the 2004 Gold restrikes are a bit smaller than those produced during 2000. These can be easily distinguished from their 2000 counterparts by the presence of the Paris Mint's markings near the lower rim of the reverse, something not seen on the 2000 restrikes. Like the DCAM silver restrikes, the 40mm size of these gold restrikes make them suitable for display in dual-coin holders, with both obverse and reverse presented side-by-side. Just 1776 gold restrikes were produced from these dies.

(1776) Medal Libertas Americana 2004 Gold Restrike PR69DCAM PCGS #515264

The Gold Libertas Americana Medal restrikes issued in 2004 came from the same 40mm dies as the 2004 Silver restrikes, and were executed in Deep Cameo format as well. Containing 43 grams of .999 gold, the 2004 Gold restrikes are a bit smaller than those produced during 2000. These can be easily distinguished from their 2000 counterparts by the presence of the Paris Mint's markings near the lower rim of the reverse, something not seen on the 2000 restrikes. Like the DCAM silver restrikes, the 40mm size of these gold restrikes make them suitable for display in dual-coin holders, with both obverse and reverse presented side-by-side. Just 1776 gold restrikes were produced from these dies.

(1776) Medal Libertas Americana 2004 Gold Restrike PR70DCAM PCGS #515264

The Gold Libertas Americana Medal restrikes issued in 2004 came from the same 40mm dies as the 2004 Silver restrikes, and were executed in Deep Cameo format as well. Containing 43 grams of .999 gold, the 2004 Gold restrikes are a bit smaller than those produced during 2000. These can be easily distinguished from their 2000 counterparts by the presence of the Paris Mint's markings near the lower rim of the reverse, something not seen on the 2000 restrikes. Like the DCAM silver restrikes, the 40mm size was used for these gold restrikes. Just 1776 gold restrikes were produced from these dies. This is the single finest specimen, graded as PR70DCAM.

1945 Medal JK-AC-90 Bronze Annual Assay Commission SP65 PCGS #517775

With the Libertas Americana medal serving to commemorate the American victory in the Revolutionary War and the peace that followed, the U.S. Mint revisited that theme for the American victory in World War II in 1945 for its Annual Assay Commission medal. Here the Mint chose to make the medal a truly American commemoration, by replacing the reverse design with the Great Seal of the United States, as seen on Washington's Diplomatic Medal.

1945 Medal JK-AC-90 Bronze Annual Assay Commission SP65 PCGS #517775

With the Libertas Americana medal serving to commemorate the American victory in the Revolutionary War and the peace that followed, the U.S. Mint revisited that theme for the American victory in World War II in 1945 for its Annual Assay Commission medal. Here the Mint chose to make the medal a truly American commemoration, by replacing the reverse design with the Great Seal of the United States, as seen on Washington's Diplomatic Medal.

1945 Medal JK-AC-90 Bronze Annual Assay Commission SP66 PCGS #517775

With the Libertas Americana medal serving to commemorate the American victory in the Revolutionary War and the peace that followed, the U.S. Mint revisited that theme for the American victory in World War II in 1945 for its Annual Assay Commission medal. Here the Mint chose to make the medal a truly American commemoration, by replacing the reverse design with the Great Seal of the United States, as seen on Washington's Diplomatic Medal.

1945 Medal JK-AC-90 Bronze Annual Assay Commission SP66 PCGS #517775

With the Libertas Americana medal serving to commemorate the American victory in the Revolutionary War and the peace that followed, the U.S. Mint revisited that theme for the American victory in World War II in 1945 for its Annual Assay Commission medal. Here the Mint chose to make the medal a truly American commemoration, by replacing the reverse design with the Great Seal of the United States, as seen on Washington's Diplomatic Medal.

1983 Medal Libertas Am. Bronze Copy of Original Design MS68BN PCGS #518943

A further extension of First Coinvestors rights to the new 77mm Libertas dies, bronze "Copies" such as this one were struck in 1983 for the Bicentennial. Whereas the 1976 Silver "Copies" celebrated the bicentennial of the signing of the Declaration of Independence, these 1983 Medals were dated "1783 3 SEPT 1983", to commemorate the bicentennial of the signing of the Peace Treaty that ended the Revolutionary War.

1983 Medal Libertas Am. Bronze Copy of Original Design MS68BN PCGS #518943

A further extension of First Coinvestors rights to the new 77mm Libertas dies, bronze "Copies" such as this one were struck in 1983 for the Bicentennial. Whereas the 1976 Silver "Copies" celebrated the bicentennial of the signing of the Declaration of Independence, these 1983 Medals were dated "1783 3 SEPT 1983", to commemorate the bicentennial of the signing of the Peace Treaty that ended the Revolutionary War.

1783 Medal Libertas Americana Betts-608 White Metal SP61 PCGS #519404

The "Libertas Americana/Communi Consensu" medal is more commonly seen struck in "white metal" (tin), as seen here. To help preserve the white metal from corrosion, a small plug of copper was inserted in the planchet before striking, allowing the copper plug to absorb any corrosive agents and preserve the rest of the medal.

1783 Medal Libertas Americana Betts-608 White Metal SP61 PCGS #519404

The "Libertas Americana/Communi Consensu" medal is more commonly seen struck in "white metal" (tin), as seen here. To help preserve the white metal from corrosion, a small plug of copper was inserted in the planchet before striking, allowing the copper plug to absorb any corrosive agents and preserve the rest of the medal.

(1876) Token Pa-Ph 256 White Metal Lingg & Co. Mule w/Pa-Ph 258 Obv. MS64 PCGS #525249

For the United States Centennial celebration in 1876, the Libertas Americana design was once again brought into the spotlight, with the Lingg Brothers of Philadelphia producing their own 23mm Libertas die for patriotic medals and merchant tokens. Aside from its somewhat smaller size, this die is readily distinguished from Bolen's Libertas die by the orientation of Liberty's cap. On the Bolen die, the cap points to the "I" in Americana; whereas on the Lingg die, the cap points to the second "A". Like the Bolen die, the Lingg die was used to strike medals and tokens with an assortment of reverse dies in a variety of metals. All totalled, this Libertas Americana die was paired with 67 different reverse dies, resulting in 152 known die/metal combinations. Here we see the the Libertas Americana die paired with a Liberty Bell die, creating a patriotic medal purely in commemoration of the Centennial.

(1876) Token Pa-Ph 256 White Metal Lingg & Co. Mule w/Pa-Ph 258 Obv. MS64 PCGS #525249

For the United States Centennial celebration in 1876, the Libertas Americana design was once again brought into the spotlight, with the Lingg Brothers of Philadelphia producing their own 23mm Libertas die for patriotic medals and merchant tokens. Aside from its somewhat smaller size, this die is readily distinguished from Bolen's Libertas die by the orientation of Liberty's cap. On the Bolen die, the cap points to the "I" in Americana; whereas on the Lingg die, the cap points to the second "A". Like the Bolen die, the Lingg die was used to strike medals and tokens with an assortment of reverse dies in a variety of metals. All totalled, this Libertas Americana die was paired with 67 different reverse dies, resulting in 152 known die/metal combinations. Here we see the the Libertas Americana die paired with a Liberty Bell die, creating a patriotic medal purely in commemoration of the Centennial.

(1876) Token Pa-Ph 256 White Metal Lingg & Co. Mule w/Pa-Ph 258 Obv. MS65 PCGS #525249

For the United States Centennial celebration in 1876, the Libertas Americana design was once again brought into the spotlight, with the Lingg Brothers of Philadelphia producing their own 23mm Libertas die for patriotic medals and merchant tokens. Aside from its somewhat smaller size, this die is readily distinguished from Bolen's Libertas die by the orientation of Liberty's cap. On the Bolen die, the cap points to the "I" in Americana; whereas on the Lingg die, the cap points to the second "A". Like the Bolen die, the Lingg die was used to strike medals and tokens with an assortment of reverse dies in a variety of metals. All totaled, this Libertas Americana die was paired with 78 different reverse dies, resulting in 155 known die/metal combinations. Here we see the the Libertas Americana die paired with a Liberty Bell die, creating a patriotic medal purely in commemoration of the Centennial. Ex: Steve Tanenbaum

(1876) Token Pa-Ph 502 Brass Wood's Museum MS64 PCGS #525256

This advertising token for the Wood's Museum of Philadelphia features Bolen's Libertas Americana die in a scarce striking in Brass. Ex: Musante

(1876) Token Pa-Ph 502 Brass Wood's Museum MS64 PCGS #525256

This advertising token for the Wood's Museum of Philadelphia features Bolen's Libertas Americana die in a scarce striking in Brass. Ex: Musante

(1876) Token Pa-Ph 504 White Metal Wood's Museum MS64 PCGS #525257

With this specimen, we see Bolen's Libertas Americana die in its most widely produced medium -- struck in soft White Metal. Ex: Richard Crosby

(1876) Token Pa-Ph 504 White Metal Wood's Museum MS64 PCGS #525257

With this specimen, we see Bolen's Libertas Americana die in its most widely produced medium -- struck in soft White Metal. Ex: Richard Crosby

(1876) Token Pa-Ph 883 White Metal I.L. Cragin & Co. MS65 PCGS #525276

Late Die State, with noticeable breaks on obverse and reverse. Ex: John Kraljevich

(1876) Token Pa-Ph 970 White Metal Kelly's MS64 PCGS #525283

Ex: Richard Crosby and C&D Dale

(1876) Token Pa-Ph 970A Copper Kelly's MS64BN PCGS #525284

Ex: Richard Crosby and Van Omer

No Date Token Judd-391 Bronzed Lead Mule w/Libertas Americana MS64 PCGS #525294

A rare and peculiar piece, this token combines Bolen's Libertas Americana die with the J-319 3-Cent pattern die, produced in bronzed lead. Just 3 examples are known.

No Date Token Judd-391 Bronzed Lead Mule w/Libertas Americana MS64 PCGS #525294

A rare and peculiar piece, this token combines Bolen's Libertas Americana die with the J-319 3-Cent pattern die, produced in bronzed lead. Just 3 examples are known.

(1874) Medal Baker-56 Silver Libertas Americana MS64 PCGS #525295

Here we see not only one of the very rarest of the Bolen medals, but one of the very rarest of all patriotic medals: the Baker-56 Washington medal (AKA Bolen's JAB-M-4), combining Bolen's Libertas die with his portait of George Washington, with just six such medals struck in silver. This specimen traces its provenance to Neil Musante, the author of the definitive reference of the medallic work of John Adams Bolen.

(1874) Medal Baker-56 Silver Libertas Americana MS64 PCGS #525295

Here we see not only one of the very rarest of the Bolen medals, but one of the very rarest of all patriotic medals: the Baker-56 Washington medal (AKA Bolen's JAB-M-4), combining Bolen's Libertas die with his portait of George Washington, with just six such medals struck in silver. This specimen traces its provenance to Neil Musante, the author of the definitive reference of the medallic work of John Adams Bolen.

(1867) Token Ma-Sp 43 Copper J.A. Bolen MS63RB PCGS #525297

In the Post-Civil War era, as the once-divided country began to reunite in national patriotism, the image of the Libertas Americana medal again ascended as a national emblem. Medalist and Die Sinker John Adams Bolen created a 25mm die with the Libertas Americana design, to be used for patriotic medals and merchant tokens. Ultimately, this die was paired with 12 different reverse dies, resulting in 12 distinct die varieties. These pieces are all scarce to rare, and may be seen struck in silver, copper, bronze, brass and white metal. Considering the different metals that were used for production, there are a total of 32 die/metal combinations bearing Bolen's Libertas Americana obverse. As seen here, John Adams Bolen chose his Libertas Americana die to use with his own portrait medal -- with this specimen being one of just 16 examples struck in copper.

(1867) Token Ma-Sp 43 Copper J.A. Bolen MS63RB PCGS #525297

In the Post-Civil War era, as the once-divided country began to reunite in national patriotism, the image of the Libertas Americana medal again ascended as a national emblem. Medalist and Die Sinker John Adams Bolen created a 25mm die with the Libertas Americana design, to be used for patriotic medals and merchant tokens. Ultimately, this die was paired with 12 different reverse dies, resulting in 12 distinct die varieties. These pieces are all scarce to rare, and may be seen struck in silver, copper, bronze, brass and white metal. Considering the different metals that were used for production, there are a total of 32 die/metal combinations bearing Bolen's Libertas Americana obverse. As seen here, John Adams Bolen chose his Libertas Americana die to use with his own portrait medal -- with this specimen being one of just 16 examples struck in copper.

(1867) Token Ma-Sp 43 Copper J.A. Bolen MS66RB PCGS #525297

In the Post-Civil War era, as the once-divided country began to reunite in national patriotism, the image of the Libertas Americana medal again ascended as a national emblem. Medalist and Die Sinker John Adams Bolen created a 25mm die with the Libertas Americana design, to be used for patriotic medals and merchant tokens. Ultimately, this die was paired with 12 different reverse dies, resulting in 12 distinct die varieties. These pieces are all scarce to rare, and may be seen struck in silver, copper, bronze, brass and white metal. Considering the different metals that were used for production, there are a total of 32 die/metal combinations bearing Bolen's Libertas Americana obverse. As seen here, John Adams Bolen chose his Libertas Americana die to use with his own portrait medal -- with this specimen being one of just 16 examples struck in copper. Ex: Don Miller, Charles Litman and Steve Tanenbaum.

(1867) Token Ma-Sp 43 Copper J.A. Bolen MS66RB PCGS #525297

In the Post-Civil War era, as the once-divided country began to reunite in national patriotism, the image of the Libertas Americana medal again ascended as a national emblem. Medalist and Die Sinker John Adams Bolen created a 25mm die with the Libertas Americana design, to be used for patriotic medals and merchant tokens. Ultimately, this die was paired with 12 different reverse dies, resulting in 12 distinct die varieties. These pieces are all scarce to rare, and may be seen struck in silver, copper, bronze, brass and white metal. Considering the different metals that were used for production, there are a total of 32 die/metal combinations bearing Bolen's Libertas Americana obverse. As seen here, John Adams Bolen chose his Libertas Americana die to use with his own portrait medal -- with this specimen being one of just 16 examples struck in copper. Ex: Don Miller, Charles Litman and Steve Tanenbaum.

(1876) Token NY-NY 700 White Metal Dean Cakes MS64 PCGS #525300

One of the more available New York City store tokens, this one from the collections of David Schenkman and Steve Tanenbaum.

(1876) Token NY-NY 709B Brass Dean Cakes MS63 PCGS #525302

A rare brass striking of the Dean Cakes store card, with this one coming from the collections of FCC Boyd, John J. Ford and Steve Tanenbaum.

(1876) Token NY-NY 720 White Metal Frederick's Pharmacy MS64 PCGS #525303

Ex: FCC Boyd, John J. Ford and Steve Tanenbaum

(1876) Token NY-NY 720A Copper Frederick's Pharmacy MS65RB PCGS #525305

A wonderful red-brown copper store card, Ex: Robert Williams and Steve Tanenbaum

(1876) Token NY-NY 720AA Bronze Frederick's Pharmacy MS65BN PCGS #525307

With this Lingg token produced for Fredericks Pharmacy of New York, we see the 23mm Libertas die in its scarcest format -- struck in Bronze. Ex: Max M Schwart, David E. Schenkman, and Steve Tanenbaum.

(1876) Token NY-NY 720AA Bronze Frederick's Pharmacy MS65BN PCGS #525307

With this Lingg token produced for Fredericks Pharmacy of New York, we see the 23mm Libertas die in its scarcest format -- struck in Bronze. Ex: Max M Schwart, David E. Schenkman, and Steve Tanenbaum.

(1876) Token NY-NY 720B Brass Frederick's Pharmacy MS64 PCGS #525310

Ex: FCC Boyd, John J. Ford and Steve Tanenbaum.

(1876) Token NY-NY 732 Brass Great Union Pacific Tea Co. MS64 PCGS #525311

Ex: Max M Schwartz, PCAC, Ray Bryne, David E. Schenkman and Steve Tanenbaum

(1876) Token NY-NY 732A Copper Great Union Pacific Tea Co. MS63RB PCGS #525313

Ex: Max M Schwartz, HJ Levine, Ray Bryne, David E. Schenkman and Steve Tanenbaum

(1876) Token NY-NY 732B White Metal Great Union Pacific Tea Co. MS62 PCGS #525315

Ex: Max M Schwartz, HJ Levine, Ray Bryne, David E. Schenkman and Steve Tanenbaum

(1876) Token NY-NY 736 White Metal Great Union Pacific Tea Co. MS63 PCGS #525316

Ex: Max M Schwartz, HJ Levine, Ray Bryne, David E. Schenkman and Steve Tanenbaum

(1876) Token NY-NY 740 White Metal T. Hoag MS65 PCGS #525317

White metal strikings of the various merchant tokens are the most commonly seen, and decidedly the most common of the Libertas Americana tokens. White metal is quite soft and easily impressed by the dies, and this sometimes results in a highly reflective prooflike surface -- as seen here with the Libertas token for T. Hoag Watches of New York. Ex: Donald Schram and Steve Tanenbaum

(1876) Token NY-NY 740 White Metal T. Hoag MS65 PCGS #525317

White metal strikings of the various merchant tokens are the most commonly seen, and decidedly the most common of the Libertas Americana tokens. White metal is quite soft and easily impressed by the dies, and this sometimes results in a highly reflective prooflike surface -- as seen here with the Libertas token for T. Hoag Watches of New York. Ex: Donald Schram and Steve Tanenbaum

(1876) Token NY-NY 740A Copper T. Hoag N1BN PCGS #525318

Ex: Lionel L. Rudduck and Steve Tanenbaum

(1876) Token NY-NY 740B Brass T. Hoag MS64 PCGS #525324

Ex: Lionel L. Rudduck and Steve Tanenbaum

(1876) Token NY-NY 750 White Metal H.W. Hoops MS65 PCGS #525327

Ex: Herbert Bardes and Steve Tanenbaum

(1876) Token NY-NY 760 White Metal Huyler's MS65 PCGS #525328

Ex: Donald Schram and Steve Tanenbaum

(1876) Token NY-NY 770 White Metal William R. Jenkins MS63 PCGS #525330

Ex: FCC Boyd, John J. Ford and Steve Tanenbaum

(1876) Token NY-NY 780 White Metal Geo. E. Phelan MS64 PCGS #525331

Ex: FCC Boyd, John J. Ford and Steve Tanenbaum

(1876) Token NY-NY 780A Copper Geo. E. Phelan MS65RD PCGS #525335

Apart from the patriotic medals, the Lingg Brothers used their Libertas Americana die in commerical production, creating advertising tokens for numerous merchants. Here we see the Geo. E. Phelan merchant token struck in copper, and still fully Mint Red! Ex: Max M. Schwartz, David E. Schenkman and Steve Tanenbaum

(1876) Token NY-NY 780A Copper Geo. E. Phelan MS65RD PCGS #525335

Apart from the patriotic medals, the Lingg Brothers used their Libertas Americana die in commerical production, creating advertising tokens for numerous merchants. Here we see the Geo. E. Phelan merchant token struck in copper, and still fully Mint Red! Ex: Max M. Schwartz, David E. Schenkman and Steve Tanenbaum

(1876) Token NY-NY 780B Brass Geo. E. Phelan MS63 PCGS #525336

Ex: Max M. Schwartz, David E. Schenkman and Steve Tanenbaum

(1876) Token NY-NY 790 White Metal W. Pimmel MS64 PCGS #525337

Ex: Springfield Library and Museum, and Steve Tanenbaum

(1876) Token NY-NY 800 White Metal Pruden's MS64 PCGS #525338

Ex: Max M. Schwartz, David E. Schenkman and Steve Tanenbaum

(1876) Token NY-NY 800A Copper Pruden's MS64RB PCGS #525343

Ex: FCC Boyd, John J. Ford and Steve Tanenbaum

(1876) Token NY-NY 800B Brass Pruden's MS64 PCGS #525358

Ex: FCC Boyd, John J. Ford and Steve Tanenbaum

(1876) Token NY-NY 810 White Metal Geo. P. Rowell & Co. MS63 PCGS #525361

Ex: Max M. Schwartz, David E. Schenkman and Steve Tanenbaum

(1876) Token NY-NY 810A Brass Geo. P. Rowell & Co. MS65 PCGS #525364

This merchant token was produced for the Geo. P. Rowell & Co. Newspaper company of New York. While these Rowell tokens are fairly available in the common "white metal" (tin), they are truly rare in the Brass composition seen here. Indeed, this particular specimen has been highly prized for generations, having been featured in the collections of FCC Boyd, John J. Ford, and Stephen Tanenbaum.

(1876) Token NY-NY 810A Brass Geo. P. Rowell & Co. MS65 PCGS #525364

This merchant token was produced for the Geo. P. Rowell & Co. Newspaper company of New York. While these Rowell tokens are fairly available in the common "white metal" (tin), they are truly rare in the Brass composition seen here. Indeed, this particular specimen has been highly prized for generations, having been featured in the collections of FCC Boyd, John J. Ford, and Stephen Tanenbaum.

(1876) Token NY-NY 830A Copper J.W. Scott & Co. MS64RB PCGS #525379

Ex: FCC Boyd, John J. Ford and Steve Tanenbaum

(1876) Token NY-NY 830B Brass J.W. Scott & Co. MS63 PCGS #525381

Ex: FCC Boyd, John J. Ford and Steve Tanenbaum

(1876) Token NY-NY 850A Brass Traphagen, Hunter & Co. MS64 PCGS #525383

Ex: FCC Boyd, John J. Ford and Steve Tanenbaum

(1876) Token NY-NY 860 White Metal Traphagen, Hunter & Co. AU58 PCGS #525384

The third known Libertas Americana token obverse die is seen here. An odd rarity among the Libertas Americana tokens, this obverse die displays a very uniform denticulated border, but a rather crude portrait of Liberty. One might call this the "apprentice die," as it appears to have been made by someone still learning their craft. Raised guidelines can been seen framing the denticulation and legend, to ensure their proper placement and uniformity, but it would seem that the portrait was executed freehand. This third Libertas obverse die is only known in combination with this particular Traphagen Hunter reverse die, and is seen only in white metal and brass. Ex: Max M. Schwartz, David E. Schenkman and Steve Tanenbaum

(1876) Token NY-NY 860 White Metal Traphagen, Hunter & Co. AU58 PCGS #525384

The third known Libertas Americana token obverse die is seen here. An odd rarity among the Libertas Americana tokens, this obverse die displays a very uniform denticulated border, but a rather crude portrait of Liberty. One might call this the "apprentice die," as it appears to have been made by someone still learning their craft. Raised guidelines can been seen framing the denticulation and legend, to ensure their proper placement and uniformity, but it would seem that the portrait was executed freehand. This third Libertas obverse die is only known in combination with this particular Traphagen Hunter reverse die, and is seen only in white metal and brass. Ex: Max M. Schwartz, David E. Schenkman and Steve Tanenbaum

(1876) Token NY-NY 860J Brass Traphagen, Hunter & Co. MS63 PCGS #525385

Here again is the "apprentice" die of the Libertas Americana token, this time seen in its rarest composition in Brass. With its provenance tracing to Stephen Tanenbaum, this specimen is the sole known brass striking of the token.

(1876) Token NY-NY 860J Brass Traphagen, Hunter & Co. MS63 PCGS #525385

Here again is the "apprentice" die of the Libertas Americana token, this time seen in its rarest composition in Brass. With its provenance tracing to Stephen Tanenbaum, this specimen is the sole known brass striking of the token.