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1851-O G$1 MS63 PCGS #7516

Variety 1, with die crack at star at 1:00. Rarity 5th of 6 per Douglas Winter's book.

1851-O G$1 MS63 PCGS #7516

Variety 1, with die crack at star at 1:00. Rarity 5th of 6 per Douglas Winter's book.

1851-O G$1 MS63 PCGS #7516

Variety 1, with die crack at star at 1:00. Rarity 5th of 6 per Douglas Winter's book.

1858-S G$1 AU55 PCGS #7550

The Official Red Book "Guide Book Of Gold Dollars" by Q. David Bowers (2011) states that 1858-S circulated grade is "Typically encountered in VF grade, sometimes EF, but rarely AU." This seems inconsistent with population figures from PCGS and NGC which shows the population in AU55 and AU58 far exceeding the population in EF and lower grades combined.

1858-S G$1 AU55 PCGS #7550

The Official Red Book "Guide Book Of Gold Dollars" by Q. David Bowers (2011) states that 1858-S circulated grade is "Typically encountered in VF grade, sometimes EF, but rarely AU." This seems inconsistent with population figures from PCGS and NGC which shows the population in AU55 and AU58 far exceeding the population in EF and lower grades combined.

1862 G$1 MS64 PCGS #7560

Very Rare Doubled Date. Research to date 4/6/2021; I have examined 582 photos from various sources (auction house photos, third party grading service websites [PCGS/NGC/ANACS], Ebay, dealer photos, etc.) and found only 3 photos showing the double date variety. ANACS lists the variety whereas PCGS and NGC do not. ANACS only lists 4 known graded pieces (1 ea, XF40, XF45, AU55 and AU58) of which I have located 2 photos, the AU58 and the XF40. The third photo is that shown above an MS64. ANACS was not able to furnish the serial numbers of the other two pieces. The data I have is on an Excel spreadsheet and duplicate serial numbers have been removed so that the photos I examined are discrete entities. There is, however, still the possibility of duplicate coins due to resubmissions, although I believe the number is small in comparison to the aggregate total. 12/11/20 Research update. I have expanded my net to include 11 auction houses, dealers and grading houses with detail photos and to date have examined 570 graded photos XF40 to MS67 (Damaged, detail, and coins with blurry photos or without serial numbers have been excluded from my research). I have found photos of two of the four ANACS coins (XF40 and AU58) but have not found any other Double Date coins. {I also found a total of nine Double Die Obverse coins (two of which were not identified as such). 44 DDO coins are currently listed on the PCGS, NGC and ANACS websites.} I can only confirm the existence of three Breen 6073 double date coins, the two ANACS coins and the coin listed here. [10/27/20 Research to date, I have only found references to 4 other Doubled Date (Breen 6073) 1862 Gold Dollars, none grading over AU58. ANACS is the only third party grader that currently recognizes this variety and has graded a single coin in each XF40, XF45, AU55 and AU58. Presently, I have looked at MS60-MS67 graded coins (PCGS,NGC,ANACS,IGC) - 400+ photos - from 3 auction houses dating back to 2007 and not found another mint state Doubled Date coin. (Photos prior to 2007 lack the quality to distinguish details of the date).] Q.David Bowers' "A Guide Book of Gold Dollars" and Garrett and Guth's "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933", make reference to the Doubled Date and the Double Die Obverse as interesting varieties, yet nothing beyond the fact that they exist. "Walter Breens' Complete Encyclopedia Of U.S. And Colonial Coins" states the coin is, "Very rare. Date first punched too high, then corrected lower." Pedigree; Maurice Storck Collection.

1862 G$1 MS64 PCGS #7560

Very Rare Doubled Date. Research to date 4/6/2021; I have examined 582 photos from various sources (auction house photos, third party grading service websites [PCGS/NGC/ANACS], Ebay, dealer photos, etc.) and found only 3 photos showing the double date variety. ANACS lists the variety whereas PCGS and NGC do not. ANACS only lists 4 known graded pieces (1 ea, XF40, XF45, AU55 and AU58) of which I have located 2 photos, the AU58 and the XF40. The third photo is that shown above an MS64. ANACS was not able to furnish the serial numbers of the other two pieces. The data I have is on an Excel spreadsheet and duplicate serial numbers have been removed so that the photos I examined are discrete entities. There is, however, still the possibility of duplicate coins due to resubmissions, although I believe the number is small in comparison to the aggregate total. 12/11/20 Research update. I have expanded my net to include 11 auction houses, dealers and grading houses with detail photos and to date have examined 570 graded photos XF40 to MS67 (Damaged, detail, and coins with blurry photos or without serial numbers have been excluded from my research). I have found photos of two of the four ANACS coins (XF40 and AU58) but have not found any other Double Date coins. {I also found a total of nine Double Die Obverse coins (two of which were not identified as such). 44 DDO coins are currently listed on the PCGS, NGC and ANACS websites.} I can only confirm the existence of three Breen 6073 double date coins, the two ANACS coins and the coin listed here. [10/27/20 Research to date, I have only found references to 4 other Doubled Date (Breen 6073) 1862 Gold Dollars, none grading over AU58. ANACS is the only third party grader that currently recognizes this variety and has graded a single coin in each XF40, XF45, AU55 and AU58. Presently, I have looked at MS60-MS67 graded coins (PCGS,NGC,ANACS,IGC) - 400+ photos - from 3 auction houses dating back to 2007 and not found another mint state Doubled Date coin. (Photos prior to 2007 lack the quality to distinguish details of the date).] Q.David Bowers' "A Guide Book of Gold Dollars" and Garrett and Guth's "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933", make reference to the Doubled Date and the Double Die Obverse as interesting varieties, yet nothing beyond the fact that they exist. "Walter Breens' Complete Encyclopedia Of U.S. And Colonial Coins" states the coin is, "Very rare. Date first punched too high, then corrected lower." Pedigree; Maurice Storck Collection.

1862 G$1 MS64 PCGS #7560

Very Rare Doubled Date. Research to date 4/6/2021; I have examined 582 photos from various sources (auction house photos, third party grading service websites [PCGS/NGC/ANACS], Ebay, dealer photos, etc.) and found only 3 photos showing the double date variety. ANACS lists the variety whereas PCGS and NGC do not. ANACS only lists 4 known graded pieces (1 ea, XF40, XF45, AU55 and AU58) of which I have located 2 photos, the AU58 and the XF40. The third photo is that shown above an MS64. ANACS was not able to furnish the serial numbers of the other two pieces. The data I have is on an Excel spreadsheet and duplicate serial numbers have been removed so that the photos I examined are discrete entities. There is, however, still the possibility of duplicate coins due to resubmissions, although I believe the number is small in comparison to the aggregate total. 12/11/20 Research update. I have expanded my net to include 11 auction houses, dealers and grading houses with detail photos and to date have examined 570 graded photos XF40 to MS67 (Damaged, detail, and coins with blurry photos or without serial numbers have been excluded from my research). I have found photos of two of the four ANACS coins (XF40 and AU58) but have not found any other Double Date coins. {I also found a total of nine Double Die Obverse coins (two of which were not identified as such). 44 DDO coins are currently listed on the PCGS, NGC and ANACS websites.} I can only confirm the existence of three Breen 6073 double date coins, the two ANACS coins and the coin listed here. [10/27/20 Research to date, I have only found references to 4 other Doubled Date (Breen 6073) 1862 Gold Dollars, none grading over AU58. ANACS is the only third party grader that currently recognizes this variety and has graded a single coin in each XF40, XF45, AU55 and AU58. Presently, I have looked at MS60-MS67 graded coins (PCGS,NGC,ANACS,IGC) - 400+ photos - from 3 auction houses dating back to 2007 and not found another mint state Doubled Date coin. (Photos prior to 2007 lack the quality to distinguish details of the date).] Q.David Bowers' "A Guide Book of Gold Dollars" and Garrett and Guth's "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933", make reference to the Doubled Date and the Double Die Obverse as interesting varieties, yet nothing beyond the fact that they exist. "Walter Breens' Complete Encyclopedia Of U.S. And Colonial Coins" states the coin is, "Very rare. Date first punched too high, then corrected lower." Pedigree; Maurice Storck Collection.

1862 G$1 MS64 PCGS #7560

Very Rare Doubled Date. Research to date 4/6/2021; I have examined 582 photos from various sources (auction house photos, third party grading service websites [PCGS/NGC/ANACS], Ebay, dealer photos, etc.) and found only 3 photos showing the double date variety. ANACS lists the variety whereas PCGS and NGC do not. ANACS only lists 4 known graded pieces (1 ea, XF40, XF45, AU55 and AU58) of which I have located 2 photos, the AU58 and the XF40. The third photo is that shown above an MS64. ANACS was not able to furnish the serial numbers of the other two pieces. The data I have is on an Excel spreadsheet and duplicate serial numbers have been removed so that the photos I examined are discrete entities. There is, however, still the possibility of duplicate coins due to resubmissions, although I believe the number is small in comparison to the aggregate total. 12/11/20 Research update. I have expanded my net to include 11 auction houses, dealers and grading houses with detail photos and to date have examined 570 graded photos XF40 to MS67 (Damaged, detail, and coins with blurry photos or without serial numbers have been excluded from my research). I have found photos of two of the four ANACS coins (XF40 and AU58) but have not found any other Double Date coins. {I also found a total of nine Double Die Obverse coins (two of which were not identified as such). 44 DDO coins are currently listed on the PCGS, NGC and ANACS websites.} I can only confirm the existence of three Breen 6073 double date coins, the two ANACS coins and the coin listed here. [10/27/20 Research to date, I have only found references to 4 other Doubled Date (Breen 6073) 1862 Gold Dollars, none grading over AU58. ANACS is the only third party grader that currently recognizes this variety and has graded a single coin in each XF40, XF45, AU55 and AU58. Presently, I have looked at MS60-MS67 graded coins (PCGS,NGC,ANACS,IGC) - 400+ photos - from 3 auction houses dating back to 2007 and not found another mint state Doubled Date coin. (Photos prior to 2007 lack the quality to distinguish details of the date).] Q.David Bowers' "A Guide Book of Gold Dollars" and Garrett and Guth's "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933", make reference to the Doubled Date and the Double Die Obverse as interesting varieties, yet nothing beyond the fact that they exist. "Walter Breens' Complete Encyclopedia Of U.S. And Colonial Coins" states the coin is, "Very rare. Date first punched too high, then corrected lower." Pedigree; Maurice Storck Collection.

1866 G$1 MS61 PCGS #7565

No die clashes.

1866 G$1 MS61 PCGS #7565

No die clashes.

1866 G$1 MS61 PCGS #7565

No die clashes.

1881 G$1 MS65 PCGS #7582

The 88 is re-punched which is common. Pedigree: Maurice Storck Collection (2020)

1881 G$1 MS65 PCGS #7582

The 88 is re-punched which is common. Pedigree: Maurice Storck Collection (2020)

1881 G$1 MS65 PCGS #7582

The 88 is re-punched which is common. Pedigree: Maurice Storck Collection (2020)

1881 G$1 MS65 PCGS #7582

The 88 is re-punched which is common. Pedigree: Maurice Storck Collection (2020)

1887 G$1 MS65 PCGS #7588

OGH. Crisp strike with "Longacre doubling" on the reverse.

1887 G$1 MS65 PCGS #7588

OGH. Crisp strike with "Longacre doubling" on the reverse.

1835 $2.50 AU55 PCGS #7693

Borckardt Variety 6, R2. Obverse - low date with 5 left of curl, LIBERTY shows signs of re-punching. Reverse - A M widely spaced with A close to wing.

1835 $2.50 AU55 PCGS #7693

Borckardt Variety 6, R2. Obverse - low date with 5 left of curl, LIBERTY shows signs of re-punching. Reverse - A M widely spaced with A close to wing.

1839-O $2.50 AU50 PCGS #7701

Borckardt variety 28, Winter variety 2-B. This is the scarcer of the two varieties known (1/3 of population per Borckardt). Obverse - Low date, 9 closer to rim than curl, 3 and 9 show signs of re-punching, mint mark is left of center of 3. Many of the stars show signs of having been re-cut. Reverse - Medalic alignment, 1 and 2 touch fraction bar, berry is present but disconnected from branch, misshapen arrow heads. Later die state showing die crack running from rim at N in UNITED to rim at R in AMERICA. Also a light die crack is seen at right wing tip to the back of the eagle's head. Some of the vertical shield lines extend up into the horizontal lines, they also extend below the shield into the arrow fletching. The coin is very bright (signs of conservation / dipping) with luster limited to the protected areas (stars and legend). Very hard to photograph. The photos, both mine and PCGS's, don't do the coin justice.

1839-O $2.50 AU50 PCGS #7701

Borckardt variety 28, Winter variety 2-B. This is the scarcer of the two varieties known (1/3 of population per Borckardt). Obverse - Low date, 9 closer to rim than curl, 3 and 9 show signs of re-punching, mint mark is left of center of 3. Many of the stars show signs of having been re-cut. Reverse - Medalic alignment, 1 and 2 touch fraction bar, berry is present but disconnected from branch, misshapen arrow heads. Later die state showing die crack running from rim at N in UNITED to rim at R in AMERICA. Also a light die crack is seen at right wing tip to the back of the eagle's head. Some of the vertical shield lines extend up into the horizontal lines, they also extend below the shield into the arrow fletching. The coin is very bright (signs of conservation / dipping) with luster limited to the protected areas (stars and legend). Very hard to photograph. The photos, both mine and PCGS's, don't do the coin justice.

1839-O $2.50 AU50 PCGS #7701

Borckardt variety 28, Winter variety 2-B. This is the scarcer of the two varieties known (1/3 of population per Borckardt). Obverse - Low date, 9 closer to rim than curl, 3 and 9 show signs of re-punching, mint mark is left of center of 3. Many of the stars show signs of having been re-cut. Reverse - Medalic alignment, 1 and 2 touch fraction bar, berry is present but disconnected from branch, misshapen arrow heads. Later die state showing die crack running from rim at N in UNITED to rim at R in AMERICA. Also a light die crack is seen at right wing tip to the back of the eagle's head. Some of the vertical shield lines extend up into the horizontal lines, they also extend below the shield into the arrow fletching. The coin is very bright (signs of conservation / dipping) with luster limited to the protected areas (stars and legend). Very hard to photograph. The photos, both mine and PCGS's, don't do the coin justice.

1839-O $2.50 AU50 PCGS #7701

Borckardt variety 28, Winter variety 2-B. This is the scarcer of the two varieties known (1/3 of population per Borckardt). Obverse - Low date, 9 closer to rim than curl, 3 and 9 show signs of re-punching, mint mark is left of center of 3. Many of the stars show signs of having been re-cut. Reverse - Medalic alignment, 1 and 2 touch fraction bar, berry is present but disconnected from branch, misshapen arrow heads. Later die state showing die crack running from rim at N in UNITED to rim at R in AMERICA. Also a light die crack is seen at right wing tip to the back of the eagle's head. Some of the vertical shield lines extend up into the horizontal lines, they also extend below the shield into the arrow fletching. The coin is very bright (signs of conservation / dipping) with luster limited to the protected areas (stars and legend). Very hard to photograph. The photos, both mine and PCGS's, don't do the coin justice.

1839-O $2.50 AU50 PCGS #7701

Borckardt variety 28, Winter variety 2-B. This is the scarcer of the two varieties known (1/3 of population per Borckardt). Obverse - Low date, 9 closer to rim than curl, 3 and 9 show signs of re-punching, mint mark is left of center of 3. Many of the stars show signs of having been re-cut. Reverse - Medalic alignment, 1 and 2 touch fraction bar, berry is present but disconnected from branch, misshapen arrow heads. Later die state showing die crack running from rim at N in UNITED to rim at R in AMERICA. Also a light die crack is seen at right wing tip to the back of the eagle's head. Some of the vertical shield lines extend up into the horizontal lines, they also extend below the shield into the arrow fletching. The coin is very bright (signs of conservation / dipping) with luster limited to the protected areas (stars and legend). Very hard to photograph. The photos, both mine and PCGS's, don't do the coin justice.

1840 $2.50 AU50 PCGS #7717

Per the "Encyclopedia Of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933" by Garrett and Guth, "The year 1840 is the first year of issue for the Liberty Head quarter eagle design by Christian Gobrecht. Today this date is quite popular for that reason. Surprisingly, these coins were not saved in significant quantities at the time of issue... Most coins seen are poorly struck in the center, with light die breaks sometimes encountered." The strike is also noted by David Akers in his "United States Gold Coins - An Analysis Of Auction Records - Volume II - Quarter Eagles". He states, "Always flatly struck on the head of Liberty, the stars, and on the eagle. Much more rare than the standard references and even the low mintage would indicate, particularly in grades above EF... Very underrated." Walter Breen's monograph "New Varieties Of $1, $2.50 and $5.00 United States Gold", suggests the "Broken die state is very rare." What has not been detailed by any of the authors is that the "broken die state" reverse coins also have a different obverse. The date is in a slightly different location (the 1 is left of center of a dentil versus right) and the 18 is thicker than the normal date. Also the 40 in the date is re-punched with the initial punch high and corrected lower. This can be seen between the crosslet and serif in the 4 and in the lower portion of the 0. Reference, PCGS s/n 83921274 (MS63+) and 37305318 (MS62).

1840 $2.50 AU50 PCGS #7717

Per the "Encyclopedia Of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933" by Garrett and Guth, "The year 1840 is the first year of issue for the Liberty Head quarter eagle design by Christian Gobrecht. Today this date is quite popular for that reason. Surprisingly, these coins were not saved in significant quantities at the time of issue... Most coins seen are poorly struck in the center, with light die breaks sometimes encountered." The strike is also noted by David Akers in his "United States Gold Coins - An Analysis Of Auction Records - Volume II - Quarter Eagles". He states, "Always flatly struck on the head of Liberty, the stars, and on the eagle. Much more rare than the standard references and even the low mintage would indicate, particularly in grades above EF... Very underrated." Walter Breen's monograph "New Varieties Of $1, $2.50 and $5.00 United States Gold", suggests the "Broken die state is very rare." What has not been detailed by any of the authors is that the "broken die state" reverse coins also have a different obverse. The date is in a slightly different location (the 1 is left of center of a dentil versus right) and the 18 is thicker than the normal date. Also the 40 in the date is re-punched with the initial punch high and corrected lower. This can be seen between the crosslet and serif in the 4 and in the lower portion of the 0. Reference, PCGS s/n 83921274 (MS63+) and 37305318 (MS62).

1840 $2.50 AU50 PCGS #7717

Per the "Encyclopedia Of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933" by Garrett and Guth, "The year 1840 is the first year of issue for the Liberty Head quarter eagle design by Christian Gobrecht. Today this date is quite popular for that reason. Surprisingly, these coins were not saved in significant quantities at the time of issue... Most coins seen are poorly struck in the center, with light die breaks sometimes encountered." The strike is also noted by David Akers in his "United States Gold Coins - An Analysis Of Auction Records - Volume II - Quarter Eagles". He states, "Always flatly struck on the head of Liberty, the stars, and on the eagle. Much more rare than the standard references and even the low mintage would indicate, particularly in grades above EF... Very underrated." Walter Breen's monograph "New Varieties Of $1, $2.50 and $5.00 United States Gold", suggests the "Broken die state is very rare." What has not been detailed by any of the authors is that the "broken die state" reverse coins also have a different obverse. The date is in a slightly different location (the 1 is left of center of a dentil versus right) and the 18 is thicker than the normal date. Also the 40 in the date is re-punched with the initial punch high and corrected lower. This can be seen between the crosslet and serif in the 4 and in the lower portion of the 0. Reference, PCGS s/n 83921274 (MS63+) and 37305318 (MS62).

1840 $2.50 AU50 PCGS #7717

Per the "Encyclopedia Of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933" by Garrett and Guth, "The year 1840 is the first year of issue for the Liberty Head quarter eagle design by Christian Gobrecht. Today this date is quite popular for that reason. Surprisingly, these coins were not saved in significant quantities at the time of issue... Most coins seen are poorly struck in the center, with light die breaks sometimes encountered." The strike is also noted by David Akers in his "United States Gold Coins - An Analysis Of Auction Records - Volume II - Quarter Eagles". He states, "Always flatly struck on the head of Liberty, the stars, and on the eagle. Much more rare than the standard references and even the low mintage would indicate, particularly in grades above EF... Very underrated." Walter Breen's monograph "New Varieties Of $1, $2.50 and $5.00 United States Gold", suggests the "Broken die state is very rare." What has not been detailed by any of the authors is that the "broken die state" reverse coins also have a different obverse. The date is in a slightly different location (the 1 is left of center of a dentil versus right) and the 18 is thicker than the normal date. Also the 40 in the date is re-punched with the initial punch high and corrected lower. This can be seen between the crosslet and serif in the 4 and in the lower portion of the 0. Reference, PCGS s/n 83921274 (MS63+) and 37305318 (MS62).

1842 $2.50 AU50 PCGS #7723

Rare (50-60 known per PCGS). As Garrett and Guth state in their "Encyclopedia Of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933", "As the tiny mintage suggests, the 1842 Liberty Head quarter eagle is a major rarity in any grade...A review of other auction records reveals that this date is seldom offered for sale in any grade... The 1842 quarter eagle is still very rare, much more so than many of the more popular Southern mint issues." David Akers' "An Analysis Of Auction Records - Volume II - Quarter Eagles" his average grade at the time (1975) was VF29.

1842 $2.50 AU50 PCGS #7723

Rare (50-60 known per PCGS). As Garrett and Guth state in their "Encyclopedia Of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933", "As the tiny mintage suggests, the 1842 Liberty Head quarter eagle is a major rarity in any grade...A review of other auction records reveals that this date is seldom offered for sale in any grade... The 1842 quarter eagle is still very rare, much more so than many of the more popular Southern mint issues." David Akers' "An Analysis Of Auction Records - Volume II - Quarter Eagles" his average grade at the time (1975) was VF29.

1843-O $2.50 Small Date MS61 PCGS #7731

NGC 4882981-003. This is a rare transition coin variety using the obverse of the small date (Winter's small date obverse 1) with the large date reverse (Winter's large date reverse A) showing the double punched mint mark. It was sold as a variety 8 although it currently does not show-up in Douglas Winter's "Gold Coins Of The New Orleans Mint" 3rd edition. The reverse is very sharply struck and also shows the vertical shield lines extending into the horizontal lines along with the double punched mint mark. Walter Breen in his "Complete Encyclopedia Of U.S. And Colonial Coins" describes the 6172 variety - "Stars thin, attenuated; either the hub was weakly impressed, or obv. die was reground. Rev. as next [Large Date], base of mintmark repunched." My belief is that the die was lapped in an attempt to extend its life as the main portrait shows a rough finish often attributed to a rusty die especially at the hair and LIBERTY. There are also 2 rust lumps evident at the jaw/neck transition.

1843-O $2.50 Small Date MS61 PCGS #7731

NGC 4882981-003. This is a rare transition coin variety using the obverse of the small date (Winter's small date obverse 1) with the large date reverse (Winter's large date reverse A) showing the double punched mint mark. It was sold as a variety 8 although it currently does not show-up in Douglas Winter's "Gold Coins Of The New Orleans Mint" 3rd edition. The reverse is very sharply struck and also shows the vertical shield lines extending into the horizontal lines along with the double punched mint mark. Walter Breen in his "Complete Encyclopedia Of U.S. And Colonial Coins" describes the 6172 variety - "Stars thin, attenuated; either the hub was weakly impressed, or obv. die was reground. Rev. as next [Large Date], base of mintmark repunched." My belief is that the die was lapped in an attempt to extend its life as the main portrait shows a rough finish often attributed to a rusty die especially at the hair and LIBERTY. There are also 2 rust lumps evident at the jaw/neck transition.

1843-O $2.50 Small Date MS61 PCGS #7731

NGC 4882981-003. This is a rare transition coin variety using the obverse of the small date (Winter's small date obverse 1) with the large date reverse (Winter's large date reverse A) showing the double punched mint mark. It was sold as a variety 8 although it currently does not show-up in Douglas Winter's "Gold Coins Of The New Orleans Mint" 3rd edition. The reverse is very sharply struck and also shows the vertical shield lines extending into the horizontal lines along with the double punched mint mark. Walter Breen in his "Complete Encyclopedia Of U.S. And Colonial Coins" describes the 6172 variety - "Stars thin, attenuated; either the hub was weakly impressed, or obv. die was reground. Rev. as next [Large Date], base of mintmark repunched." My belief is that the die was lapped in an attempt to extend its life as the main portrait shows a rough finish often attributed to a rusty die especially at the hair and LIBERTY. There are also 2 rust lumps evident at the jaw/neck transition.

1843-O $2.50 Small Date MS61 PCGS #7731

NGC 4882981-003. This is a rare transition coin variety using the obverse of the small date (Winter's small date obverse 1) with the large date reverse (Winter's large date reverse A) showing the double punched mint mark. It was sold as a variety 8 although it currently does not show-up in Douglas Winter's "Gold Coins Of The New Orleans Mint" 3rd edition. The reverse is very sharply struck and also shows the vertical shield lines extending into the horizontal lines along with the double punched mint mark. Walter Breen in his "Complete Encyclopedia Of U.S. And Colonial Coins" describes the 6172 variety - "Stars thin, attenuated; either the hub was weakly impressed, or obv. die was reground. Rev. as next [Large Date], base of mintmark repunched." My belief is that the die was lapped in an attempt to extend its life as the main portrait shows a rough finish often attributed to a rusty die especially at the hair and LIBERTY. There are also 2 rust lumps evident at the jaw/neck transition.

1844 $2.50 VF30 PCGS #7734

As Garrett and Guth state in their Encyclopedia, "the 1844 quarter eagle is rare in any grade."

1844 $2.50 VF30 PCGS #7734

As Garrett and Guth state in their Encyclopedia, "the 1844 quarter eagle is rare in any grade."

1844 $2.50 VF30 PCGS #7734

As Garrett and Guth state in their Encyclopedia, "the 1844 quarter eagle is rare in any grade."

1850-O $2.50 AU58 PCGS #7758

NGC 1842360-007. Rarity 7th of 14 per Douglas Winter's "Gold Coins Of The New Orleans Mint 1838-1909" Variety 1(1-A) Obverse: The 1 in the date does not touch the truncation Reverse: The mint mark is right of the arrow fletching Winter also states, "This is among the hardest dates in the New Orleans quarter eagle series to find with a sharp strike. Most are weakly impressed at the centers, and as with the 1847-O, have an appearance which can almost be described as "sunken". On the obverse there is considerable weakness on the curls below and behind Liberty's Ear and many of the stars are weak at their centers. The reverse is usually weak on the right leg and claw of the eagle as well as on the neck feathers." Garrett and Guth in their "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933" echo the poor quality with, "The most interesting feature of the 1850-O quarter eagle is the extremely poor quality of the strike on most known examples. The central portions are usually very weak, to the point of looking mushy." They also state, "This date is scarce in all grades, and just a few coins are offered for sale in most years."

1850-O $2.50 AU58 PCGS #7758

NGC 1842360-007. Rarity 7th of 14 per Douglas Winter's "Gold Coins Of The New Orleans Mint 1838-1909" Variety 1(1-A) Obverse: The 1 in the date does not touch the truncation Reverse: The mint mark is right of the arrow fletching Winter also states, "This is among the hardest dates in the New Orleans quarter eagle series to find with a sharp strike. Most are weakly impressed at the centers, and as with the 1847-O, have an appearance which can almost be described as "sunken". On the obverse there is considerable weakness on the curls below and behind Liberty's Ear and many of the stars are weak at their centers. The reverse is usually weak on the right leg and claw of the eagle as well as on the neck feathers." Garrett and Guth in their "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933" echo the poor quality with, "The most interesting feature of the 1850-O quarter eagle is the extremely poor quality of the strike on most known examples. The central portions are usually very weak, to the point of looking mushy." They also state, "This date is scarce in all grades, and just a few coins are offered for sale in most years."

1851-O $2.50 XF45 PCGS #7762

Early die state with full re-punched date. The photos included appear to show a doubled mint mark. I say "appear" because I can not find any reference to a re-punched mint mark in any of the literature and have not found any additional photos suggesting that a doubled mint mark exists. That said, Walter Breen in his Monograph on Quarter Eagles, pg 24, states that 4 reverse dies were supplied and that 2 mint mark locations have been observed. A second mint mark location, however, is not indicated in Douglas Winter's "Gold Coins Of The New Orleans Mint". Given the large mintage it is possible, maybe even likely, that multiple reverse dies were used during production. It is also possible that this arc inside the mint mark was caused by an errant fiber or burr caught in the die. The reverse impression is very heavy with the bevels on the legend and devices meeting in many areas, i.e. arrow head and last A in America, D and period, fraction bar and numbers, olive branch leaf and U in UNITED.

1851-O $2.50 XF45 PCGS #7762

Early die state with full re-punched date. The photos included appear to show a doubled mint mark. I say "appear" because I can not find any reference to a re-punched mint mark in any of the literature and have not found any additional photos suggesting that a doubled mint mark exists. That said, Walter Breen in his Monograph on Quarter Eagles, pg 24, states that 4 reverse dies were supplied and that 2 mint mark locations have been observed. A second mint mark location, however, is not indicated in Douglas Winter's "Gold Coins Of The New Orleans Mint". Given the large mintage it is possible, maybe even likely, that multiple reverse dies were used during production. It is also possible that this arc inside the mint mark was caused by an errant fiber or burr caught in the die. The reverse impression is very heavy with the bevels on the legend and devices meeting in many areas, i.e. arrow head and last A in America, D and period, fraction bar and numbers, olive branch leaf and U in UNITED.

1851-O $2.50 XF45 PCGS #7762

Early die state with full re-punched date. The photos included appear to show a doubled mint mark. I say "appear" because I can not find any reference to a re-punched mint mark in any of the literature and have not found any additional photos suggesting that a doubled mint mark exists. That said, Walter Breen in his Monograph on Quarter Eagles, pg 24, states that 4 reverse dies were supplied and that 2 mint mark locations have been observed. A second mint mark location, however, is not indicated in Douglas Winter's "Gold Coins Of The New Orleans Mint". Given the large mintage it is possible, maybe even likely, that multiple reverse dies were used during production. It is also possible that this arc inside the mint mark was caused by an errant fiber or burr caught in the die. The reverse impression is very heavy with the bevels on the legend and devices meeting in many areas, i.e. arrow head and last A in America, D and period, fraction bar and numbers, olive branch leaf and U in UNITED.

1851-O $2.50 XF45 PCGS #7762

Early die state with full re-punched date. The photos included appear to show a doubled mint mark. I say "appear" because I can not find any reference to a re-punched mint mark in any of the literature and have not found any additional photos suggesting that a doubled mint mark exists. That said, Walter Breen in his Monograph on Quarter Eagles, pg 24, states that 4 reverse dies were supplied and that 2 mint mark locations have been observed. A second mint mark location, however, is not indicated in Douglas Winter's "Gold Coins Of The New Orleans Mint". Given the large mintage it is possible, maybe even likely, that multiple reverse dies were used during production. It is also possible that this arc inside the mint mark was caused by an errant fiber or burr caught in the die. The reverse impression is very heavy with the bevels on the legend and devices meeting in many areas, i.e. arrow head and last A in America, D and period, fraction bar and numbers, olive branch leaf and U in UNITED.

1851-O $2.50 XF45 PCGS #7762

Early die state with full re-punched date. The photos included appear to show a doubled mint mark. I say "appear" because I can not find any reference to a re-punched mint mark in any of the literature and have not found any additional photos suggesting that a doubled mint mark exists. That said, Walter Breen in his Monograph on Quarter Eagles, pg 24, states that 4 reverse dies were supplied and that 2 mint mark locations have been observed. A second mint mark location, however, is not indicated in Douglas Winter's "Gold Coins Of The New Orleans Mint". Given the large mintage it is possible, maybe even likely, that multiple reverse dies were used during production. It is also possible that this arc inside the mint mark was caused by an errant fiber or burr caught in the die. The reverse impression is very heavy with the bevels on the legend and devices meeting in many areas, i.e. arrow head and last A in America, D and period, fraction bar and numbers, olive branch leaf and U in UNITED.

1851-O $2.50 XF45 PCGS #7762

Early die state with full re-punched date. The photos included appear to show a doubled mint mark. I say "appear" because I can not find any reference to a re-punched mint mark in any of the literature and have not found any additional photos suggesting that a doubled mint mark exists. That said, Walter Breen in his Monograph on Quarter Eagles, pg 24, states that 4 reverse dies were supplied and that 2 mint mark locations have been observed. A second mint mark location, however, is not indicated in Douglas Winter's "Gold Coins Of The New Orleans Mint". Given the large mintage it is possible, maybe even likely, that multiple reverse dies were used during production. It is also possible that this arc inside the mint mark was caused by an errant fiber or burr caught in the die. The reverse impression is very heavy with the bevels on the legend and devices meeting in many areas, i.e. arrow head and last A in America, D and period, fraction bar and numbers, olive branch leaf and U in UNITED.

1851-O $2.50 AU55 PCGS #7762

NGC 3275479-001. CAC certified. Rarity 8th of 14. Variety 1(1-A), showing re-punch of the lower serif of the last 1 in the date.

1851-O $2.50 AU55 PCGS #7762

NGC 3275479-001. CAC certified. Rarity 8th of 14. Variety 1(1-A), showing re-punch of the lower serif of the last 1 in the date.

1851-O $2.50 AU55 PCGS #7762

NGC 3275479-001. CAC certified. Rarity 8th of 14. Variety 1(1-A), showing re-punch of the lower serif of the last 1 in the date.

1856 $2.50 MS63 PCGS #7777

Per Garrett and Guth's "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933", "The size of the date on 1856 quarter eagles is much smaller than on previous issues from the Philadelphia Mint. Like the 1855 quarter eagle, the 1856 is unremarkable in circulated condition but becomes quite scarce in higher grades. Choice and gem examples are far rarer than later dates for this denomination... This date is usually well struck, and examples with moderate die scratches are sometimes seen." This coin does not show any die scratches but does have a small die rust spot at the jaw/neck. This appears to be common as the photo in Garrett and Guth's "Encyclopedia" of the Smithsonian coin shows the same spot.

1856 $2.50 MS63 PCGS #7777

Per Garrett and Guth's "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933", "The size of the date on 1856 quarter eagles is much smaller than on previous issues from the Philadelphia Mint. Like the 1855 quarter eagle, the 1856 is unremarkable in circulated condition but becomes quite scarce in higher grades. Choice and gem examples are far rarer than later dates for this denomination... This date is usually well struck, and examples with moderate die scratches are sometimes seen." This coin does not show any die scratches but does have a small die rust spot at the jaw/neck. This appears to be common as the photo in Garrett and Guth's "Encyclopedia" of the Smithsonian coin shows the same spot.

1859-S $2.50 AU55 PCGS #7790

NGC 3314846-002. Per Garrett & Guth's "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933", pg 81, "The mintage for the 1859-S quarter eagle drops considerably from the two previous San Francisco Mint issues... This issue was well circulated and heavily worn coins are normally encountered. The 1859-S quarter eagle was struck with the old-style reverse hub that features large letters and heavier arrows. The mint mark is also found partially filled on many examples". Per Breen's Complete Encyclopedia Of U.S. and Colonial Coins", pg 499, Breen 6248 "S normal or partially filled. Often weakly struck. Ex rare above EF."

1859-S $2.50 AU55 PCGS #7790

NGC 3314846-002. Per Garrett & Guth's "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933", pg 81, "The mintage for the 1859-S quarter eagle drops considerably from the two previous San Francisco Mint issues... This issue was well circulated and heavily worn coins are normally encountered. The 1859-S quarter eagle was struck with the old-style reverse hub that features large letters and heavier arrows. The mint mark is also found partially filled on many examples". Per Breen's Complete Encyclopedia Of U.S. and Colonial Coins", pg 499, Breen 6248 "S normal or partially filled. Often weakly struck. Ex rare above EF."

1860-S $2.50 AU53 PCGS #7793

NGC 380613-011. This coin shows evidence of a re-punched date with digit elements between the 86 and 61. Walter Breen in his "Complete encyclopedia of U.S. and Colonial Coins" refers to this coin (his 6255) as "rare". Garrett and Guth consider the coin underrated in their "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933" (2008). They say, "A review of auction data for the last decade clearly illustrates the true rarity of the 1860-S quarter eagle. Only 26 examples have been offered since 1999; four of those were in the auctions of the Harry W. Bass Jr. collection... This date saw extensive circulation and most examples that are seen today are heavily worn. The 1860-S quarter eagle is truly underrated when compared to the coins of this era from the Southern mints." David Akers' "United States Gold Coins - An Analysis of Auction Records - Volume II - Quarter Eagles" (1975) states, "The 1860-S is a very scarce coin in any condition and is extremely rare better than EF... most known specimens are very worn." His Average Grade for the 1860-S quarter eagle is VF-28. This coin shows fine hairlines throughout resulting in the AU53 grade. Looking at the auction records of 3 major auction houses (and excluding details/damaged coins) only 55 1860-S quarter eagles have been sold in the last 11 1/2 years. Some of those 55 are repeat sales of the same coin.

1860-S $2.50 AU53 PCGS #7793

NGC 380613-011. This coin shows evidence of a re-punched date with digit elements between the 86 and 61. Walter Breen in his "Complete encyclopedia of U.S. and Colonial Coins" refers to this coin (his 6255) as "rare". Garrett and Guth consider the coin underrated in their "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933" (2008). They say, "A review of auction data for the last decade clearly illustrates the true rarity of the 1860-S quarter eagle. Only 26 examples have been offered since 1999; four of those were in the auctions of the Harry W. Bass Jr. collection... This date saw extensive circulation and most examples that are seen today are heavily worn. The 1860-S quarter eagle is truly underrated when compared to the coins of this era from the Southern mints." David Akers' "United States Gold Coins - An Analysis of Auction Records - Volume II - Quarter Eagles" (1975) states, "The 1860-S is a very scarce coin in any condition and is extremely rare better than EF... most known specimens are very worn." His Average Grade for the 1860-S quarter eagle is VF-28. This coin shows fine hairlines throughout resulting in the AU53 grade. Looking at the auction records of 3 major auction houses (and excluding details/damaged coins) only 55 1860-S quarter eagles have been sold in the last 11 1/2 years. Some of those 55 are repeat sales of the same coin.

1861-S $2.50 AU55 PCGS #7795

Garrett and Guth state in their "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933", "The 1861-S quarter eagle is another issue with a moderately low mintage that was heavily circulated and has few survivors. This date is usually seen heavily worn and becomes increasingly rare in higher grades... The 1861-S quarter eagle does not garner much attention, but can be extremely difficult to locate in any grade." "Walter Breen's Complete Encyclopedia of U.S. And Colonial Coins" asserts, "'Type 1' rev. Very scarce. One obv. shipped Nov. 1860, one June 1861: leftover revs. from 1856. Much rarer in all grades than mintage figure suggests; usually weak VF, Ex. rare in EF, unknown UNC." Since his book was published in 1988, as many as 11 uncirculated coins may exist although PCGS suggests only 4 in MS60 and above. I have found 3 distinct reverse dies were used, identified by the location of the mint mark. The first has the mint mark slanted right with the lower serif of the S almost touching the fraction bar (see PCGS website MS62+ photo). The second is more upright and positioned above the upper serif of the D (see PCGS website AU58 photos). The third has the mint mark positioned left between the 1 in the fraction and the fraction bar (see NGC website sn 3516516-010 AU55)(This appears to be the rarest of the three and its the best photo I could find - sorry). This coin has the upright mint mark above the D upper serif. There is also a contact mark (point) between stars 7 and 8. Pedigree: Maurice Storck Collection (2020)

1861-S $2.50 AU55 PCGS #7795

Garrett and Guth state in their "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933", "The 1861-S quarter eagle is another issue with a moderately low mintage that was heavily circulated and has few survivors. This date is usually seen heavily worn and becomes increasingly rare in higher grades... The 1861-S quarter eagle does not garner much attention, but can be extremely difficult to locate in any grade." "Walter Breen's Complete Encyclopedia of U.S. And Colonial Coins" asserts, "'Type 1' rev. Very scarce. One obv. shipped Nov. 1860, one June 1861: leftover revs. from 1856. Much rarer in all grades than mintage figure suggests; usually weak VF, Ex. rare in EF, unknown UNC." Since his book was published in 1988, as many as 11 uncirculated coins may exist although PCGS suggests only 4 in MS60 and above. I have found 3 distinct reverse dies were used, identified by the location of the mint mark. The first has the mint mark slanted right with the lower serif of the S almost touching the fraction bar (see PCGS website MS62+ photo). The second is more upright and positioned above the upper serif of the D (see PCGS website AU58 photos). The third has the mint mark positioned left between the 1 in the fraction and the fraction bar (see NGC website sn 3516516-010 AU55)(This appears to be the rarest of the three and its the best photo I could find - sorry). This coin has the upright mint mark above the D upper serif. There is also a contact mark (point) between stars 7 and 8. Pedigree: Maurice Storck Collection (2020)

1861-S $2.50 AU55 PCGS #7795

Garrett and Guth state in their "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933", "The 1861-S quarter eagle is another issue with a moderately low mintage that was heavily circulated and has few survivors. This date is usually seen heavily worn and becomes increasingly rare in higher grades... The 1861-S quarter eagle does not garner much attention, but can be extremely difficult to locate in any grade." "Walter Breen's Complete Encyclopedia of U.S. And Colonial Coins" asserts, "'Type 1' rev. Very scarce. One obv. shipped Nov. 1860, one June 1861: leftover revs. from 1856. Much rarer in all grades than mintage figure suggests; usually weak VF, Ex. rare in EF, unknown UNC." Since his book was published in 1988, as many as 11 uncirculated coins may exist although PCGS suggests only 4 in MS60 and above. I have found 3 distinct reverse dies were used, identified by the location of the mint mark. The first has the mint mark slanted right with the lower serif of the S almost touching the fraction bar (see PCGS website MS62+ photo). The second is more upright and positioned above the upper serif of the D (see PCGS website AU58 photos). The third has the mint mark positioned left between the 1 in the fraction and the fraction bar (see NGC website sn 3516516-010 AU55)(This appears to be the rarest of the three and its the best photo I could find - sorry). This coin has the upright mint mark above the D upper serif. There is also a contact mark (point) between stars 7 and 8. Pedigree: Maurice Storck Collection (2020)

1862 $2.50 AU58 PCGS #7796

Garrett and Guth in their "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933" state, "The mintage of the 1862 quarter eagle dropped considerably at the Philadelphia Mint from the previous year. Even with a rather substantial production of nearly 100,000 coins, this date is scarce in all grades. The 1862 quarter eagle is many, many times rarer than the 1861. Gold coinage after the start of the Civil War did not circulate with regularity, and many great rarities were produced during this era. Most of the examples seen of this date are well struck, some with die clashes visible on one or both sides." Subtle die clashing on this coin can be seen with the aid of a loupe.

1862 $2.50 AU58 PCGS #7796

Garrett and Guth in their "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933" state, "The mintage of the 1862 quarter eagle dropped considerably at the Philadelphia Mint from the previous year. Even with a rather substantial production of nearly 100,000 coins, this date is scarce in all grades. The 1862 quarter eagle is many, many times rarer than the 1861. Gold coinage after the start of the Civil War did not circulate with regularity, and many great rarities were produced during this era. Most of the examples seen of this date are well struck, some with die clashes visible on one or both sides." Subtle die clashing on this coin can be seen with the aid of a loupe.

1862 $2.50 AU58 PCGS #7796

Garrett and Guth in their "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933" state, "The mintage of the 1862 quarter eagle dropped considerably at the Philadelphia Mint from the previous year. Even with a rather substantial production of nearly 100,000 coins, this date is scarce in all grades. The 1862 quarter eagle is many, many times rarer than the 1861. Gold coinage after the start of the Civil War did not circulate with regularity, and many great rarities were produced during this era. Most of the examples seen of this date are well struck, some with die clashes visible on one or both sides." Subtle die clashing on this coin can be seen with the aid of a loupe.

1867 $2.50 AU58 PCGS #7805

David Akers' "United States Gold Coins - An Analysis of Auction records - Volume II Quarter Eagles 1796-1929" (1975) comments, "Very rare in all grades..." Walter Breen's "Complete Encyclopedia Of U.S. And Continental Coins" (1988) calls the 1867 Quarter Eagle, "Rare... Business strikes (Jan. 22) have hollows (polished areas) below BE and in and below ear." And most recently (2008) Garrett and Guth in their "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933" indicates, "The 1867 quarter eagle is scarce, if not truly rare, in all grades. Most of the examples seen are circulated to some degree, and this date is very rare in full Mint State... Most of the high-grade examples seen have at least partially prooflike surfaces." Garrett and Guth also indicates the "Finest Smithsonian Institution specimen: AU-55" This coin also shows field die stria (angling 11:00 to 5:00) below the nose, jaw, and at the date - similar to PCGS s/n 16403663 (MS61).

1867 $2.50 AU58 PCGS #7805

David Akers' "United States Gold Coins - An Analysis of Auction records - Volume II Quarter Eagles 1796-1929" (1975) comments, "Very rare in all grades..." Walter Breen's "Complete Encyclopedia Of U.S. And Continental Coins" (1988) calls the 1867 Quarter Eagle, "Rare... Business strikes (Jan. 22) have hollows (polished areas) below BE and in and below ear." And most recently (2008) Garrett and Guth in their "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933" indicates, "The 1867 quarter eagle is scarce, if not truly rare, in all grades. Most of the examples seen are circulated to some degree, and this date is very rare in full Mint State... Most of the high-grade examples seen have at least partially prooflike surfaces." Garrett and Guth also indicates the "Finest Smithsonian Institution specimen: AU-55" This coin also shows field die stria (angling 11:00 to 5:00) below the nose, jaw, and at the date - similar to PCGS s/n 16403663 (MS61).

1867 $2.50 AU58 PCGS #7805

David Akers' "United States Gold Coins - An Analysis of Auction records - Volume II Quarter Eagles 1796-1929" (1975) comments, "Very rare in all grades..." Walter Breen's "Complete Encyclopedia Of U.S. And Continental Coins" (1988) calls the 1867 Quarter Eagle, "Rare... Business strikes (Jan. 22) have hollows (polished areas) below BE and in and below ear." And most recently (2008) Garrett and Guth in their "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933" indicates, "The 1867 quarter eagle is scarce, if not truly rare, in all grades. Most of the examples seen are circulated to some degree, and this date is very rare in full Mint State... Most of the high-grade examples seen have at least partially prooflike surfaces." Garrett and Guth also indicates the "Finest Smithsonian Institution specimen: AU-55" This coin also shows field die stria (angling 11:00 to 5:00) below the nose, jaw, and at the date - similar to PCGS s/n 16403663 (MS61).

1867 $2.50 AU58 PCGS #7805

Pedigree: Millenium Collection, Toro Collection (2021). Garrett and Guth's "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933" states, "The 1867 quarter eagle is scarce, if not truly rare, in all grades. Most of the examples seen are circulated to some degree, and this date is very rare in full Mint State... Most of the high-grade examples seen have at least partially prooflike surfaces." They also indicate that the Finest Smithsonian Institution specimen is an AU-55 (as of 2008). David Akers' "United States Gold Coins - An Analysis of Auction records - Volume II Quarter Eagles 1796-1929" (1975) comments, "Very rare in all grades..." PCGS estimates the survival in all grades at 50 This coin does exhibit prooflike surfaces in protected areas.

1867 $2.50 AU58 PCGS #7805

Pedigree: Millenium Collection, Toro Collection (2021). Garrett and Guth's "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933" states, "The 1867 quarter eagle is scarce, if not truly rare, in all grades. Most of the examples seen are circulated to some degree, and this date is very rare in full Mint State... Most of the high-grade examples seen have at least partially prooflike surfaces." They also indicate that the Finest Smithsonian Institution specimen is an AU-55 (as of 2008). David Akers' "United States Gold Coins - An Analysis of Auction records - Volume II Quarter Eagles 1796-1929" (1975) comments, "Very rare in all grades..." PCGS estimates the survival in all grades at 50 This coin does exhibit prooflike surfaces in protected areas.

1868-S $2.50 AU58 PCGS #7808

NGC 4885019-004. Garrett and Guth, through their "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933" state, "As a date, the 1868-S is slightly more available than previous quarter eagles of the 1860s from the San Francisco mint. This issue is almost always seen well worn or damaged. Extremely fine and almost uncirculated coins can be found with some effort. This coin has a deep bronze toning which highlights the devices and legend, apparently from an excess of copper and some impurities (silver) in the planchet. Pedigree - Poulos Family Collection (2019)

1868-S $2.50 AU58 PCGS #7808

NGC 4885019-004. Garrett and Guth, through their "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933" state, "As a date, the 1868-S is slightly more available than previous quarter eagles of the 1860s from the San Francisco mint. This issue is almost always seen well worn or damaged. Extremely fine and almost uncirculated coins can be found with some effort. This coin has a deep bronze toning which highlights the devices and legend, apparently from an excess of copper and some impurities (silver) in the planchet. Pedigree - Poulos Family Collection (2019)

1871-S $2.50 MS62 PCGS #7814

This coin shows a deep orange patina with touches of lavender suggesting an overabundance of copper and some silver in the chemistry.

1871-S $2.50 MS62 PCGS #7814

This coin shows a deep orange patina with touches of lavender suggesting an overabundance of copper and some silver in the chemistry.

1878 $2.50 MS64 PCGS #7828

Walter Breen in his "Complete Encyclopedia of U.S. And Colonial Coins" pg 498, number 6239, states, Minor positional vars.; one with traces of re-punching on the 1, and round hollow atop second shield stripe (center punch in hub?)". The re-punching of the 1 in the date consists of a very, very small tick below the upper serif and a slightly thicker lower left serif. Garrett and Guth's "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933" asserts, "Uncirculated examples of the 1857 quarter eagle become scarce starting at the MS60 level. Choice and gem coins are offered very infrequently."

1878 $2.50 MS64 PCGS #7828

Walter Breen in his "Complete Encyclopedia of U.S. And Colonial Coins" pg 498, number 6239, states, Minor positional vars.; one with traces of re-punching on the 1, and round hollow atop second shield stripe (center punch in hub?)". The re-punching of the 1 in the date consists of a very, very small tick below the upper serif and a slightly thicker lower left serif. Garrett and Guth's "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933" asserts, "Uncirculated examples of the 1857 quarter eagle become scarce starting at the MS60 level. Choice and gem coins are offered very infrequently."

1891 $2.50 MS64 PCGS #7843

All 1891 business strike coins that I have seen show doubling of the reverse even though many holder titles do not indicate it. This is especially true of the right side legend (OF AMERICA), the denomination D including the period and dot, the eagle's right wing, and the arrows heads. Early strikes tend to show doubling of the top arrow shaft, fraction bar and denominator 2 as well. Garrett and Guth's "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933" states, "The 1891 quarter eagle is a scarce, low-mintage date. In grades up to gem Uncirculated, the 1891 commands little or no premium over more common dates. This is difficult to understand, as the 1891 quarter eagle is many times rarer than any of the later-date issues. Gem examples are very rare, with just a few graded at that level."

1891 $2.50 MS64 PCGS #7843

All 1891 business strike coins that I have seen show doubling of the reverse even though many holder titles do not indicate it. This is especially true of the right side legend (OF AMERICA), the denomination D including the period and dot, the eagle's right wing, and the arrows heads. Early strikes tend to show doubling of the top arrow shaft, fraction bar and denominator 2 as well. Garrett and Guth's "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933" states, "The 1891 quarter eagle is a scarce, low-mintage date. In grades up to gem Uncirculated, the 1891 commands little or no premium over more common dates. This is difficult to understand, as the 1891 quarter eagle is many times rarer than any of the later-date issues. Gem examples are very rare, with just a few graded at that level."

1891 $2.50 MS64 PCGS #7843

All 1891 business strike coins that I have seen show doubling of the reverse even though many holder titles do not indicate it. This is especially true of the right side legend (OF AMERICA), the denomination D including the period and dot, the eagle's right wing, and the arrows heads. Early strikes tend to show doubling of the top arrow shaft, fraction bar and denominator 2 as well. Garrett and Guth's "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933" states, "The 1891 quarter eagle is a scarce, low-mintage date. In grades up to gem Uncirculated, the 1891 commands little or no premium over more common dates. This is difficult to understand, as the 1891 quarter eagle is many times rarer than any of the later-date issues. Gem examples are very rare, with just a few graded at that level."

1894 $2.50 MS62 PCGS #7846

"The 1894 quarter eagle is a moderately scarce date in all grades, boasting a nice, low mintage of only 4,000 coins.", per Garrett and Guth in their "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933".

1894 $2.50 MS62 PCGS #7846

"The 1894 quarter eagle is a moderately scarce date in all grades, boasting a nice, low mintage of only 4,000 coins.", per Garrett and Guth in their "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933".

1896 $2.50 MS64 PCGS #7848

OGH. Deep orange-gold color.

1896 $2.50 MS64 PCGS #7848

OGH. Deep orange-gold color.

1897 $2.50 MS65 PCGS #7849

NGC 3333206-005

1897 $2.50 MS65 PCGS #7849

NGC 3333206-005

1834 $5 Classic, Plain 4 AU53 PCGS #8171

NGC/CAC 3659734-001. Breen 6501, McCloskey 3B?, R1? Obverse - Plain 4, script 8, tall serif on 1, 3 center spike almost touches upper knob. First head - with markedly curved and rounded truncation. Reverse - No berry in the olive branch, no tongue in the eagle. This coin exhibits Mint made die scribe arcs between the D-S and left of the U and left of the 5. Per Breen's "Early United States Half Eagles" monograph pg 68, II-1, "Proofs generally show guide lines (arcs of circles in line with bases of letters) left and right of 5D., left of U, between D-S, between F-A...". "Some proofs evidently went into circulation as there are 'AU' pieces showing earmarks of proof status." These Mint made guide lines make this coin a rarity (R5??) within the Breen 6501, McCloskey 3B family. In Daryl Haynor's new book "United States Classic Gold Coins of 1834-1839", the 1834 HM-3, die marriage 3-C, he clarifies Breen's remarks by stating, "Proof coins were made with this die marriage.", thus suggesting that both proof and circulated coins were made from the same die pairing and not as a mistaken release of proof coins into circulation as Breen suggested in the 1960s. He goes on to say, "The earliest minted specimens exhibit guide lines around the periphery of the reverse, located most prominently above and below the left wing tip, to the left of the second leaf, to the right of the third leaf, to the right of 5D., and above the right wing tip. The guide lines delineate the base of the letters around the border while being punched into the design." Haynor gives the HM-3 die marriage a rarity ranking of R2 with 27% of the total 1834 Half Eagle population. My own research (archived photos for the last 10 years, multiple sources) estimates that the population of HM-3 marriages with visible die lines is about 8% giving a rarity ranking of between R3 and R4 for coins exhibiting the scribe marks. Aside; I highly recommend Haynor's book to anyone collecting Classic Head Quarter and Half Eagles. It has significantly more information and detailed photos missing in previously published documents. Excellent resource.

1834 $5 Classic, Plain 4 AU53 PCGS #8171

NGC/CAC 3659734-001. Breen 6501, McCloskey 3B?, R1? Obverse - Plain 4, script 8, tall serif on 1, 3 center spike almost touches upper knob. First head - with markedly curved and rounded truncation. Reverse - No berry in the olive branch, no tongue in the eagle. This coin exhibits Mint made die scribe arcs between the D-S and left of the U and left of the 5. Per Breen's "Early United States Half Eagles" monograph pg 68, II-1, "Proofs generally show guide lines (arcs of circles in line with bases of letters) left and right of 5D., left of U, between D-S, between F-A...". "Some proofs evidently went into circulation as there are 'AU' pieces showing earmarks of proof status." These Mint made guide lines make this coin a rarity (R5??) within the Breen 6501, McCloskey 3B family. In Daryl Haynor's new book "United States Classic Gold Coins of 1834-1839", the 1834 HM-3, die marriage 3-C, he clarifies Breen's remarks by stating, "Proof coins were made with this die marriage.", thus suggesting that both proof and circulated coins were made from the same die pairing and not as a mistaken release of proof coins into circulation as Breen suggested in the 1960s. He goes on to say, "The earliest minted specimens exhibit guide lines around the periphery of the reverse, located most prominently above and below the left wing tip, to the left of the second leaf, to the right of the third leaf, to the right of 5D., and above the right wing tip. The guide lines delineate the base of the letters around the border while being punched into the design." Haynor gives the HM-3 die marriage a rarity ranking of R2 with 27% of the total 1834 Half Eagle population. My own research (archived photos for the last 10 years, multiple sources) estimates that the population of HM-3 marriages with visible die lines is about 8% giving a rarity ranking of between R3 and R4 for coins exhibiting the scribe marks. Aside; I highly recommend Haynor's book to anyone collecting Classic Head Quarter and Half Eagles. It has significantly more information and detailed photos missing in previously published documents. Excellent resource.

1834 $5 Classic, Plain 4 AU53 PCGS #8171

NGC/CAC 3659734-001. Breen 6501, McCloskey 3B?, R1? Obverse - Plain 4, script 8, tall serif on 1, 3 center spike almost touches upper knob. First head - with markedly curved and rounded truncation. Reverse - No berry in the olive branch, no tongue in the eagle. This coin exhibits Mint made die scribe arcs between the D-S and left of the U and left of the 5. Per Breen's "Early United States Half Eagles" monograph pg 68, II-1, "Proofs generally show guide lines (arcs of circles in line with bases of letters) left and right of 5D., left of U, between D-S, between F-A...". "Some proofs evidently went into circulation as there are 'AU' pieces showing earmarks of proof status." These Mint made guide lines make this coin a rarity (R5??) within the Breen 6501, McCloskey 3B family. In Daryl Haynor's new book "United States Classic Gold Coins of 1834-1839", the 1834 HM-3, die marriage 3-C, he clarifies Breen's remarks by stating, "Proof coins were made with this die marriage.", thus suggesting that both proof and circulated coins were made from the same die pairing and not as a mistaken release of proof coins into circulation as Breen suggested in the 1960s. He goes on to say, "The earliest minted specimens exhibit guide lines around the periphery of the reverse, located most prominently above and below the left wing tip, to the left of the second leaf, to the right of the third leaf, to the right of 5D., and above the right wing tip. The guide lines delineate the base of the letters around the border while being punched into the design." Haynor gives the HM-3 die marriage a rarity ranking of R2 with 27% of the total 1834 Half Eagle population. My own research (archived photos for the last 10 years, multiple sources) estimates that the population of HM-3 marriages with visible die lines is about 8% giving a rarity ranking of between R3 and R4 for coins exhibiting the scribe marks. Aside; I highly recommend Haynor's book to anyone collecting Classic Head Quarter and Half Eagles. It has significantly more information and detailed photos missing in previously published documents. Excellent resource.

1834 $5 Classic, Plain 4 AU53 PCGS #8171

NGC/CAC 3659734-001. Breen 6501, McCloskey 3B?, R1? Obverse - Plain 4, script 8, tall serif on 1, 3 center spike almost touches upper knob. First head - with markedly curved and rounded truncation. Reverse - No berry in the olive branch, no tongue in the eagle. This coin exhibits Mint made die scribe arcs between the D-S and left of the U and left of the 5. Per Breen's "Early United States Half Eagles" monograph pg 68, II-1, "Proofs generally show guide lines (arcs of circles in line with bases of letters) left and right of 5D., left of U, between D-S, between F-A...". "Some proofs evidently went into circulation as there are 'AU' pieces showing earmarks of proof status." These Mint made guide lines make this coin a rarity (R5??) within the Breen 6501, McCloskey 3B family. In Daryl Haynor's new book "United States Classic Gold Coins of 1834-1839", the 1834 HM-3, die marriage 3-C, he clarifies Breen's remarks by stating, "Proof coins were made with this die marriage.", thus suggesting that both proof and circulated coins were made from the same die pairing and not as a mistaken release of proof coins into circulation as Breen suggested in the 1960s. He goes on to say, "The earliest minted specimens exhibit guide lines around the periphery of the reverse, located most prominently above and below the left wing tip, to the left of the second leaf, to the right of the third leaf, to the right of 5D., and above the right wing tip. The guide lines delineate the base of the letters around the border while being punched into the design." Haynor gives the HM-3 die marriage a rarity ranking of R2 with 27% of the total 1834 Half Eagle population. My own research (archived photos for the last 10 years, multiple sources) estimates that the population of HM-3 marriages with visible die lines is about 8% giving a rarity ranking of between R3 and R4 for coins exhibiting the scribe marks. Aside; I highly recommend Haynor's book to anyone collecting Classic Head Quarter and Half Eagles. It has significantly more information and detailed photos missing in previously published documents. Excellent resource.

1857 $5 MS62 PCGS #8271

PCGS suggests the Mint State (MS60 or better) population is only 30. Garrett and Guth in their "Encyclopedia Of U.S. Gold Coins" describe the 1857 as "scarce in any grade and very rare in full Mint State. Choice examples are seldom seen." David Akers' auction analysis "Volume IV" (1979) states, "The 1857 is a very scarce coin in any condition and it is less often seen than some of the more popular mint marked coins of the 1840's and 1850's. Although strictly uncirculated coins are occasionally available they are rare and gem quality coins are extremely rare."

1857 $5 MS62 PCGS #8271

PCGS suggests the Mint State (MS60 or better) population is only 30. Garrett and Guth in their "Encyclopedia Of U.S. Gold Coins" describe the 1857 as "scarce in any grade and very rare in full Mint State. Choice examples are seldom seen." David Akers' auction analysis "Volume IV" (1979) states, "The 1857 is a very scarce coin in any condition and it is less often seen than some of the more popular mint marked coins of the 1840's and 1850's. Although strictly uncirculated coins are occasionally available they are rare and gem quality coins are extremely rare."

1857-S $5 AU55 PCGS #8275

NGC 561454-008. I have found three different varieties for this San Francisco date readily identified by the position and size of the mint mark on the reverse. The first variety is the large mint mark variety (as seen in the earlier 1855-S and 1856-S half eagles). The mint mark is almost as large as the legend S's in STATES and located over the left side of the vertical bar in the E in FIVE. The date on this variety is left of center and high with the 1 nearer the truncation than the dentils and the 7 touching the truncation. The date is also seen with the 1 57 double punched. (Ref. PCGS s/n 34510960 MS65) The second variety is the small mint mark (roughly a third smaller than the large mint mark) variety with the mint mark equidistant from the talon and arrow feather. The mint mark is fully impressed and located over the inside edge of the V left serif. The date is more centrally located with the 1 equidistant between the truncation and dentils and the 7 touching the truncation. (Ref. PCGS s/n 35198065 MS66). The third variety is the small mint mark variety with the mint mark below the lowest arrow feather tip further from the talon than the previous variety. The mint mark is weakly impressed and located between the two serifs in the V in FIVE. The date is the same as the second variety centrally located with the 1 equidistant between the truncation and dentils and the 7 touching the truncation. (Ref. PCGS s/n 36035010 AU55 and the coin shown above). Walter Breen's "Complete Encyclopedia of U.S. and Colonial Coins" suggests that the small mint mark variety (his 6633) is scarcer than the large mint mark (his 6632) but not by much (40,000 small mint mark versus 48,000 for the large mint mark). Per Garrett and Guth's "Encyclopedia Of U.S. Gold Coins - 1795-1933", The finest example in the Smithsonian Collection is an AU55 large mint mark.

1857-S $5 AU55 PCGS #8275

NGC 561454-008. I have found three different varieties for this San Francisco date readily identified by the position and size of the mint mark on the reverse. The first variety is the large mint mark variety (as seen in the earlier 1855-S and 1856-S half eagles). The mint mark is almost as large as the legend S's in STATES and located over the left side of the vertical bar in the E in FIVE. The date on this variety is left of center and high with the 1 nearer the truncation than the dentils and the 7 touching the truncation. The date is also seen with the 1 57 double punched. (Ref. PCGS s/n 34510960 MS65) The second variety is the small mint mark (roughly a third smaller than the large mint mark) variety with the mint mark equidistant from the talon and arrow feather. The mint mark is fully impressed and located over the inside edge of the V left serif. The date is more centrally located with the 1 equidistant between the truncation and dentils and the 7 touching the truncation. (Ref. PCGS s/n 35198065 MS66). The third variety is the small mint mark variety with the mint mark below the lowest arrow feather tip further from the talon than the previous variety. The mint mark is weakly impressed and located between the two serifs in the V in FIVE. The date is the same as the second variety centrally located with the 1 equidistant between the truncation and dentils and the 7 touching the truncation. (Ref. PCGS s/n 36035010 AU55 and the coin shown above). Walter Breen's "Complete Encyclopedia of U.S. and Colonial Coins" suggests that the small mint mark variety (his 6633) is scarcer than the large mint mark (his 6632) but not by much (40,000 small mint mark versus 48,000 for the large mint mark). Per Garrett and Guth's "Encyclopedia Of U.S. Gold Coins - 1795-1933", The finest example in the Smithsonian Collection is an AU55 large mint mark.

1888-S $5 AU58 PCGS #8373

Garrett and Guth in their "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933" state, "Despite a seemingly generous mintage, the 1888-S half eagle is a scarce date but can be found with some effort. Most examples are very bagmarked, and ones with good eye appeal are rare... All in all, the 1888-S half eagle is an underappreciated rarity." Walter Breen's "Complete Encyclopedia Of U.S. And Colonial Coins" suggests, "Usually VF; very rare above" David Akers' "United States Gold Coins - An Analysis of Auction Records - Volume IV - Half Eagles 1795-1929" echoes the scarcity, "Undoubtedly because of the "common date" status of the other S Mint Mark Half Eagles of the 1880's, the 1888-S is generally regarded as a common date as well. As auction data shows, however, it is not at all common and is actually very scarce in all grades and surprisingly rare in strictly uncirculated condition." His average grade is only VF28 for the 49 1888-S coins in his survey. This coin shows very few contact marks given the observations listed above and also has a generous amount of luster remaining.

1888-S $5 AU58 PCGS #8373

Garrett and Guth in their "Encyclopedia of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933" state, "Despite a seemingly generous mintage, the 1888-S half eagle is a scarce date but can be found with some effort. Most examples are very bagmarked, and ones with good eye appeal are rare... All in all, the 1888-S half eagle is an underappreciated rarity." Walter Breen's "Complete Encyclopedia Of U.S. And Colonial Coins" suggests, "Usually VF; very rare above" David Akers' "United States Gold Coins - An Analysis of Auction Records - Volume IV - Half Eagles 1795-1929" echoes the scarcity, "Undoubtedly because of the "common date" status of the other S Mint Mark Half Eagles of the 1880's, the 1888-S is generally regarded as a common date as well. As auction data shows, however, it is not at all common and is actually very scarce in all grades and surprisingly rare in strictly uncirculated condition." His average grade is only VF28 for the 49 1888-S coins in his survey. This coin shows very few contact marks given the observations listed above and also has a generous amount of luster remaining.

1848-O $10 VF30 PCGS #8600

Rarity 12th of 21, per Douglas Winter's "Gold Coins of the New Orleans Mint" Variety 1(1-A) Obverse - date evenly located between bust and dentils. Reverse - shield ring, die file marks between eagle's right shoulder and neck, mint mark located high and left of gap in the EN in TEN.

1848-O $10 VF30 PCGS #8600

Rarity 12th of 21, per Douglas Winter's "Gold Coins of the New Orleans Mint" Variety 1(1-A) Obverse - date evenly located between bust and dentils. Reverse - shield ring, die file marks between eagle's right shoulder and neck, mint mark located high and left of gap in the EN in TEN.

1848-O $10 VF30 PCGS #8600

Rarity 12th of 21, per Douglas Winter's "Gold Coins of the New Orleans Mint" Variety 1(1-A) Obverse - date evenly located between bust and dentils. Reverse - shield ring, die file marks between eagle's right shoulder and neck, mint mark located high and left of gap in the EN in TEN.

1850 $10 Small Date XF45 PCGS #8604

NGC 3168578-008. "Encyclopedia Of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933" by Garrett and Guth states, "The 1850 eagle can be found with a Large Date or a Small Date, the former being much more common than the latter by a factor of approximately 3 to 1, depending on the data source... The 1850, Small Date eagle is a very scarce and under-appreciated major variety. The Small Date punch was intended for the large cents and half eagles; its use on the eagle was an apparent mistake. Auction appearances of the Large and Small Date varieties have been about equal over the past dozen years, hiding the true rarity of the Small Date. The key is the population reports, which show the Small Date as being several times rarer than the Large Date." A review of current auction data indicates a ratio of Small Date to Large Date of 3.8 to 1. Walter Breen in his "Complete Encyclopedia Of U.S. And Colonial Coins" suggests the 1850 Small Date is "Very rare" although a better descriptor would be scarce. PCGS's "Survival Estimate" for all grades of the Small Date is 137.

1850 $10 Small Date XF45 PCGS #8604

NGC 3168578-008. "Encyclopedia Of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933" by Garrett and Guth states, "The 1850 eagle can be found with a Large Date or a Small Date, the former being much more common than the latter by a factor of approximately 3 to 1, depending on the data source... The 1850, Small Date eagle is a very scarce and under-appreciated major variety. The Small Date punch was intended for the large cents and half eagles; its use on the eagle was an apparent mistake. Auction appearances of the Large and Small Date varieties have been about equal over the past dozen years, hiding the true rarity of the Small Date. The key is the population reports, which show the Small Date as being several times rarer than the Large Date." A review of current auction data indicates a ratio of Small Date to Large Date of 3.8 to 1. Walter Breen in his "Complete Encyclopedia Of U.S. And Colonial Coins" suggests the 1850 Small Date is "Very rare" although a better descriptor would be scarce. PCGS's "Survival Estimate" for all grades of the Small Date is 137.

1853-O $10 AU55 PCGS #8612

NGC 1822980-003 Variety 1(1-A) ?? Obverse: The date is low, closer to the dentils than the Truncation. Winter does not mention the light re-punched date or die crack at the date which are evident in this coin. Further observations of variety 1(1-A) coins show that the re-punch and crack while not common are not unusual. However, I have also found mention of varieties 6, 7, and 8 at an auction site that do not show-up in Winter's latest book (2020). Reverse: No shield ring, the mint mark is high and centered between EN in TEN. Winter also states, "The surfaces are nearly always very abraded with most showing deep, detracting marks in the fields... The natural coloration ranges from deep green-gold to rich orange-gold... This is a surprisingly difficult issue to locate with good eye appeal. The typical 1853-O eagle is well struck and shows remaining luster but is usually seen with numerous marks which limit the eye appeal. While this is a common date within this series, nice AU55 and better coins with good eye appeal are much scarcer than generally believed."

1853-O $10 AU55 PCGS #8612

NGC 1822980-003 Variety 1(1-A) ?? Obverse: The date is low, closer to the dentils than the Truncation. Winter does not mention the light re-punched date or die crack at the date which are evident in this coin. Further observations of variety 1(1-A) coins show that the re-punch and crack while not common are not unusual. However, I have also found mention of varieties 6, 7, and 8 at an auction site that do not show-up in Winter's latest book (2020). Reverse: No shield ring, the mint mark is high and centered between EN in TEN. Winter also states, "The surfaces are nearly always very abraded with most showing deep, detracting marks in the fields... The natural coloration ranges from deep green-gold to rich orange-gold... This is a surprisingly difficult issue to locate with good eye appeal. The typical 1853-O eagle is well struck and shows remaining luster but is usually seen with numerous marks which limit the eye appeal. While this is a common date within this series, nice AU55 and better coins with good eye appeal are much scarcer than generally believed."

1853-O $10 AU55 PCGS #8612

NGC 1822980-003 Variety 1(1-A) ?? Obverse: The date is low, closer to the dentils than the Truncation. Winter does not mention the light re-punched date or die crack at the date which are evident in this coin. Further observations of variety 1(1-A) coins show that the re-punch and crack while not common are not unusual. However, I have also found mention of varieties 6, 7, and 8 at an auction site that do not show-up in Winter's latest book (2020). Reverse: No shield ring, the mint mark is high and centered between EN in TEN. Winter also states, "The surfaces are nearly always very abraded with most showing deep, detracting marks in the fields... The natural coloration ranges from deep green-gold to rich orange-gold... This is a surprisingly difficult issue to locate with good eye appeal. The typical 1853-O eagle is well struck and shows remaining luster but is usually seen with numerous marks which limit the eye appeal. While this is a common date within this series, nice AU55 and better coins with good eye appeal are much scarcer than generally believed."

1854-O $10 Small Date AU58 PCGS #8614

NGC 4930577-001. NGC graded AU58 - Rare (Listed as a Top-Pop coin by NGC) [Only 3 coins are currently graded in Mint State, (2) MS60, (1) MS61. I believe the MS61 coin is held by the Smithsonian Institution.] Rarity 10th of 21 Per Douglas Winter's "Gold Coins Of The New Orleans Mint". He also states, "While designated as a Small Date, the logotype is actually suggestive of a Medium Date. For years, the Small Date was believed to be the more common of the two 1854-O eagle varieties. We now Know it is a good deal scarcer, especially in high grades... Nearly every known example of this issue is extensively abraded on both sides. Higher grade pieces (AU and above) with choice surfaces are very rare and should command a significant premium." He also says, "The unheralded 1854-O Small Date is the scarcer of the two varieties for this year. It is most often seen in VF and EF grades and it is scarce in the lower AU range. It becomes very scarce in properly graded AU55 and it is rare in AU58. This date is extremely rare in Uncirculated with just 3 or 4 known to me, none of which grade higher than MS61." Garret and Guth's "Encyclopedia Of U.S. Gold Coins" echoes the rarity by stating, "...the Small Date remains scarce in About Uncirculated and is represented by only three or four Mint State examples; none of which graded finer than MS-60." [(1) MS61 today, grade-flated? Smithsonian?] Variety 1(1-A) Obverse; Die scratches are evident at the ERTY in LIBERTY and a late state die crack can be seen at the rim, across the left side of the 8 in the date heading toward the truncation. Reverse: The mint mark is placed high and is equidistant from the arrow feather tip to the talons. With the exception of stars 1,2, and 13, radial lines are evident in the stars. Light high point wear at hair curl at ear, nose, and bun top. Die crack to left side of 8 in the date. Full definition of the eagle's feathers, arrow fletching. Light high point wear at wing tips and olive branch leaves

1854-O $10 Small Date AU58 PCGS #8614

NGC 4930577-001. NGC graded AU58 - Rare (Listed as a Top-Pop coin by NGC) [Only 3 coins are currently graded in Mint State, (2) MS60, (1) MS61. I believe the MS61 coin is held by the Smithsonian Institution.] Rarity 10th of 21 Per Douglas Winter's "Gold Coins Of The New Orleans Mint". He also states, "While designated as a Small Date, the logotype is actually suggestive of a Medium Date. For years, the Small Date was believed to be the more common of the two 1854-O eagle varieties. We now Know it is a good deal scarcer, especially in high grades... Nearly every known example of this issue is extensively abraded on both sides. Higher grade pieces (AU and above) with choice surfaces are very rare and should command a significant premium." He also says, "The unheralded 1854-O Small Date is the scarcer of the two varieties for this year. It is most often seen in VF and EF grades and it is scarce in the lower AU range. It becomes very scarce in properly graded AU55 and it is rare in AU58. This date is extremely rare in Uncirculated with just 3 or 4 known to me, none of which grade higher than MS61." Garret and Guth's "Encyclopedia Of U.S. Gold Coins" echoes the rarity by stating, "...the Small Date remains scarce in About Uncirculated and is represented by only three or four Mint State examples; none of which graded finer than MS-60." [(1) MS61 today, grade-flated? Smithsonian?] Variety 1(1-A) Obverse; Die scratches are evident at the ERTY in LIBERTY and a late state die crack can be seen at the rim, across the left side of the 8 in the date heading toward the truncation. Reverse: The mint mark is placed high and is equidistant from the arrow feather tip to the talons. With the exception of stars 1,2, and 13, radial lines are evident in the stars. Light high point wear at hair curl at ear, nose, and bun top. Die crack to left side of 8 in the date. Full definition of the eagle's feathers, arrow fletching. Light high point wear at wing tips and olive branch leaves

1860 $10 XF40 PCGS #8631

OGH. David Akers "United States Gold Coins - An Analysis Of Auction Records - Volume V - Eagles 1795-1933" comments, "The 1860 is similar in overall rarity to the 1840, 1841, both varieties of 1842 and the 1843 among earlier issues, and the 1851, 1854, 1857 and 1859 among later issues. This means, of course, that it is very rare in any condition. Known specimens are largely spread between the VF and EF grades although there are a small number of AU's and a very few uncirculated specimens known as well." (It should be noted that this was published prior to the S.S. Republic discovery which added 9 relatively high grade coins to the known population.) Akers average grade at the time (1980) was VF-36.

1860 $10 XF40 PCGS #8631

OGH. David Akers "United States Gold Coins - An Analysis Of Auction Records - Volume V - Eagles 1795-1933" comments, "The 1860 is similar in overall rarity to the 1840, 1841, both varieties of 1842 and the 1843 among earlier issues, and the 1851, 1854, 1857 and 1859 among later issues. This means, of course, that it is very rare in any condition. Known specimens are largely spread between the VF and EF grades although there are a small number of AU's and a very few uncirculated specimens known as well." (It should be noted that this was published prior to the S.S. Republic discovery which added 9 relatively high grade coins to the known population.) Akers average grade at the time (1980) was VF-36.

1865-S $10 VF25 PCGS #8642

Normal Date. Although the inverted date coin gets most of the attention, the normal date is the rarer of the two. What appears to be a scratch on the reverse running from the T in TEN, thru the mint mark, to the end of the olive branch and ending at the corner of the lowest arrow head, is in fact a die clash. This can be readily seen on the three AU50 examples shown on PCGS's website. The 5 in the date is noticeably doubled, especially evident at the 5's flag. This coin is significantly under-graded (1-2 steps in my opinion). The coin has significant luster remaining in the protected areas of the legend, around the devices, date and stars. This is in sharp contrast to the given grade. ANA grading standards describe the "EF-40 Surface: Traces of mint luster will show.", while the VF30 does not mention mint luster at all. PCGS's own grading standards describe the XF40 as "All design elements still show, but high points worn flat. Little to no luster remains." The weakness seen on the stars and eagle's neck is explained in Douglas Winter's PCGS write-up, "The quality of the strike is very distinctive with soft radial lines in the stars and a slightly concave appearance on the obverse. The reverse is better struck although many examples show weakness on the neck feathers. I have never seen an 1865-S Normal Date eagle that did not have heavily abraded surfaces and most have enough wear to lack any significant luster." This coin also compares favorably to PCGS's Photograde page for $10 Gold Eagles, VF30 and VF35 (exclusive of the weak eagle neck described above). The observation by Mr. Akers regarding rarity is confirmed when looking at recent auction records from three well known auction houses dating back to 2010. 21 normal date coins have appeared at auction versus 43 inverted date coins over that almost 11 year period. Walter Breen's "Complete Encyclopedia of U.S. And Colonial Coins" describes the 1865-S as ""Type 1" rev. Large S. Doubled rev. Very rare." "Doubling plainest at TEN, United, adjacent wing tips, leaves, feathers." This doubling is very minute needing relatively high magnification to see.

1865-S $10 VF25 PCGS #8642

Normal Date. Although the inverted date coin gets most of the attention, the normal date is the rarer of the two. What appears to be a scratch on the reverse running from the T in TEN, thru the mint mark, to the end of the olive branch and ending at the corner of the lowest arrow head, is in fact a die clash. This can be readily seen on the three AU50 examples shown on PCGS's website. The 5 in the date is noticeably doubled, especially evident at the 5's flag. This coin is significantly under-graded (1-2 steps in my opinion). The coin has significant luster remaining in the protected areas of the legend, around the devices, date and stars. This is in sharp contrast to the given grade. ANA grading standards describe the "EF-40 Surface: Traces of mint luster will show.", while the VF30 does not mention mint luster at all. PCGS's own grading standards describe the XF40 as "All design elements still show, but high points worn flat. Little to no luster remains." The weakness seen on the stars and eagle's neck is explained in Douglas Winter's PCGS write-up, "The quality of the strike is very distinctive with soft radial lines in the stars and a slightly concave appearance on the obverse. The reverse is better struck although many examples show weakness on the neck feathers. I have never seen an 1865-S Normal Date eagle that did not have heavily abraded surfaces and most have enough wear to lack any significant luster." This coin also compares favorably to PCGS's Photograde page for $10 Gold Eagles, VF30 and VF35 (exclusive of the weak eagle neck described above). The observation by Mr. Akers regarding rarity is confirmed when looking at recent auction records from three well known auction houses dating back to 2010. 21 normal date coins have appeared at auction versus 43 inverted date coins over that almost 11 year period. Walter Breen's "Complete Encyclopedia of U.S. And Colonial Coins" describes the 1865-S as ""Type 1" rev. Large S. Doubled rev. Very rare." "Doubling plainest at TEN, United, adjacent wing tips, leaves, feathers." This doubling is very minute needing relatively high magnification to see.

1865-S $10 VF25 PCGS #8642

Normal Date. Although the inverted date coin gets most of the attention, the normal date is the rarer of the two. What appears to be a scratch on the reverse running from the T in TEN, thru the mint mark, to the end of the olive branch and ending at the corner of the lowest arrow head, is in fact a die clash. This can be readily seen on the three AU50 examples shown on PCGS's website. The 5 in the date is noticeably doubled, especially evident at the 5's flag. This coin is significantly under-graded (1-2 steps in my opinion). The coin has significant luster remaining in the protected areas of the legend, around the devices, date and stars. This is in sharp contrast to the given grade. ANA grading standards describe the "EF-40 Surface: Traces of mint luster will show.", while the VF30 does not mention mint luster at all. PCGS's own grading standards describe the XF40 as "All design elements still show, but high points worn flat. Little to no luster remains." The weakness seen on the stars and eagle's neck is explained in Douglas Winter's PCGS write-up, "The quality of the strike is very distinctive with soft radial lines in the stars and a slightly concave appearance on the obverse. The reverse is better struck although many examples show weakness on the neck feathers. I have never seen an 1865-S Normal Date eagle that did not have heavily abraded surfaces and most have enough wear to lack any significant luster." This coin also compares favorably to PCGS's Photograde page for $10 Gold Eagles, VF30 and VF35 (exclusive of the weak eagle neck described above). The observation by Mr. Akers regarding rarity is confirmed when looking at recent auction records from three well known auction houses dating back to 2010. 21 normal date coins have appeared at auction versus 43 inverted date coins over that almost 11 year period. Walter Breen's "Complete Encyclopedia of U.S. And Colonial Coins" describes the 1865-S as ""Type 1" rev. Large S. Doubled rev. Very rare." "Doubling plainest at TEN, United, adjacent wing tips, leaves, feathers." This doubling is very minute needing relatively high magnification to see.

1865-S $10 VF25 PCGS #8642

Normal Date. Although the inverted date coin gets most of the attention, the normal date is the rarer of the two. What appears to be a scratch on the reverse running from the T in TEN, thru the mint mark, to the end of the olive branch and ending at the corner of the lowest arrow head, is in fact a die clash. This can be readily seen on the three AU50 examples shown on PCGS's website. The 5 in the date is noticeably doubled, especially evident at the 5's flag. This coin is significantly under-graded (1-2 steps in my opinion). The coin has significant luster remaining in the protected areas of the legend, around the devices, date and stars. This is in sharp contrast to the given grade. ANA grading standards describe the "EF-40 Surface: Traces of mint luster will show.", while the VF30 does not mention mint luster at all. PCGS's own grading standards describe the XF40 as "All design elements still show, but high points worn flat. Little to no luster remains." The weakness seen on the stars and eagle's neck is explained in Douglas Winter's PCGS write-up, "The quality of the strike is very distinctive with soft radial lines in the stars and a slightly concave appearance on the obverse. The reverse is better struck although many examples show weakness on the neck feathers. I have never seen an 1865-S Normal Date eagle that did not have heavily abraded surfaces and most have enough wear to lack any significant luster." This coin also compares favorably to PCGS's Photograde page for $10 Gold Eagles, VF30 and VF35 (exclusive of the weak eagle neck described above). The observation by Mr. Akers regarding rarity is confirmed when looking at recent auction records from three well known auction houses dating back to 2010. 21 normal date coins have appeared at auction versus 43 inverted date coins over that almost 11 year period. Walter Breen's "Complete Encyclopedia of U.S. And Colonial Coins" describes the 1865-S as ""Type 1" rev. Large S. Doubled rev. Very rare." "Doubling plainest at TEN, United, adjacent wing tips, leaves, feathers." This doubling is very minute needing relatively high magnification to see.

1876-S $10 XF40 PCGS #8676

Garrett and Guth's "Encyclopedia Of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933" states, "The 1876-S eagle is difficult to obtain in any grade and is an extremely popular date because of the low mintage (tied for second lowest at the San Francisco Mint). Most of the certified examples fall into the Extremely Fine and About Uncirculated categories, with none graded at the Mint State level." Walter Breen's "Complete Encyclopedia of U.S. and Colonial Coins" identifies the 1876-S eagle as "Very Rare". His book was published in 1987, probably before some repatriations which may have increased the known examples. Likewise David Aker's Auction Analysis "Volume V - Eagles 1795-1933" (published in 1980) comments, "The mintage of the 1876-S is the second lowest from the San Francisco Mint (tied with the 1860-S) and so it comes as no surprise that this date is very rare in any condition... In terms of condition rarity, the 1876-S is near the top of the series, ranking in the top 10% of all $10 issues. The typical grade for this very rare date is VF and there are more that grade below VF than above it." His Average Grade at the time was VF24. The PCGS website population report suggest the population is 75 while the Estimated Survival section indicates a population of about 77.

1876-S $10 XF40 PCGS #8676

Garrett and Guth's "Encyclopedia Of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933" states, "The 1876-S eagle is difficult to obtain in any grade and is an extremely popular date because of the low mintage (tied for second lowest at the San Francisco Mint). Most of the certified examples fall into the Extremely Fine and About Uncirculated categories, with none graded at the Mint State level." Walter Breen's "Complete Encyclopedia of U.S. and Colonial Coins" identifies the 1876-S eagle as "Very Rare". His book was published in 1987, probably before some repatriations which may have increased the known examples. Likewise David Aker's Auction Analysis "Volume V - Eagles 1795-1933" (published in 1980) comments, "The mintage of the 1876-S is the second lowest from the San Francisco Mint (tied with the 1860-S) and so it comes as no surprise that this date is very rare in any condition... In terms of condition rarity, the 1876-S is near the top of the series, ranking in the top 10% of all $10 issues. The typical grade for this very rare date is VF and there are more that grade below VF than above it." His Average Grade at the time was VF24. The PCGS website population report suggest the population is 75 while the Estimated Survival section indicates a population of about 77.

1876-S $10 XF40 PCGS #8676

Garrett and Guth's "Encyclopedia Of U.S. Gold Coins 1795-1933" states, "The 1876-S eagle is difficult to obtain in any grade and is an extremely popular date because of the low mintage (tied for second lowest at the San Francisco Mint). Most of the certified examples fall into the Extremely Fine and About Uncirculated categories, with none graded at the Mint State level." Walter Breen's "Complete Encyclopedia of U.S. and Colonial Coins" identifies the 1876-S eagle as "Very Rare". His book was published in 1987, probably before some repatriations which may have increased the known examples. Likewise David Aker's Auction Analysis "Volume V - Eagles 1795-1933" (published in 1980) comments, "The mintage of the 1876-S is the second lowest from the San Francisco Mint (tied with the 1860-S) and so it comes as no surprise that this date is very rare in any condition... In terms of condition rarity, the 1876-S is near the top of the series, ranking in the top 10% of all $10 issues. The typical grade for this very rare date is VF and there are more that grade below VF than above it." His Average Grade at the time was VF24. The PCGS website population report suggest the population is 75 while the Estimated Survival section indicates a population of about 77.

1880-O $10 XF45 PCGS #8689

Variety 1 (1-A) - Obverse - Date slightly closer to bust than dentils and just left of center. Stars on left show minor doubling. Reverse - Mintmark is high and equidistant between arrow feather and talon. Die lines are evident at dentils at CA. Rarity 3rd of 16.

1880-O $10 XF45 PCGS #8689

Variety 1 (1-A) - Obverse - Date slightly closer to bust than dentils and just left of center. Stars on left show minor doubling. Reverse - Mintmark is high and equidistant between arrow feather and talon. Die lines are evident at dentils at CA. Rarity 3rd of 16.

1857-S $20 AU58+ PCGS #8922

This appears to be a late die state variety 20B - Bold S - although I do not have sufficient information to verify this. The coin IS NOT an SS Central AMERICA relic. Reverse shows - mintmark upper loop almost closed and the left side of the mintmark is positioned midway over the left serif of the N in TWENTY (position 55). The left serif of the U in UNITED tapers to a point. The crossbar of the A in STATES tapers to the left. The E in AMERICA is broken at the top and the R upper serif tapers to a pointed short terminus. (information retrieved from "A Wealth of Double Eagle Die Varieties" by Robert Evens ANA 169268, printed in "The Numismatist" July 2000.)

1857-S $20 AU58+ PCGS #8922

This appears to be a late die state variety 20B - Bold S - although I do not have sufficient information to verify this. The coin IS NOT an SS Central AMERICA relic. Reverse shows - mintmark upper loop almost closed and the left side of the mintmark is positioned midway over the left serif of the N in TWENTY (position 55). The left serif of the U in UNITED tapers to a point. The crossbar of the A in STATES tapers to the left. The E in AMERICA is broken at the top and the R upper serif tapers to a pointed short terminus. (information retrieved from "A Wealth of Double Eagle Die Varieties" by Robert Evens ANA 169268, printed in "The Numismatist" July 2000.)

1872 $20 AU55 PCGS #8963

NGC 5895176-001. Evenly worn without significant "chatter" or bag marks and no heavy contact marks.

1872 $20 AU55 PCGS #8963

NGC 5895176-001. Evenly worn without significant "chatter" or bag marks and no heavy contact marks.

1883-CC $20 XF45 PCGS #8999

NGC 4686876-001. Per Douglas Winter's "Gold Coins of the Carson City Mint" overall rarity is 14th of 19 and the condition rarity is 12th of 19. I have not been able to identify the obverse variety of this coin. The reverse appears to be a reverse A with the second C over the left edge of the D. Very good eye appeal with luster remaining in protected areas.

1883-CC $20 XF45 PCGS #8999

NGC 4686876-001. Per Douglas Winter's "Gold Coins of the Carson City Mint" overall rarity is 14th of 19 and the condition rarity is 12th of 19. I have not been able to identify the obverse variety of this coin. The reverse appears to be a reverse A with the second C over the left edge of the D. Very good eye appeal with luster remaining in protected areas.

1899-S $20 MS62 PCGS #9036

Superior luster remaining in all areas of the coin. A single moderate contact mark on Liberty's chin.

1899-S $20 MS62 PCGS #9036

Superior luster remaining in all areas of the coin. A single moderate contact mark on Liberty's chin.