lkeigwin's Coin Album

1802 1C 1/000 XF40BN PCGS #36341

S-228. State I.

1807 50C Large Stars AU53 PCGS #6088

O.114, R3. 1807 is the birth year of the capped bust half, though it shared the year with the last of the draped busts. Officially 750k were minted but most believe the true number to be less than half that (all that from just four die marriages?). Strike is usually soft due to the inherent weaknesses of the design. But these weaknesses (dentils, LIBERTY, stars, clasp, scroll, etc.) are very inconsistent. Which makes accurate grading a real challenge. This variety is sometimes called the real large stars, not the more common O.112 that PCGS also calls large stars but is properly known as 50/20 variety.

1808 50C VF35 PCGS #39377

O.110a, R4+

1808 50C AU58 PCGS #39375

O.109a, R3.

1809 50C III Edge AU58 PCGS #39389

O.111a, R2. Ex-Tom Sears, bought Feb 2017 HA $4700.

1810 50C AU55 PCGS #39408

O.103, R2

1812 50C MS62 PCGS #39455

O.109, R2. Ex-chuck Link

1813 50C MS62 PCGS #39471

O.109, R3. LDS and probably equivalent to O.109a R5, the so-called single leaf. Through either excessive die wear or die lapping, as evidenced here, the 2nd leaf has been lost. On high grade specimens like this a trace of the 2nd leaf often shows.

1813 50C MS62 PCGS #6103

O.103, R2.

1814 50C AU55 PCGS #6105

O.107, R2. Heavily clashed like so many 1814's, this CBH has superior luster and a pretty, lightly toned look with subtle gold, russet, and turquoise colors. Very conservatively graded. Star 13 has the requisite extension on the end point near the curl . A rough die break can be seen to the left of stars 10 & 11.

1817 50C AU58 PCGS #6109

O.110, R2.

1818 50C AU58+ PCGS #6113

O.104a, R3. CAC.

1819 50C AU55 PCGS #39553

O.114, R3.

1819 50C AU58+ PCGS #39544

O.108, R3. CAC.

1821 50C AU58 PCGS #6128

O.103, R2. Broken serifs on E, A. Was NGC AU58 cert# 332790-023

1821 50C AU58 PCGS #39585

R1. Ex-Link.

1822 50C AU58 PCGS #39591

O.106, R3. Ex-Eliasberg, ex Dr. Charles Link.

1824 50C MS65+ PCGS #6137

O.105, R2. CAC.

1825 50C AU55 PCGS #6142

O.115, R3

1825 50C MS62 PCGS #39661

O.114, R1. Ex-Tom Sears. WAS NGC 63+ cert# 3814561-004.

1825 50C MS62 PCGS #6142

O.102, R1.

1825 50C MS62+ PCGS #39649

O.103, R4-. Catalog description: From the Dr. Charles Link Collection, noted on the PCGS label. Electric blue and gold circles the rims of this dazzling coin. Gaudy luster permeates the fields and devices, lending exceptional eye appeal to the coin. The `25-103 is a genuinely scarce die pair. This example is likely 4th or 5th finest known, a worthy addition to either a date or variety set.

1826 50C AU58 PCGS #39694

O.120, R4-. Ex-Tom Hartl

1826 50C MS62 PCGS #39685

O.114, R4+

1827 50C Square Base 2 AU55 PCGS #6144

O.118, R3. Ex-Hartl. Catalog description: A hint of amber toning crosses the brilliant surfaces. This is another coin that was dipped to bring out its luster. The surfaces are immaculate, the strike first rate. Needs one more notch of “flash” to earn a higher grade.

1827 50C Square Base 2 AU58 PCGS #6144

O.120a, R3 (R4 die state). Was NGC MS61.

1827 50C Square Base 2 AU58+ PCGS #39720

O.122, R5. CAC. Cataloger's description: From the Dr. Charles Link collection, earlier in the Frederick collection, as noted on the PCGS label. Here is one of the 2 or 3 most important coins in the sale. Frederick’s 2x2 envelope accompanies. He wrote (in July 1980), “Easily the finest known of this very rare variety. Beautifully toned and choicely preserved, AU/AU+.” One uncirculated example has since surfaced, the De Olden PCGS MS 64, offered in MB 32, June 2006, lot 83, @$9,533. The Frederick/Link coin stays at #2 in the Condition Census, tied with the Meyer coin, also graded PCGS AU 58 (sold privately in July 2008 for $5,800). The toning on the current example is otherworldly! Preview is necessary. Any description will fall short, but must allude to the rose colored centers, surrounded by electric shades of turquoise and blue. Contact marks are absent. Cartwheel luster is undiminished in the fields. There is but a trace of friction on Liberty’s cheek.

1827 50C Square Base 2 MS64+ PCGS #6144

O.126, R2. CAC.

1828 50C Square 2, Small 8, Large Letters MS62 PCGS #39765

O.111, R4. Catalog description: From the collection of Dr. Charles Link, noted on the PCGS label. Outrageous toning will draw oohs and ahs from those previewing the lot. Luster shimmers beneath a rainbow of iridescent colors. The surfaces are smooth as glass. And, yes, this IS an O.111, right behind the 1828 O.105 and 123 in the list of rare 1828’s. Cherry pickers look for the jagged die break joining the top drapery line to Liberty’s curls. Steve Herrman (AMBPR) identifies three other UNCs, providing assurance that this is a Condition Census offering. Its rarity in high grade is no secret.

1829 50C AU50 PCGS #39781

O.103, R1.

1829 50C AU53 PCGS #39791

O.110, R2.

1829 50C AU53 PCGS #39802

O.116a, R3. Catalog description: Ex Dr. Charles Link, noted on the PCGS label. Scarce die state, with obverse and reverse die breaks described in Overton. The mildly reflective surfaces are toned in iridescent hues of grey and copper, enhanced by tasty morsels of turquoise. Exceptional eye appeal for a 53. Plucked from BHNC’s members-only auction, June 12, 2011.

1829 50C AU58 PCGS #39799

O.114, R3. Ex Dr. Charles Link.

1829 50C MS61 PCGS #6154

O.115, R1. Small letters. Was NGC MS61. Catalog description: The fully lustrous surfaces are bathed in delicate, translucent pale copper toning. The strike is every bit as nice as the preceding MS 64. There is a trace of friction on the cheek. My guess is that NGC found the eye appeal of this little beauty to be adequate compensation. This is a very nice, well struck 1829. If you plan to cross it to PCGS expect an AU 58 and hope for better.

1831 50C F12 PCGS #39857

O.112, R6.

1831 50C AU58 PCGS #39839

O.103, R1.

1831 50C AU58 PCGS #39844

O.108, R3.

1831 50C MS64 PCGS #6159

O.114, R3. CAC. Catalog description: Flamboyant rainbow toning encircles both sides of this vibrant near-Gem half. Brightly lustrous, shades of amber-gold, sea-green, sky-blue, and lavender provide a dazzling display on both sides. Frosty luster beams from the finely granular surfaces, which show a scattering of light abrasions but no serious marks. The strike is sharp except on the eagle's right (facing) talons. CAC endorsed, the eye appeal is terrific. Tied for finest of the variety according to both the Steve Herrman and Donald Parsley census listings.

1832 50C Small Letters AU58+ PCGS #6160

O.121, R3. Was NGC MS61.

1832 50C Large Letters MS63 PCGS #39886

O.101a, R1. Ex-Dale Friend Aside from some oddities with chin/neck dots and laced lips, 1832 has one significant variety. The unique large letters reverse. It was the second to last die set used in the 1832 ('33 used two '32 dies). The 101 LL variety is easy to spot. It has a large die break running through the left wing to where the tail meets the leaves.

1836/1336 50C Lettered Edge AU58 PCGS #39957

O.108a, R2. 1836/1336. One oddity to the O.108 variety is a doubling of the clasp. It is not known if this was done to test metal flow. The clasp is often weak, being directly opposite eagle's head. Or perhaps it was just fanciful design by the engraver. Interestingly this doubling appears on two different obverse dies. But the O.108 is known for a more obvious error: a 3 was mistakenly punched in the date instead of an 8. As luck would have it, the 8 overlaid the 3 almost perfectly. Only the ball from the underlying 3 shows in the 8's lower loop. Strictly speaking this isn't an overdate. No early die from another year was used. But the same could be said about many CBH's that are accepted as overdates. The a die state is attributed by the die crack at the base of the date, and another joining the right side stars.

1793 Chain 1C AMERICA FR2BN PCGS #1341

S-2, R4 . Heritage Auctions FUN 2018: The first copper coins struck at the fledgling U.S. Mint in Philadelphia were the Chain cents, beginning with Sheldon-1, the famous Chain AMERI. cent. Using the same obverse die and a new reverse die with AMERICA spelled in full, the Sheldon-2 cents, including this example, were struck next. These were followed by a small number of Sheldon NC-1 cents, a large number of Sheldon-3 cents, and finally, the Sheldon-4 Periods cents that had a small period following the date and LIBERTY. In his Large Cent Encyclopedia, Walter Breen suggested that the first two varieties were delivered on March 1, 1793. Although there is no proof, current rarity ratings support his hypothesis. If current rarity ratings are proportional to the number of coins struck, the mintage for this variety was about 3,400 coins. Obverse diagnostics based on E relative to hairline. Fraction bar on reverse is high, distant from small numerals.

1793 Chain 1C AMERICA FR2BN PCGS #1341

S-2, R4 . Heritage Auctions FUN 2018: The first copper coins struck at the fledgling U.S. Mint in Philadelphia were the Chain cents, beginning with Sheldon-1, the famous Chain AMERI. cent. Using the same obverse die and a new reverse die with AMERICA spelled in full, the Sheldon-2 cents, including this example, were struck next. These were followed by a small number of Sheldon NC-1 cents, a large number of Sheldon-3 cents, and finally, the Sheldon-4 Periods cents that had a small period following the date and LIBERTY. In his Large Cent Encyclopedia, Walter Breen suggested that the first two varieties were delivered on March 1, 1793. Although there is no proof, current rarity ratings support his hypothesis. If current rarity ratings are proportional to the number of coins struck, the mintage for this variety was about 3,400 coins. Obverse diagnostics based on E relative to hairline. Fraction bar on reverse is high, distant from small numerals.

1793 Wreath 1C Vine and Bars Edge G4BN PCGS #1347

S-8, R3-. Stem of sprig parallel to top of date (obverse 9). High, heavy, triangular bow (reverse G).

1793 Wreath 1C Vine and Bars Edge G4BN PCGS #1347

S-8, R3-. Stem of sprig parallel to top of date (obverse 9). High, heavy, triangular bow (reverse G).

1794 1C Head of 1795 F12BN PCGS #1365

S-65, R1. Misattributed. Shielded hair variety. Head of 1794, not 1795 (PCGS error). Die pair typically weak on right side and strong on left. Right ribbon is short, ending abruptly. 7 berries left, 6 right. PCGS 5 OGH

1794 1C Head of 1795 F12BN PCGS #1365

S-65, R1. Misattributed. Shielded hair variety. Head of 1794, not 1795 (PCGS error). Die pair typically weak on right side and strong on left. Right ribbon is short, ending abruptly. 7 berries left, 6 right. PCGS 5 OGH

1794 50C F15 PCGS #6051

O.101a (T-7), R3. Ex-Jim Ross.

1794 50C F15 PCGS #6051

O.101a (T-7), R3. Ex-Jim Ross.

1795 1C Plain Edge AG3BN PCGS #35723

S-76b, R1. Half of top of 5 embedded in bust, ONE CENT high in the wreath.

1795 1C Plain Edge AG3BN PCGS #35723

S-76b, R1. Half of top of 5 embedded in bust, ONE CENT high in the wreath.

1795 1C Plain Edge VF20BN PCGS #1380

S-78, R1. Top of 5 barely touches bust. 3 berries right branch, 4 left (only 1795 with fewer than 9 berries).

1795 1C Plain Edge VF20BN PCGS #1380

S-78, R1. Top of 5 barely touches bust. 3 berries right branch, 4 left (only 1795 with fewer than 9 berries).

1796 1C Reverse of 1797 G6BN PCGS #35870

S-119, R3. Compact date, CENT touches side leaves, double leaf under D, outside berry under stand of E.

1796 1C Reverse of 1797 G6BN PCGS #35870

S-119, R3. Compact date, CENT touches side leaves, double leaf under D, outside berry under stand of E.

1796 1C Liberty Cap F15BN PCGS #35774

S-89, R3+. L, 1, 6 almost touch cap, hair, bust. Double leaf left of ONE, triple leaf at T in CENT.

1796 1C Liberty Cap F15BN PCGS #35774

S-89, R3+. L, 1, 6 almost touch cap, hair, bust. Double leaf left of ONE, triple leaf at T in CENT.

1797 1C Rev of 1797, Stems VG10BN PCGS #35924

S-128, die state b. F12 details. Net grade VG8. Both points of 7 touch drapery, 1 touches hair.

1797 1C Rev of 1797, Stems VG10BN PCGS #35924

S-128, die state b. F12 details. Net grade VG8. Both points of 7 touch drapery, 1 touches hair.

1798 1C 1st Hair Style VF20BN PCGS #36035

S-157. Type I hair. Deep chocolate brown with mostly smooth surfaces. Typical weakness on the reverse. Very high CQR value. 3 fused denials below 9. Wide fraction, 1 and 0 far apart.

1798 1C 1st Hair Style VF20BN PCGS #36035

S-157. Type I hair. Deep chocolate brown with mostly smooth surfaces. Typical weakness on the reverse. Very high CQR value. 3 fused denials below 9. Wide fraction, 1 and 0 far apart.

1799 1C G6BN PCGS #36140

S-189. Medium to dark brown. Strong obverse that grades VG on its own with weaker reverse, with all legends visible on the reverse however. Some minor marks, including a tiny nick below 7, and a few tiny digs left of the fraction. About 60% of the date shows. A superior planchet for a 1799. From the collection of Ron Janowsky, EAC #166. Purchased by Ron in the mid 1980s, and consigned to Tom Reynolds after Ron's passing. Comes with Tom's yellow envelope simply reading 1799 S-189.

1799 1C G6BN PCGS #36140

S-189. Medium to dark brown. Strong obverse that grades VG on its own with weaker reverse, with all legends visible on the reverse however. Some minor marks, including a tiny nick below 7, and a few tiny digs left of the fraction. About 60% of the date shows. A superior planchet for a 1799. From the collection of Ron Janowsky, EAC #166. Purchased by Ron in the mid 1980s, and consigned to Tom Reynolds after Ron's passing. Comes with Tom's yellow envelope simply reading 1799 S-189.

1799 $1 VF30 PCGS #6878

BB-161, B-11. No Berries variety. Die state III.

1799 $1 VF30 PCGS #6878

BB-161, B-11. No Berries variety. Die state III.

1800 1C F15BN PCGS #1449

S-209, R3. The stray vertical hair between the top two curls below the ribbon and right-leaning E confirm the variety. Cracked for Dansco.

1800 1C F15BN PCGS #1449

S-209, R3. The stray vertical hair between the top two curls below the ribbon and right-leaning E confirm the variety. Cracked for Dansco.

1802 1C VG10BN PCGS #1470

S-233. Crossed from yellow ANACS #4418579. Cracked for Dansco. PCGS# 36308.

1802 1C VG10BN PCGS #1470

S-233. Crossed from yellow ANACS #4418579. Cracked for Dansco. PCGS# 36308.

1802 1C 1/000 XF40BN PCGS #36341

S-228. State I.

1802 1C 1/000 XF40BN PCGS #36341

S-228. State I.

1803 1C Small Date, Small Fraction VF25BN PCGS #1482

S-250 with a fading shoulder line with the POC under the curve of B. The Reverse H had a distinctly low fraction bar and a stemless berry under E(D). Was old ANACS VF25 #2561743. Cracked out for Dansco

1803 1C Small Date, Small Fraction VF25BN PCGS #1482

S-250 with a fading shoulder line with the POC under the curve of B. The Reverse H had a distinctly low fraction bar and a stemless berry under E(D). Was old ANACS VF25 #2561743. Cracked out for Dansco

1804 1C VG8BN PCGS #1504

S-266 state C. Only die pair. R2. Scarce late die state with both obverse and reverse cuds.

1804 1C VG8BN PCGS #1504

S-266 state C. Only die pair. R2. Scarce late die state with both obverse and reverse cuds.

1805 1C F12BN PCGS #1510

S-267 blunt 1 and PHL (point of highest leaf) left side of S. Crossed from yellow ANACS #4418582. Cracked for Dansco.

1805 1C F12BN PCGS #1510

S-267 blunt 1 and PHL (point of highest leaf) left side of S. Crossed from yellow ANACS #4418582. Cracked for Dansco.

1806 1C F15BN PCGS #1513

S-270, R1. Only known dies.

1806 1C F15BN PCGS #1513

S-270, R1. Only known dies.

1807 1C Small Fraction F12BN PCGS #1534

S-274 perfect date, mount at sta, phl midway between E and S.

1807 1C Small Fraction F12BN PCGS #1534

S-274 perfect date, mount at sta, phl midway between E and S.

1807 50C Bearded Goddess F15 PCGS #39357

O.111b, R4. CAC. Catalog description (was NGC VF20 cert# 1981275-001): The 1807 Bearded Goddess best of all worlds for Bust half collectors. The design is the two-year Capped Bust type by John Reich, and the O-111b variety features the popular 50/20 reverse at the denomination, with the five struck over a partially effaced 2. But the main attraction is the dominant die crack most visible between Liberty's chin and chest. On high-grade, late die state coins the crack is visible from the headband, through the eye and face, and traveling downward across the bust to the left of the date. On moderately circulated coins such as the current example, the main break beneath the chin remains clear and dramatic. Gunmetal blue accents enhance the old-silver appeal of this smoothly worn bearded lady. A tiny planchet flaw between R and I of AMERICA on the reverse does not distract from the substantial appeal.

1807 50C Bearded Goddess F15 PCGS #39357

O.111b, R4. CAC. Catalog description (was NGC VF20 cert# 1981275-001): The 1807 Bearded Goddess best of all worlds for Bust half collectors. The design is the two-year Capped Bust type by John Reich, and the O-111b variety features the popular 50/20 reverse at the denomination, with the five struck over a partially effaced 2. But the main attraction is the dominant die crack most visible between Liberty's chin and chest. On high-grade, late die state coins the crack is visible from the headband, through the eye and face, and traveling downward across the bust to the left of the date. On moderately circulated coins such as the current example, the main break beneath the chin remains clear and dramatic. Gunmetal blue accents enhance the old-silver appeal of this smoothly worn bearded lady. A tiny planchet flaw between R and I of AMERICA on the reverse does not distract from the substantial appeal.

1807 50C Bearded Goddess F15 PCGS #39357

O.111b, R4. CAC. Catalog description (was NGC VF20 cert# 1981275-001): The 1807 Bearded Goddess best of all worlds for Bust half collectors. The design is the two-year Capped Bust type by John Reich, and the O-111b variety features the popular 50/20 reverse at the denomination, with the five struck over a partially effaced 2. But the main attraction is the dominant die crack most visible between Liberty's chin and chest. On high-grade, late die state coins the crack is visible from the headband, through the eye and face, and traveling downward across the bust to the left of the date. On moderately circulated coins such as the current example, the main break beneath the chin remains clear and dramatic. Gunmetal blue accents enhance the old-silver appeal of this smoothly worn bearded lady. A tiny planchet flaw between R and I of AMERICA on the reverse does not distract from the substantial appeal.

1807 50C Large Stars XF45 PCGS #6088

O.114, R3. From the R.E. Cox collection. Catalog description: Robert Earl Cox was the preeminent collector of United States Half-Dollars in the years preceding Stack’s sale of his collection in April 1962. (Metro. NY Numis. Conv. Sale, April 26-28, 1962.) His virtually complete collection encompassed the gamut of 50¢ pieces. It commenced with a VF specimen in copper of Peter Getz’ 1792 depiction of George Washington and ended with a date set of uncirculated and proof Franklin half-dollars. It included patterns, errors, die and hub trials, fantasy pieces, commemoratives halves and the territorial issues of Hawaii. Cox displayed his half-dollars in sturdy cardboard holders made by Art Craft. The holders were individually prepared. Each shows the date and denomination along with the Beistle attribution, the common name of the variety, if any, and a word or two about characteristics of the die pair. Thin black tape was used to seal the edges and provide a narrow frame for the holder. Cox purchased this coin from B. Max Mehl January 2, 1958. A page from his ledger shows the cost, $50 plus $4.75 for the Art Craft holder. Cox graded the coin “XF.” On the holder he notes that this is Beistle’s variety 12-J, the Large Stars 1807, and that it may be identified by “Small lumps die defect below ‘7.’” The coin is beautiful though lightly wiped. After nearly 60 years in cardboard the obverse has acquired otherworldly hues of iridescent cobalt, blue and russet. The reverse is more lightly toned, featuring subtle shades of auburn and a half-moon of iridescence through the right-side periphery. Luster dances across both sides, suggesting a grade of XF 45 in today’s parlance. When offering the Cox Collection in April 1962 Stack’s provided a terse, uninspiring description of lot 1777: 1807 B.12J. Large Stars. Extremely Fine. Quite scarce. It sold for $45. I have encountered but two examples of Cox’ half-dollars still encased in their original Art Craft holders.

1807 50C Large Stars XF45 PCGS #6088

O.114, R3. From the R.E. Cox collection. Catalog description: Robert Earl Cox was the preeminent collector of United States Half-Dollars in the years preceding Stack’s sale of his collection in April 1962. (Metro. NY Numis. Conv. Sale, April 26-28, 1962.) His virtually complete collection encompassed the gamut of 50¢ pieces. It commenced with a VF specimen in copper of Peter Getz’ 1792 depiction of George Washington and ended with a date set of uncirculated and proof Franklin half-dollars. It included patterns, errors, die and hub trials, fantasy pieces, commemoratives halves and the territorial issues of Hawaii. Cox displayed his half-dollars in sturdy cardboard holders made by Art Craft. The holders were individually prepared. Each shows the date and denomination along with the Beistle attribution, the common name of the variety, if any, and a word or two about characteristics of the die pair. Thin black tape was used to seal the edges and provide a narrow frame for the holder. Cox purchased this coin from B. Max Mehl January 2, 1958. A page from his ledger shows the cost, $50 plus $4.75 for the Art Craft holder. Cox graded the coin “XF.” On the holder he notes that this is Beistle’s variety 12-J, the Large Stars 1807, and that it may be identified by “Small lumps die defect below ‘7.’” The coin is beautiful though lightly wiped. After nearly 60 years in cardboard the obverse has acquired otherworldly hues of iridescent cobalt, blue and russet. The reverse is more lightly toned, featuring subtle shades of auburn and a half-moon of iridescence through the right-side periphery. Luster dances across both sides, suggesting a grade of XF 45 in today’s parlance. When offering the Cox Collection in April 1962 Stack’s provided a terse, uninspiring description of lot 1777: 1807 B.12J. Large Stars. Extremely Fine. Quite scarce. It sold for $45. I have encountered but two examples of Cox’ half-dollars still encased in their original Art Craft holders.

1807 50C Large Stars XF45 PCGS #6088

O.114, R3. From the R.E. Cox collection. Catalog description: Robert Earl Cox was the preeminent collector of United States Half-Dollars in the years preceding Stack’s sale of his collection in April 1962. (Metro. NY Numis. Conv. Sale, April 26-28, 1962.) His virtually complete collection encompassed the gamut of 50¢ pieces. It commenced with a VF specimen in copper of Peter Getz’ 1792 depiction of George Washington and ended with a date set of uncirculated and proof Franklin half-dollars. It included patterns, errors, die and hub trials, fantasy pieces, commemoratives halves and the territorial issues of Hawaii. Cox displayed his half-dollars in sturdy cardboard holders made by Art Craft. The holders were individually prepared. Each shows the date and denomination along with the Beistle attribution, the common name of the variety, if any, and a word or two about characteristics of the die pair. Thin black tape was used to seal the edges and provide a narrow frame for the holder. Cox purchased this coin from B. Max Mehl January 2, 1958. A page from his ledger shows the cost, $50 plus $4.75 for the Art Craft holder. Cox graded the coin “XF.” On the holder he notes that this is Beistle’s variety 12-J, the Large Stars 1807, and that it may be identified by “Small lumps die defect below ‘7.’” The coin is beautiful though lightly wiped. After nearly 60 years in cardboard the obverse has acquired otherworldly hues of iridescent cobalt, blue and russet. The reverse is more lightly toned, featuring subtle shades of auburn and a half-moon of iridescence through the right-side periphery. Luster dances across both sides, suggesting a grade of XF 45 in today’s parlance. When offering the Cox Collection in April 1962 Stack’s provided a terse, uninspiring description of lot 1777: 1807 B.12J. Large Stars. Extremely Fine. Quite scarce. It sold for $45. I have encountered but two examples of Cox’ half-dollars still encased in their original Art Craft holders.

1807 50C Large Stars XF45 PCGS #6088

O.114, R3. From the R.E. Cox collection. Catalog description: Robert Earl Cox was the preeminent collector of United States Half-Dollars in the years preceding Stack’s sale of his collection in April 1962. (Metro. NY Numis. Conv. Sale, April 26-28, 1962.) His virtually complete collection encompassed the gamut of 50¢ pieces. It commenced with a VF specimen in copper of Peter Getz’ 1792 depiction of George Washington and ended with a date set of uncirculated and proof Franklin half-dollars. It included patterns, errors, die and hub trials, fantasy pieces, commemoratives halves and the territorial issues of Hawaii. Cox displayed his half-dollars in sturdy cardboard holders made by Art Craft. The holders were individually prepared. Each shows the date and denomination along with the Beistle attribution, the common name of the variety, if any, and a word or two about characteristics of the die pair. Thin black tape was used to seal the edges and provide a narrow frame for the holder. Cox purchased this coin from B. Max Mehl January 2, 1958. A page from his ledger shows the cost, $50 plus $4.75 for the Art Craft holder. Cox graded the coin “XF.” On the holder he notes that this is Beistle’s variety 12-J, the Large Stars 1807, and that it may be identified by “Small lumps die defect below ‘7.’” The coin is beautiful though lightly wiped. After nearly 60 years in cardboard the obverse has acquired otherworldly hues of iridescent cobalt, blue and russet. The reverse is more lightly toned, featuring subtle shades of auburn and a half-moon of iridescence through the right-side periphery. Luster dances across both sides, suggesting a grade of XF 45 in today’s parlance. When offering the Cox Collection in April 1962 Stack’s provided a terse, uninspiring description of lot 1777: 1807 B.12J. Large Stars. Extremely Fine. Quite scarce. It sold for $45. I have encountered but two examples of Cox’ half-dollars still encased in their original Art Craft holders.

1807 50C Large Stars XF45 PCGS #6088

O.114, R3. From the R.E. Cox collection. Catalog description: Robert Earl Cox was the preeminent collector of United States Half-Dollars in the years preceding Stack’s sale of his collection in April 1962. (Metro. NY Numis. Conv. Sale, April 26-28, 1962.) His virtually complete collection encompassed the gamut of 50¢ pieces. It commenced with a VF specimen in copper of Peter Getz’ 1792 depiction of George Washington and ended with a date set of uncirculated and proof Franklin half-dollars. It included patterns, errors, die and hub trials, fantasy pieces, commemoratives halves and the territorial issues of Hawaii. Cox displayed his half-dollars in sturdy cardboard holders made by Art Craft. The holders were individually prepared. Each shows the date and denomination along with the Beistle attribution, the common name of the variety, if any, and a word or two about characteristics of the die pair. Thin black tape was used to seal the edges and provide a narrow frame for the holder. Cox purchased this coin from B. Max Mehl January 2, 1958. A page from his ledger shows the cost, $50 plus $4.75 for the Art Craft holder. Cox graded the coin “XF.” On the holder he notes that this is Beistle’s variety 12-J, the Large Stars 1807, and that it may be identified by “Small lumps die defect below ‘7.’” The coin is beautiful though lightly wiped. After nearly 60 years in cardboard the obverse has acquired otherworldly hues of iridescent cobalt, blue and russet. The reverse is more lightly toned, featuring subtle shades of auburn and a half-moon of iridescence through the right-side periphery. Luster dances across both sides, suggesting a grade of XF 45 in today’s parlance. When offering the Cox Collection in April 1962 Stack’s provided a terse, uninspiring description of lot 1777: 1807 B.12J. Large Stars. Extremely Fine. Quite scarce. It sold for $45. I have encountered but two examples of Cox’ half-dollars still encased in their original Art Craft holders.

1807 50C Large Stars AU53 PCGS #6088

O.114, R3. 1807 is the birth year of the capped bust half, though it shared the year with the last of the draped busts. Officially 750k were minted but most believe the true number to be less than half that (all that from just four die marriages?). Strike is usually soft due to the inherent weaknesses of the design. But these weaknesses (dentils, LIBERTY, stars, clasp, scroll, etc.) are very inconsistent. Which makes accurate grading a real challenge. This variety is sometimes called the real large stars, not the more common O.112 that PCGS also calls large stars but is properly known as 50/20 variety.

1807 50C Large Stars AU53 PCGS #6088

O.114, R3. 1807 is the birth year of the capped bust half, though it shared the year with the last of the draped busts. Officially 750k were minted but most believe the true number to be less than half that (all that from just four die marriages?). Strike is usually soft due to the inherent weaknesses of the design. But these weaknesses (dentils, LIBERTY, stars, clasp, scroll, etc.) are very inconsistent. Which makes accurate grading a real challenge. This variety is sometimes called the real large stars, not the more common O.112 that PCGS also calls large stars but is properly known as 50/20 variety.

1807 50C Small Stars AU53 PCGS #6087

O.113a, R2. Proof-like surfaces. LDS. This first-year capped bust is the small stars variety, the only such die marriage. It has the distinctive numeral one with its missing left base and the requisite peripheral die cracks, heads and tails, which identify its die state. This colorful example has colorful envelope toning. It is well struck with nicely impressed stars, full dentils, and crisp lettering.

1807 50C Small Stars AU53 PCGS #6087

O.113a, R2. Proof-like surfaces. LDS. This first-year capped bust is the small stars variety, the only such die marriage. It has the distinctive numeral one with its missing left base and the requisite peripheral die cracks, heads and tails, which identify its die state. This colorful example has colorful envelope toning. It is well struck with nicely impressed stars, full dentils, and crisp lettering.

1807 50C Large Stars 50/20 AU58 PCGS #6086

O.112, R1. CAC. The misnamed 50/20 variety...the 2 underneath the 5 in the denomination is really just an upside down 5! The example has lovely album toning with blue and gold rims and orange and grey centers. Nicely struck with pleasant surfaces and no distractions.

1807 50C Large Stars 50/20 AU58 PCGS #6086

O.112, R1. CAC. The misnamed 50/20 variety...the 2 underneath the 5 in the denomination is really just an upside down 5! The example has lovely album toning with blue and gold rims and orange and grey centers. Nicely struck with pleasant surfaces and no distractions.

1807 50C Large Stars 50/20 AU58 PCGS #6086

O.112, R1. CAC. The misnamed 50/20 variety...the 2 underneath the 5 in the denomination is really just an upside down 5! The example has lovely album toning with blue and gold rims and orange and grey centers. Nicely struck with pleasant surfaces and no distractions.

1808 50C F12 PCGS #6090

O.110, R5'. CAC. EDS. Fine die crack end of bust to S1-3. Other known die cracks missing or extremely faint.

1808 50C F12 PCGS #6090

O.110, R5'. CAC. EDS. Fine die crack end of bust to S1-3. Other known die cracks missing or extremely faint.

1808 1C VF25BN PCGS #1543

S-279, most easily identified by the leaf tip under the center of the S on the Reverse C. Cracked for Dansco

1808 1C VF25BN PCGS #1543

S-279, most easily identified by the leaf tip under the center of the S on the Reverse C. Cracked for Dansco

1808 50C VF35 PCGS #39377

O.110a, R4+

1808 50C VF35 PCGS #39377

O.110a, R4+

1808 50C XF45 PCGS #39371

O.107a, R2. NGC cert 3412378-013. Looks AU50.

1808 50C XF45 PCGS #39371

O.107a, R2. NGC cert 3412378-013. Looks AU50.

1808 50C AU53 PCGS #6090

O.104, R2. CAC.

1808 50C AU53 PCGS #6090

O.104, R2. CAC.

1808 50C AU55 PCGS #6090

O.108, R.3. Earlier die state without die crack at upper reverse. Strong luster remains on each side. Gold and pink-violet border toning yields to silver at the centers. From the Allgood collection.

1808 50C AU55 PCGS #6090

O.108, R.3. Earlier die state without die crack at upper reverse. Strong luster remains on each side. Gold and pink-violet border toning yields to silver at the centers. From the Allgood collection.

1808 50C AU58 PCGS #39375

O.109a, R3.

1808 50C AU58 PCGS #39375

O.109a, R3.

1808 50C AU58 PCGS #6090

O.102a, R1. CAC. 1808 was the second year for Capped Bust Half dollars using design type #1 from the original hubs. As such pieces from 1808 share the same design as 1807 halves but also striking traits...typically weak in areas, and die deterioration...cracks and die failure due to both design (device location) and steel quality and hardening difficulties. With almost 1.4 million minted and many survivors of this early type, the 1808 is not rare. Higher grade survivors become scare at the AU level and higher. Ten die marriages are known with the O.110 being the most difficult to acquire (R4 ). The 1808/7 overdate is ever-popular as the first overdate of the CBH series. This example displays spectacular deep, colorful toning, lots of original mint luster and minimal strike weakness. Acquired in May 2014 from Eye Appealing Coins.

1808 50C AU58 PCGS #6090

O.102a, R1. CAC. 1808 was the second year for Capped Bust Half dollars using design type #1 from the original hubs. As such pieces from 1808 share the same design as 1807 halves but also striking traits...typically weak in areas, and die deterioration...cracks and die failure due to both design (device location) and steel quality and hardening difficulties. With almost 1.4 million minted and many survivors of this early type, the 1808 is not rare. Higher grade survivors become scare at the AU level and higher. Ten die marriages are known with the O.110 being the most difficult to acquire (R4 ). The 1808/7 overdate is ever-popular as the first overdate of the CBH series. This example displays spectacular deep, colorful toning, lots of original mint luster and minimal strike weakness. Acquired in May 2014 from Eye Appealing Coins.

1808 50C MS61 PCGS #6090

O.103, R1

1808 50C MS61 PCGS #6090

O.103, R1

1808/7 50C AU58 PCGS #6091

O.101, R1. CAC. Ex-Davignon. Hammered! NTS: 58+? Sheridan Downey's catalog description: Ex Gerald Schertz. The surfaces, while virtually free of contact marks, feature a wonderful morass of die breaks and clash marks. Only a peacock might aspire to the range of iridescent colors that grab and hold the viewer’s eye. Keith purchased the coin from me in June 1994; it was part of the nearly complete die variety set of Dr. Gerald Schertz, BHNC #45.

1808/7 50C AU58 PCGS #6091

O.101, R1. CAC. Ex-Davignon. Hammered! NTS: 58+? Sheridan Downey's catalog description: Ex Gerald Schertz. The surfaces, while virtually free of contact marks, feature a wonderful morass of die breaks and clash marks. Only a peacock might aspire to the range of iridescent colors that grab and hold the viewer’s eye. Keith purchased the coin from me in June 1994; it was part of the nearly complete die variety set of Dr. Gerald Schertz, BHNC #45.

1808/7 50C AU58 PCGS #6091

O.101, R1. CAC. Ex-Davignon. Hammered! NTS: 58+? Sheridan Downey's catalog description: Ex Gerald Schertz. The surfaces, while virtually free of contact marks, feature a wonderful morass of die breaks and clash marks. Only a peacock might aspire to the range of iridescent colors that grab and hold the viewer’s eye. Keith purchased the coin from me in June 1994; it was part of the nearly complete die variety set of Dr. Gerald Schertz, BHNC #45.

1809 1C F12BN PCGS #1546

S-280, only one variety. Old ANACS #E-5323-Z. VG08 obv, F12 rev. The "Blowsy Barmaid" classic head cent.

1809 1C F12BN PCGS #1546

S-280, only one variety. Old ANACS #E-5323-Z. VG08 obv, F12 rev. The "Blowsy Barmaid" classic head cent.

1809 50C VF25 PCGS #39393

O.104, R5.

1809 50C VF25 PCGS #39393

O.104, R5.

1809 50C XXX Edge VF30 PCGS #39381

O.108a, R4. A scarce variety with intriguing characteristics. For example, note the rows of small segments embossed on the reverse, within and around AMERICA. This reverse die was used previously (O.107) and has the often-missing straight die lines radiating from the curve of eagle's neck. The obverse is from die 5, die-state 2, as shown by the break at star 4. It runs from rim through the star and ends in a lump. Central devices are quite flat, commonly. Uniquely, the O.108 is the only die marriage with a mix of XXX and III edge lettering.

1809 50C XXX Edge VF30 PCGS #39381

O.108a, R4. A scarce variety with intriguing characteristics. For example, note the rows of small segments embossed on the reverse, within and around AMERICA. This reverse die was used previously (O.107) and has the often-missing straight die lines radiating from the curve of eagle's neck. The obverse is from die 5, die-state 2, as shown by the break at star 4. It runs from rim through the star and ends in a lump. Central devices are quite flat, commonly. Uniquely, the O.108 is the only die marriage with a mix of XXX and III edge lettering.

1809 50C VF30 PCGS #39397

O.112, R5.

1809 50C VF30 PCGS #39397

O.112, R5.

1809 50C VF35 PCGS #39399

O.113a, R5+ (R6 die state).

1809 50C VF35 PCGS #39399

O.113a, R5+ (R6 die state).

1809 50C XXX Edge VF35 PCGS #39379

O.101, R5. CAC.

1809 50C XXX Edge VF35 PCGS #39379

O.101, R5. CAC.

1809 50C XF40 PCGS #39401

O.114a, R5. Raw, PL surfaces. Has hairlines from an old wipe.

1809 50C XF40 PCGS #39401

O.114a, R5. Raw, PL surfaces. Has hairlines from an old wipe.

1809 50C AU53 PCGS #6092

O.106, R3.

1809 50C AU53 PCGS #6092

O.106, R3.

1809 50C III Edge AU55 PCGS #39387

O.109a, R2. This III-edge has a prominent die crack running through AMERICA, particular to the 109a variety. It comes with strong luster and eye appealing tone. Subtle deep orange and blue obverse hues are enhanced on the reverse. Obverse rim devices are nicely bold, with some weakness in Liberty's locks and clasp, a result of changes to the turban head design in 1809. Efforts to improve bust detail, however, were met with metal flow problems. As a result hair is generally poorly detailed and too, Eagle's left wing.

1809 50C III Edge AU55 PCGS #39387

O.109a, R2. This III-edge has a prominent die crack running through AMERICA, particular to the 109a variety. It comes with strong luster and eye appealing tone. Subtle deep orange and blue obverse hues are enhanced on the reverse. Obverse rim devices are nicely bold, with some weakness in Liberty's locks and clasp, a result of changes to the turban head design in 1809. Efforts to improve bust detail, however, were met with metal flow problems. As a result hair is generally poorly detailed and too, Eagle's left wing.

1809 50C XXX Edge AU58 PCGS #6093

O.102a, R1. This variety is notable, and was collected for its different edge lettering. For reasons we can only guess, four of 1809's 15 varieties have XXX characters stamped into the edge. Four other varieties used III inscriptions. (One variety, the O.108 shows both.) A good guess is that this was done to repair flawed die bars but no one really knows. According to Ivan Leaman and Donald Gunnet's 1986 report, Edges and Die Sequences on Early Half Dollars, "Three of the 1809 edges bear ornamentation and are called the "experimental edges". The third edge exhibits heavy vertical grooves at the beginning of each bar in front of FIFTY and HALF. The fourth edge is called the "engrailed" edge. There is a series of X-like figures at the front of the first bar and at the end of the second. The sixth edge contains only 106. There are light grooves in the front of HALF. We call this the "pseudo-engrailed" edge."

1809 50C XXX Edge AU58 PCGS #6093

O.102a, R1. This variety is notable, and was collected for its different edge lettering. For reasons we can only guess, four of 1809's 15 varieties have XXX characters stamped into the edge. Four other varieties used III inscriptions. (One variety, the O.108 shows both.) A good guess is that this was done to repair flawed die bars but no one really knows. According to Ivan Leaman and Donald Gunnet's 1986 report, Edges and Die Sequences on Early Half Dollars, "Three of the 1809 edges bear ornamentation and are called the "experimental edges". The third edge exhibits heavy vertical grooves at the beginning of each bar in front of FIFTY and HALF. The fourth edge is called the "engrailed" edge. There is a series of X-like figures at the front of the first bar and at the end of the second. The sixth edge contains only 106. There are light grooves in the front of HALF. We call this the "pseudo-engrailed" edge."

1809 50C AU58 PCGS #6092

O.105, R1. CAC. ex-David Kahn. Catalog description: Fully struck obverse. All 13 stars display center points. The reverse is comparable, with slight weakness at top of left wing. Cartwheel luster rolls beneath the medium grey antique toning. Here is a lovely 1809 for a top flight collection!

1809 50C AU58 PCGS #6092

O.105, R1. CAC. ex-David Kahn. Catalog description: Fully struck obverse. All 13 stars display center points. The reverse is comparable, with slight weakness at top of left wing. Cartwheel luster rolls beneath the medium grey antique toning. Here is a lovely 1809 for a top flight collection!

1809 50C III Edge AU58 PCGS #39389

O.111a, R2. Ex-Tom Sears, bought Feb 2017 HA $4700.

1809 50C III Edge AU58 PCGS #39389

O.111a, R2. Ex-Tom Sears, bought Feb 2017 HA $4700.

1809 50C AU58 PCGS #6092

O.103. CAC. Ex-Tom Sears

1809 50C AU58 PCGS #6092

O.103. CAC. Ex-Tom Sears

1809 50C III Edge AU58+ PCGS #6094

O.107a, R3. CAC.

1809 50C III Edge AU58+ PCGS #6094

O.107a, R3. CAC.

181.7 50C Punctuated Date AU55 PCGS #6110

O.103. R2. Besides the overdates there are two notable varieties. The single leaf O.106a (a result of lapping) and the punctuated date O.103 (likely from a dropped object on a softened die).

181.7 50C Punctuated Date AU55 PCGS #6110

O.103. R2. Besides the overdates there are two notable varieties. The single leaf O.106a (a result of lapping) and the punctuated date O.103 (likely from a dropped object on a softened die).

181.7 50C Punctuated Date AU55 PCGS #6110

O.103. R2. Besides the overdates there are two notable varieties. The single leaf O.106a (a result of lapping) and the punctuated date O.103 (likely from a dropped object on a softened die).

1810 1C VG10BN PCGS #1549

S-282. Was ICG VG10 cert# 6951795401. Cracked out for Dansco.

1810 1C VG10BN PCGS #1549

S-282. Was ICG VG10 cert# 6951795401. Cracked out for Dansco.

1810 50C AU50 PCGS #6095

O.105, R2

1810 50C AU50 PCGS #6095

O.105, R2

1810 50C AU53 PCGS #6095

O.102a, R1.

1810 50C AU53 PCGS #6095

O.102a, R1.

1810 50C AU55 PCGS #39408

O.103, R2

1810 50C AU55 PCGS #39408

O.103, R2

1810 50C AU55 PCGS #6095

O.110, R2. Was old, small ANACS cert# 1406304

1810 50C AU55 PCGS #6095

O.110, R2. Was old, small ANACS cert# 1406304

1810 50C AU58 PCGS #6095

O.101a, R1. Ex-Keith Davignon. NTS: 58+?

1810 50C AU58 PCGS #6095

O.101a, R1. Ex-Keith Davignon. NTS: 58+?

1810 50C AU58 PCGS #6095

O.106, R3. Flashy yellow/white, from a dip no doubt, but a proper one that did not impair luster on the frosty surfaces. The unclashed obverse has crisp details and an early die state, while the well impressed reverse shows some signs of clashing. The coin was struck off-center (note the reeding at 6 and 12 o'clock, both sides). Was NGC cert# 3474530-001.

1810 50C AU58 PCGS #6095

O.106, R3. Flashy yellow/white, from a dip no doubt, but a proper one that did not impair luster on the frosty surfaces. The unclashed obverse has crisp details and an early die state, while the well impressed reverse shows some signs of clashing. The coin was struck off-center (note the reeding at 6 and 12 o'clock, both sides). Was NGC cert# 3474530-001.

1811 1C F12BN PCGS #1555

S-287 (not the overdate so only one variety).

1811 1C F12BN PCGS #1555

S-287 (not the overdate so only one variety).

1811 50C Small 8 AU50 PCGS #39440

O.113, R5. Catalog description: Have you noticed how many R.5 capped bust halfdollars are just plain ugly? The explanation is that most were struck in small numbers from dies that were well past their prime or harbored fatal structural defects. Soft, uneven strikes are the norm for this coveted group. The 1811 O.113 is a good example. The central devices are invariably mushy because the dies themselves lacked detail. Stars and letters are indistinct and drawn to the edge. Might there be a saving grace – aside from the lure of rarity? Indeed. Eye appeal also derives from toning. In this offering we have a beguiling mix of natural rose, blue, turquoise and gold. Soft luster permeates the patina. The result is that rare animal - an R.5 that is both high grade and nice looking. Consult your AMBPR and Dave Rutherford’s Internet Price Guide before bidding. And expect competition!

1811 50C Small 8 AU50 PCGS #39440

O.113, R5. Catalog description: Have you noticed how many R.5 capped bust halfdollars are just plain ugly? The explanation is that most were struck in small numbers from dies that were well past their prime or harbored fatal structural defects. Soft, uneven strikes are the norm for this coveted group. The 1811 O.113 is a good example. The central devices are invariably mushy because the dies themselves lacked detail. Stars and letters are indistinct and drawn to the edge. Might there be a saving grace – aside from the lure of rarity? Indeed. Eye appeal also derives from toning. In this offering we have a beguiling mix of natural rose, blue, turquoise and gold. Soft luster permeates the patina. The result is that rare animal - an R.5 that is both high grade and nice looking. Consult your AMBPR and Dave Rutherford’s Internet Price Guide before bidding. And expect competition!

1811 50C Small 8 AU50 PCGS #39438

O.112a, R5. NGC Cert# 308137-013

1811 50C Small 8 AU50 PCGS #39438

O.112a, R5. NGC Cert# 308137-013

1811 50C Small 8 AU55 PCGS #6097

O.109, R2. Ex-Hartl. Catalog description: Yes, another 1811 blessed with rings of album toning. Sharply struck obverse, the reverse with typical weakness at the left wing. Strong luster seems unimpaired by a gentle wiping. Exceptionally smooth surfaces, save for an area under the right side of the motto. A pretty coin!

1811 50C Small 8 AU55 PCGS #6097

O.109, R2. Ex-Hartl. Catalog description: Yes, another 1811 blessed with rings of album toning. Sharply struck obverse, the reverse with typical weakness at the left wing. Strong luster seems unimpaired by a gentle wiping. Exceptionally smooth surfaces, save for an area under the right side of the motto. A pretty coin!

1811 50C Small 8 AU55 PCGS #39429

O.106 R3. Here is a nice example of a fairly scarce variety. Most 1811's have compromised relief due to die wear and, perhaps, hard planchets. This examples shows weak/incomplete milling and stars drawn to the edge. The reverse shows numerous indications of die fatigue with die cracks and signs of die maintenance. This CBH has a pretty patina with light gold and brown, rimmed by touches of orange and blue. A very original look with pleasing strong luster.

1811 50C Small 8 AU55 PCGS #39429

O.106 R3. Here is a nice example of a fairly scarce variety. Most 1811's have compromised relief due to die wear and, perhaps, hard planchets. This examples shows weak/incomplete milling and stars drawn to the edge. The reverse shows numerous indications of die fatigue with die cracks and signs of die maintenance. This CBH has a pretty patina with light gold and brown, rimmed by touches of orange and blue. A very original look with pleasing strong luster.

1811 50C Large 8 AU58 PCGS #39424

O.103a, R4. Exotic is a great way to describe the look and appeal of this somewhat scarce die marriage. Intense, deep chocolate brown dominates the obverse, blending into sea green rims. Mauve paints the reverse yielding to more blue/green. Nice luster flashes underneath all this, spewing splashy iridescence as the coin is rotated in hand. Clashing enthusiasts will love the crisp impression of eagle on the obverse with the rare appearance of leaves and berries at Liberty's forehead and arrowheads atop her cap. Signs of die erosion and fatigue are obvious on each side with significant die cracks at 1811 and 50 C. In spite of the LDS a good strike produces full details (curls, clasp, banner, feathers) with only a touch of weakness at TA and the upper left wing. ex-Pittman, lot 1459

1811 50C Large 8 AU58 PCGS #39424

O.103a, R4. Exotic is a great way to describe the look and appeal of this somewhat scarce die marriage. Intense, deep chocolate brown dominates the obverse, blending into sea green rims. Mauve paints the reverse yielding to more blue/green. Nice luster flashes underneath all this, spewing splashy iridescence as the coin is rotated in hand. Clashing enthusiasts will love the crisp impression of eagle on the obverse with the rare appearance of leaves and berries at Liberty's forehead and arrowheads atop her cap. Signs of die erosion and fatigue are obvious on each side with significant die cracks at 1811 and 50 C. In spite of the LDS a good strike produces full details (curls, clasp, banner, feathers) with only a touch of weakness at TA and the upper left wing. ex-Pittman, lot 1459

1811 50C Small 8 AU58 PCGS #6097

O.108a, R2. Struck off center, clashed, and with interesting sea green, gold, blue, and pink colors. Little to no milling is common for this marriage. Lot# 0869

1811 50C Small 8 AU58 PCGS #6097

O.108a, R2. Struck off center, clashed, and with interesting sea green, gold, blue, and pink colors. Little to no milling is common for this marriage. Lot# 0869

1811 50C Large 8 AU58+ PCGS #6096

O.104a, R1. Cataloger's description: A thin ring of iridescent toning outlines the dentils. The untoned centers are alive with cartwheel luster. Here is a coin that never saw circulation. Minuscule signs of handling befit the 58 designation. Well struck and ready for a home in a first class die variety or Red Book set.

1811 50C Large 8 AU58+ PCGS #6096

O.104a, R1. Cataloger's description: A thin ring of iridescent toning outlines the dentils. The untoned centers are alive with cartwheel luster. Here is a coin that never saw circulation. Minuscule signs of handling befit the 58 designation. Well struck and ready for a home in a first class die variety or Red Book set.

1811 50C Small 8 MS62 PCGS #39428

O.105a, R2. A personal favorite with off-the-charts eye appeal. Wonderful album toning, rich with sparkling yellow-white centers and radiant blues and oranges at the rims with touches of lavender. Full, rolling luster highlights a terrific strike and intense reverse die cracks from a collapsing die. Formerly AU58, ex-Davignon.

1811 50C Small 8 MS62 PCGS #39428

O.105a, R2. A personal favorite with off-the-charts eye appeal. Wonderful album toning, rich with sparkling yellow-white centers and radiant blues and oranges at the rims with touches of lavender. Full, rolling luster highlights a terrific strike and intense reverse die cracks from a collapsing die. Formerly AU58, ex-Davignon.

1811 50C Small 8 MS62 PCGS #6097

O.110a, R1.

1811 50C Small 8 MS62 PCGS #6097

O.110a, R1.

1811/10 50C AU55 PCGS #39422

O.102, R4. Ex-Tom Sears.

1811/10 50C AU55 PCGS #39422

O.102, R4. Ex-Tom Sears.

1811/10 50C AU55 PCGS #6099

O.101, R1. This overdate, often called the punctuated date is from one of two die marriages (O.102 is the other). Look closely and you can see much of the 0 under the 3rd 1. There is a bold die dot between 8 and 1. And depending on who you believe the fragment between the two 1's is either from another nick in the die or it is what is left over from the earlier 1. In general the strike is just fine on these overdates but the relief is usually not as good as the yeardates due to lapping. Stars are always weak on the left obverse of the O.101 and, oddly, just the opposite on the O.102., same die. How can that be? Only a remarriage explains it (but you have to wonder why remarriages ever happen).

1811/10 50C AU55 PCGS #6099

O.101, R1. This overdate, often called the punctuated date is from one of two die marriages (O.102 is the other). Look closely and you can see much of the 0 under the 3rd 1. There is a bold die dot between 8 and 1. And depending on who you believe the fragment between the two 1's is either from another nick in the die or it is what is left over from the earlier 1. In general the strike is just fine on these overdates but the relief is usually not as good as the yeardates due to lapping. Stars are always weak on the left obverse of the O.101 and, oddly, just the opposite on the O.102., same die. How can that be? Only a remarriage explains it (but you have to wonder why remarriages ever happen).

1812 1C Large Date VG8BN PCGS #36508

S-289. Medium to dark brown in color. A few very light obverse rim bumps but overall very nice for the grade. Net VG7.

1812 1C Large Date VG8BN PCGS #36508

S-289. Medium to dark brown in color. A few very light obverse rim bumps but overall very nice for the grade. Net VG7.

1812 50C XF45 PCGS #39451

O.106, R3

1812 50C XF45 PCGS #39451

O.106, R3

1812 50C AU53 PCGS #6100

O.107, R1. (BHNC R6? No trace of die lump above left wing.) Most 1812 yeardate halves are very well struck. And yet we still see weakness in the central areas. Chief Engraver Reich prepared a new MD for 1812. It is believed this was done in hopes of improving how the halves struck up. Deeper recesses and thicker curls did not improve detail, however. Just the opposite. Metal flow issues continued to plague the high points. This AU53 is an early die state with no die lump or clashing, full denticles, stars, motto and banner. Just a touch of die erosion. It is richly toned with a pleasant skin of pale brown, and rim accents in red, orange and blue. Luster is strong, though not superb, but the combination of skin, color, luster and strike give it a very eye appealing look.

1812 50C AU53 PCGS #6100

O.107, R1. (BHNC R6? No trace of die lump above left wing.) Most 1812 yeardate halves are very well struck. And yet we still see weakness in the central areas. Chief Engraver Reich prepared a new MD for 1812. It is believed this was done in hopes of improving how the halves struck up. Deeper recesses and thicker curls did not improve detail, however. Just the opposite. Metal flow issues continued to plague the high points. This AU53 is an early die state with no die lump or clashing, full denticles, stars, motto and banner. Just a touch of die erosion. It is richly toned with a pleasant skin of pale brown, and rim accents in red, orange and blue. Luster is strong, though not superb, but the combination of skin, color, luster and strike give it a very eye appealing look.

1812 50C AU55 PCGS #6100

O.103, R1. A very early die state with exceptional detail and rims. Full luster in spite of the obvious dip. Was NGC AU58 cert# 571861-019

1812 50C AU55 PCGS #6100

O.103, R1. A very early die state with exceptional detail and rims. Full luster in spite of the obvious dip. Was NGC AU58 cert# 571861-019

1812 50C AU55 PCGS #6100

O.105a, R1. CAC

1812 50C AU55 PCGS #6100

O.105a, R1. CAC

1812 50C AU58 PCGS #6100

O.110, R1. CAC. Ex-Davignon. Catalog description: A halo of pale gold envelops the stars and legend. The centers are antique grey with subtle rose and copper highlights. Another first-rate 1812. Acquired at the Jan. 2012 FUN Show from David Lawrence RC.

1812 50C AU58 PCGS #6100

O.110, R1. CAC. Ex-Davignon. Catalog description: A halo of pale gold envelops the stars and legend. The centers are antique grey with subtle rose and copper highlights. Another first-rate 1812. Acquired at the Jan. 2012 FUN Show from David Lawrence RC.

1812 50C AU58+ PCGS #6100

O.104, R1. ex-CAC. Reverse rotated 60º.

1812 50C AU58+ PCGS #6100

O.104, R1. ex-CAC. Reverse rotated 60º.

1812 50C MS62 PCGS #39455

O.109, R2. Ex-chuck Link

1812 50C MS62 PCGS #39455

O.109, R2. Ex-chuck Link

1812/1 50C Large 8 XF40 PCGS #6102

O.101, R5. Lovely original, problem-free specimen attractively toned from album storage. Looks like a technical VF35 given a bump for its eye appeal.

1812/1 50C Large 8 XF40 PCGS #6102

O.101, R5. Lovely original, problem-free specimen attractively toned from album storage. Looks like a technical VF35 given a bump for its eye appeal.

1812/1 50C Large 8 XF40 PCGS #6102

O.101, R5. Lovely original, problem-free specimen attractively toned from album storage. Looks like a technical VF35 given a bump for its eye appeal.

1812/1 50C Small 8 AU55 PCGS #6101

O.102, R2. CAC. The 1812 overdates are not as well struck as the yeardates which were the product of a different MD. Adding to the problem is the fact that most overdates received quite a bit of die lapping to remove or minimize traces of the underdate. The over all impression leaves one to conclude that these coins appear more worn than they likely are. This extremely lustrous, colorful small-8 overdate has a slightly better than average strike (obverse) paired with a very nice EDS reverse. The thick skin adds a feeling of originality.

1812/1 50C Small 8 AU55 PCGS #6101

O.102, R2. CAC. The 1812 overdates are not as well struck as the yeardates which were the product of a different MD. Adding to the problem is the fact that most overdates received quite a bit of die lapping to remove or minimize traces of the underdate. The over all impression leaves one to conclude that these coins appear more worn than they likely are. This extremely lustrous, colorful small-8 overdate has a slightly better than average strike (obverse) paired with a very nice EDS reverse. The thick skin adds a feeling of originality.

1812/1 50C Small 8 AU55 PCGS #6101

O.102, R2. CAC. The 1812 overdates are not as well struck as the yeardates which were the product of a different MD. Adding to the problem is the fact that most overdates received quite a bit of die lapping to remove or minimize traces of the underdate. The over all impression leaves one to conclude that these coins appear more worn than they likely are. This extremely lustrous, colorful small-8 overdate has a slightly better than average strike (obverse) paired with a very nice EDS reverse. The thick skin adds a feeling of originality.

1813 1C VF20BN PCGS #1570

S-293.

1813 1C VF20BN PCGS #1570

S-293.

1813 50C AU50 PCGS #6103

O.107a, R1. Attractive album toning with unusually strong luster. This variety is known for its shattered dies and clash marks, and this example is very late state with spectacularly shattered dies. NTS: regrade

1813 50C AU50 PCGS #6103

O.107a, R1. Attractive album toning with unusually strong luster. This variety is known for its shattered dies and clash marks, and this example is very late state with spectacularly shattered dies. NTS: regrade

1813 50C AU50 PCGS #6103

O.110, R1. Triple clashed LDS obverse as evidenced by the die crack from rim, left of date, up into bust. The reverse is well struck, as is normal, and was later paired with a new obverse in the O.109.

1813 50C AU50 PCGS #6103

O.110, R1. Triple clashed LDS obverse as evidenced by the die crack from rim, left of date, up into bust. The reverse is well struck, as is normal, and was later paired with a new obverse in the O.109.

1813 50C AU50 PCGS #6103

O.110, R1. Triple clashed LDS obverse as evidenced by the die crack from rim, left of date, up into bust. The reverse is well struck, as is normal, and was later paired with a new obverse in the O.109.

1813 50C AU53 PCGS #39460

O.102, R4.

1813 50C AU53 PCGS #39460

O.102, R4.

1813 50C AU53 PCGS #39460

O.102, R4.

1813 50C AU58 PCGS #6103

O.105, R1. Catalog description: Ex Keith Davignon. Deep turquoise toning with enticing rose and gold highlights. The surfaces present the usual assortment of clash marks but are otherwise smooth. Keith found this beautiful 1813 at Don Ketterling’s table during the 2015 ANA Convention.

1813 50C AU58 PCGS #6103

O.105, R1. Catalog description: Ex Keith Davignon. Deep turquoise toning with enticing rose and gold highlights. The surfaces present the usual assortment of clash marks but are otherwise smooth. Keith found this beautiful 1813 at Don Ketterling’s table during the 2015 ANA Convention.

1813 50C 50C/UNI AU58+ PCGS #6104

O.101, R2. CAC. A popular variety, the 50C/UNI gets its name from the obviously botched lower reverse. In one of the most spectacular errors, the engraver (Reich) lost his point of reference and punched UNI at the 5 o'clock position (instead of 8:30) before realizing his blunder. Scraping, and later lapping, was done but traces remained as this example shows.

1813 50C 50C/UNI AU58+ PCGS #6104

O.101, R2. CAC. A popular variety, the 50C/UNI gets its name from the obviously botched lower reverse. In one of the most spectacular errors, the engraver (Reich) lost his point of reference and punched UNI at the 5 o'clock position (instead of 8:30) before realizing his blunder. Scraping, and later lapping, was done but traces remained as this example shows.

1813 50C 50C/UNI AU58+ PCGS #6104

O.101, R2. CAC. A popular variety, the 50C/UNI gets its name from the obviously botched lower reverse. In one of the most spectacular errors, the engraver (Reich) lost his point of reference and punched UNI at the 5 o'clock position (instead of 8:30) before realizing his blunder. Scraping, and later lapping, was done but traces remained as this example shows.

1813 50C AU58+ PCGS #6103

O.108a R2. CAC. Ten marriages for 1813, more than 1.2 million minted, most with weak-to-good strike. This version is a favorite. Formerly owned by Prouty (as a MS62), and more recently by the late Roger Solomon. It is simply superb: a sharply impressed EDS obverse is paired with a well used but nicely struck reverse. The die pair produced halves with very weak milling...often incomplete. Overton states "Many specimens show rim damage in minting, especially on the reverse and adjacent to AMERICA." The 108a die state is more common than the 108 R4. Obverse die cracks and incomplete reverse milling characterize it. Color is attractive silver and gold with a bit of burnt orange. Surfaces are all but mark free, save some Mint clashing. The luster is remarkably full and strong. Only the very slightest rub can be seen at upper left wing.

1813 50C AU58+ PCGS #6103

O.108a R2. CAC. Ten marriages for 1813, more than 1.2 million minted, most with weak-to-good strike. This version is a favorite. Formerly owned by Prouty (as a MS62), and more recently by the late Roger Solomon. It is simply superb: a sharply impressed EDS obverse is paired with a well used but nicely struck reverse. The die pair produced halves with very weak milling...often incomplete. Overton states "Many specimens show rim damage in minting, especially on the reverse and adjacent to AMERICA." The 108a die state is more common than the 108 R4. Obverse die cracks and incomplete reverse milling characterize it. Color is attractive silver and gold with a bit of burnt orange. Surfaces are all but mark free, save some Mint clashing. The luster is remarkably full and strong. Only the very slightest rub can be seen at upper left wing.

1813 50C MS62 PCGS #39471

O.109, R3. LDS and probably equivalent to O.109a R5, the so-called single leaf. Through either excessive die wear or die lapping, as evidenced here, the 2nd leaf has been lost. On high grade specimens like this a trace of the 2nd leaf often shows.

1813 50C MS62 PCGS #39471

O.109, R3. LDS and probably equivalent to O.109a R5, the so-called single leaf. Through either excessive die wear or die lapping, as evidenced here, the 2nd leaf has been lost. On high grade specimens like this a trace of the 2nd leaf often shows.

1813 50C MS62 PCGS #39471

O.109, R3. LDS and probably equivalent to O.109a R5, the so-called single leaf. Through either excessive die wear or die lapping, as evidenced here, the 2nd leaf has been lost. On high grade specimens like this a trace of the 2nd leaf often shows.

1813 50C MS62 PCGS #6103

O.103, R2.

1813 50C MS62 PCGS #6103

O.103, R2.

1814 1C Crosslet 4 VF20BN PCGS #1573

Cracked for Dansco

1814 1C Crosslet 4 VF20BN PCGS #1573

Cracked for Dansco

1814 50C VF25 PCGS #39482

O.106a, R4+. VLDS. Cleaned improperly.

1814 50C VF25 PCGS #39482

O.106a, R4+. VLDS. Cleaned improperly.

1814 50C XF45 PCGS #39481

O.105a, R4. ex-CAC (cert# 26403850). The single-leaf variety is the result of die maintenance. The die pair had become excessively clashed so it was lapped...excessively so on the reverse. Detail suffered, particularly to eagle's lower feathers and to fig leaves. One leaf was lost (leaving a single leaf instead of a pair) along with a fig stem (leaving a floating berry). This example has a dirty, original look with strong features in spite of the obviously eroded die pair.

1814 50C XF45 PCGS #39481

O.105a, R4. ex-CAC (cert# 26403850). The single-leaf variety is the result of die maintenance. The die pair had become excessively clashed so it was lapped...excessively so on the reverse. Detail suffered, particularly to eagle's lower feathers and to fig leaves. One leaf was lost (leaving a single leaf instead of a pair) along with a fig stem (leaving a floating berry). This example has a dirty, original look with strong features in spite of the obviously eroded die pair.

1814 50C XF45 PCGS #6105

O.106, R4+ (R5 in this die state). CAC

1814 50C XF45 PCGS #6105

O.106, R4+ (R5 in this die state). CAC

1814 50C AU55 PCGS #6105

O.109 R2 (O.109'). Early die state, free of clashing, very unusual for this date. It has clean, proof-like fields and is mostly untoned except around the rims. Probably dipped long ago and placed back in a folder. Was NGC AU58 cert# 1806961-010.

1814 50C AU55 PCGS #6105

O.109 R2 (O.109'). Early die state, free of clashing, very unusual for this date. It has clean, proof-like fields and is mostly untoned except around the rims. Probably dipped long ago and placed back in a folder. Was NGC AU58 cert# 1806961-010.

1814 50C E/A AU55 PCGS #6107

O.108a, R1. Nine die marriages were produced from a mintage of just over 1 million, the fourth lowest of the series. Among these nine marriages were the 1814/3 overdate, the very scarce single leaf and the major variety E over A. Here is the interesting E over A. Speculation is that the A punched into STATES instead of the correct E was not a matter of illiteracy by the help or a spelling error by Reich. It was likely due to a distraction that caused Reich to lose his place. Seeing a T and little more (under magnification) he didn't realize he was about to strike the fifth letter, not the third. I wonder what expletive he uttered. This die marriage is heavily clashed and LDS's are very eroded. Typical soft spots include the eagle's left wing and head. This better struck example has a pleasant rose, orange, and pale blue hue, not as intense as the True View picture. ex-Eastern Woods II.

1814 50C E/A AU55 PCGS #6107

O.108a, R1. Nine die marriages were produced from a mintage of just over 1 million, the fourth lowest of the series. Among these nine marriages were the 1814/3 overdate, the very scarce single leaf and the major variety E over A. Here is the interesting E over A. Speculation is that the A punched into STATES instead of the correct E was not a matter of illiteracy by the help or a spelling error by Reich. It was likely due to a distraction that caused Reich to lose his place. Seeing a T and little more (under magnification) he didn't realize he was about to strike the fifth letter, not the third. I wonder what expletive he uttered. This die marriage is heavily clashed and LDS's are very eroded. Typical soft spots include the eagle's left wing and head. This better struck example has a pleasant rose, orange, and pale blue hue, not as intense as the True View picture. ex-Eastern Woods II.

1814 50C E/A AU55 PCGS #6107

O.108a, R1. Nine die marriages were produced from a mintage of just over 1 million, the fourth lowest of the series. Among these nine marriages were the 1814/3 overdate, the very scarce single leaf and the major variety E over A. Here is the interesting E over A. Speculation is that the A punched into STATES instead of the correct E was not a matter of illiteracy by the help or a spelling error by Reich. It was likely due to a distraction that caused Reich to lose his place. Seeing a T and little more (under magnification) he didn't realize he was about to strike the fifth letter, not the third. I wonder what expletive he uttered. This die marriage is heavily clashed and LDS's are very eroded. Typical soft spots include the eagle's left wing and head. This better struck example has a pleasant rose, orange, and pale blue hue, not as intense as the True View picture. ex-Eastern Woods II.

1814 50C E/A AU55 PCGS #6107

O.108a, R1. Nine die marriages were produced from a mintage of just over 1 million, the fourth lowest of the series. Among these nine marriages were the 1814/3 overdate, the very scarce single leaf and the major variety E over A. Here is the interesting E over A. Speculation is that the A punched into STATES instead of the correct E was not a matter of illiteracy by the help or a spelling error by Reich. It was likely due to a distraction that caused Reich to lose his place. Seeing a T and little more (under magnification) he didn't realize he was about to strike the fifth letter, not the third. I wonder what expletive he uttered. This die marriage is heavily clashed and LDS's are very eroded. Typical soft spots include the eagle's left wing and head. This better struck example has a pleasant rose, orange, and pale blue hue, not as intense as the True View picture. ex-Eastern Woods II.

1814 50C AU55 PCGS #6105

O.107, R2. Heavily clashed like so many 1814's, this CBH has superior luster and a pretty, lightly toned look with subtle gold, russet, and turquoise colors. Very conservatively graded. Star 13 has the requisite extension on the end point near the curl . A rough die break can be seen to the left of stars 10 & 11.

1814 50C AU55 PCGS #6105

O.107, R2. Heavily clashed like so many 1814's, this CBH has superior luster and a pretty, lightly toned look with subtle gold, russet, and turquoise colors. Very conservatively graded. Star 13 has the requisite extension on the end point near the curl . A rough die break can be seen to the left of stars 10 & 11.

1814 50C AU58 PCGS #6105

O.104a, R2. 1814 is a very fun year for CBH enthusiasts. This historically important year gave us a fabulous overdate (1814/3 O.101) and a few significant varieties (the Single Leaf O.105a and the O.108 E over A) along with the scarce O.106 (R4+). This example illustrates problems the Mint was having with die failure. Note the numerous obverse and reverse die cracks. Acquired at Sept 2014 Heritage Auction in Long Beach.

1814 50C AU58 PCGS #6105

O.104a, R2. 1814 is a very fun year for CBH enthusiasts. This historically important year gave us a fabulous overdate (1814/3 O.101) and a few significant varieties (the Single Leaf O.105a and the O.108 E over A) along with the scarce O.106 (R4+). This example illustrates problems the Mint was having with die failure. Note the numerous obverse and reverse die cracks. Acquired at Sept 2014 Heritage Auction in Long Beach.

1814 50C AU58 PCGS #6105

O.102a, R3.

1814 50C AU58 PCGS #6105

O.102a, R3.

1814 50C MS62 PCGS #6105

O.103, R1

1814 50C MS62 PCGS #6105

O.103, R1

1814/3 50C AU53 PCGS #6106

O.101a. R2. One of the more popular overdates, the 1814/3 die marriage rapidly deteriorated, producing various die states. Two are fundamental: O.101 without die cracks and O.101a, with. The former is an R6 which testifies to the rapid decline of the dies. Besides the plain overdate there are other notable traits of this die pair. Two dentils north of the second T in STATES, e.g., are oversized and the left one is attached to the T with a die defect. The dies clashing no doubt contributed to their spectacular failure. This example is an early die state for the late O.101a, and is very well struck for the issue (the left wing is always weak on these). It appears original, handsomely toned and remarkably lustrous.

1814/3 50C AU53 PCGS #6106

O.101a. R2. One of the more popular overdates, the 1814/3 die marriage rapidly deteriorated, producing various die states. Two are fundamental: O.101 without die cracks and O.101a, with. The former is an R6 which testifies to the rapid decline of the dies. Besides the plain overdate there are other notable traits of this die pair. Two dentils north of the second T in STATES, e.g., are oversized and the left one is attached to the T with a die defect. The dies clashing no doubt contributed to their spectacular failure. This example is an early die state for the late O.101a, and is very well struck for the issue (the left wing is always weak on these). It appears original, handsomely toned and remarkably lustrous.

1815/2 50C AU58+ PCGS #6108

O.101, R2. CAC. From the George Hamilton collection. Originally housed in an NGC old fattie graded AU55 with a CAC gold sticker. The catalog description: It is challenging to find an 1815/2 half dollar with any degree of eye appeal. They are by and large a dull lot, and many of the surviving pieces are impaired in one way or another. The present coin is a wonderful exception. Originally toned in attractive blue, violet, and tangerine-gold toning, both sides are brightly lustrous and sharply struck. Aside from the inevitable die clashing, there are no marks of consequence. Housed in an early generation NGC holder from about 25 years ago (with hologram but without the barcode), this Choice About Uncirculated coin carries the CAC gold sticker indicating it is undergraded by at least one level. An interesting bit of trivia about the 1815/2 is that the entire lot of coins struck in early Jan 1816 were paid out a single customer: Jones, Firth and Co. How often can we trace provenance and know with certainty the original owner?

1815/2 50C AU58+ PCGS #6108

O.101, R2. CAC. From the George Hamilton collection. Originally housed in an NGC old fattie graded AU55 with a CAC gold sticker. The catalog description: It is challenging to find an 1815/2 half dollar with any degree of eye appeal. They are by and large a dull lot, and many of the surviving pieces are impaired in one way or another. The present coin is a wonderful exception. Originally toned in attractive blue, violet, and tangerine-gold toning, both sides are brightly lustrous and sharply struck. Aside from the inevitable die clashing, there are no marks of consequence. Housed in an early generation NGC holder from about 25 years ago (with hologram but without the barcode), this Choice About Uncirculated coin carries the CAC gold sticker indicating it is undergraded by at least one level. An interesting bit of trivia about the 1815/2 is that the entire lot of coins struck in early Jan 1816 were paid out a single customer: Jones, Firth and Co. How often can we trace provenance and know with certainty the original owner?

1815/2 50C AU58+ PCGS #6108

O.101, R2. CAC. From the George Hamilton collection. Originally housed in an NGC old fattie graded AU55 with a CAC gold sticker. The catalog description: It is challenging to find an 1815/2 half dollar with any degree of eye appeal. They are by and large a dull lot, and many of the surviving pieces are impaired in one way or another. The present coin is a wonderful exception. Originally toned in attractive blue, violet, and tangerine-gold toning, both sides are brightly lustrous and sharply struck. Aside from the inevitable die clashing, there are no marks of consequence. Housed in an early generation NGC holder from about 25 years ago (with hologram but without the barcode), this Choice About Uncirculated coin carries the CAC gold sticker indicating it is undergraded by at least one level. An interesting bit of trivia about the 1815/2 is that the entire lot of coins struck in early Jan 1816 were paid out a single customer: Jones, Firth and Co. How often can we trace provenance and know with certainty the original owner?

1815/2 50C AU58+ PCGS #6108

O.101, R2. CAC. From the George Hamilton collection. Originally housed in an NGC old fattie graded AU55 with a CAC gold sticker. The catalog description: It is challenging to find an 1815/2 half dollar with any degree of eye appeal. They are by and large a dull lot, and many of the surviving pieces are impaired in one way or another. The present coin is a wonderful exception. Originally toned in attractive blue, violet, and tangerine-gold toning, both sides are brightly lustrous and sharply struck. Aside from the inevitable die clashing, there are no marks of consequence. Housed in an early generation NGC holder from about 25 years ago (with hologram but without the barcode), this Choice About Uncirculated coin carries the CAC gold sticker indicating it is undergraded by at least one level. An interesting bit of trivia about the 1815/2 is that the entire lot of coins struck in early Jan 1816 were paid out a single customer: Jones, Firth and Co. How often can we trace provenance and know with certainty the original owner?

1815/2 50C AU58+ PCGS #6108

O.101, R2. CAC. From the George Hamilton collection. Originally housed in an NGC old fattie graded AU55 with a CAC gold sticker. The catalog description: It is challenging to find an 1815/2 half dollar with any degree of eye appeal. They are by and large a dull lot, and many of the surviving pieces are impaired in one way or another. The present coin is a wonderful exception. Originally toned in attractive blue, violet, and tangerine-gold toning, both sides are brightly lustrous and sharply struck. Aside from the inevitable die clashing, there are no marks of consequence. Housed in an early generation NGC holder from about 25 years ago (with hologram but without the barcode), this Choice About Uncirculated coin carries the CAC gold sticker indicating it is undergraded by at least one level. An interesting bit of trivia about the 1815/2 is that the entire lot of coins struck in early Jan 1816 were paid out a single customer: Jones, Firth and Co. How often can we trace provenance and know with certainty the original owner?

1816 1C VF30BN PCGS #1591

N6, R2

1816 1C VF30BN PCGS #1591

N6, R2

1817 50C VF30 PCGS #39497

O.105a, R4.

1817 50C VF30 PCGS #39497

O.105a, R4.

1817 50C AU50 PCGS #6109

O.111a, R1. Proof-like obverse surfaces. Meaty definition on both sides. Subtle but pretty toning. From the 1946 ANA convention sale by Numismatic Gallery (Kosoff/Kreisberg) in Davenport, Iowa. Lot 1728, graded VF and purchased for $2.90, according to the original coin envelope.

1817 50C AU50 PCGS #6109

O.111a, R1. Proof-like obverse surfaces. Meaty definition on both sides. Subtle but pretty toning. From the 1946 ANA convention sale by Numismatic Gallery (Kosoff/Kreisberg) in Davenport, Iowa. Lot 1728, graded VF and purchased for $2.90, according to the original coin envelope.

1817 50C AU53 PCGS #39516

O.106a, R3. Ex-Witham.

1817 50C AU53 PCGS #39516

O.106a, R3. Ex-Witham.

1817 50C AU53 PCGS #39516

O.106a, R3. Ex-Witham.

1817 50C AU58 PCGS #6109

O.110, R2.

1817 50C AU58 PCGS #6109

O.110, R2.

1817 50C AU58 PCGS #6109

O.107 R3.

1817 50C AU58 PCGS #6109

O.107 R3.

1817 1C 13 Stars AU58BN PCGS #36565

N6, R1. Jules Reiver, George Ramont collections. NGC cert# 308041-001

1817 1C 13 Stars AU58BN PCGS #36565

N6, R1. Jules Reiver, George Ramont collections. NGC cert# 308041-001

1817 50C AU58+ PCGS #6109

O.112a, R2. For 1817 Chief Engraver Scot produced a new MD and struck new WH from which WD were made. Relief was somewhat lowered and central hair details were modified...thinner and more detailed, as were the folds in the cap. Liberty got a nose job, smaller and more attractive, and the relief of her cheek and jaw was improved. And yet not enough WD's were produced and the Mint had to rely on earlier ones, using an 1814 first (the ultra-rare 1817/4 variety), the obverse of which quickly broke after a handful of struck coins. The old 1813 die lasted longer, striking tens of thousands. For inspection, here is a pretty example from this tough year. This CBH has excellent luster with just a hint of toning at the periphery. An EDS obverse is paired with a shattered reverse giving this eye appealing coin nice character.

1817 50C AU58+ PCGS #6109

O.112a, R2. For 1817 Chief Engraver Scot produced a new MD and struck new WH from which WD were made. Relief was somewhat lowered and central hair details were modified...thinner and more detailed, as were the folds in the cap. Liberty got a nose job, smaller and more attractive, and the relief of her cheek and jaw was improved. And yet not enough WD's were produced and the Mint had to rely on earlier ones, using an 1814 first (the ultra-rare 1817/4 variety), the obverse of which quickly broke after a handful of struck coins. The old 1813 die lasted longer, striking tens of thousands. For inspection, here is a pretty example from this tough year. This CBH has excellent luster with just a hint of toning at the periphery. An EDS obverse is paired with a shattered reverse giving this eye appealing coin nice character.

1817 50C MS62 PCGS #6109

O.113a, R4. OGH Cataloger's description: An intensely lustrous example with a ring of pastel rose and copper toning that floats through the stars and legend. Die breaks pass through and over the date. The surfaces are free of blemishes save for a short hairline at the tip of star 4. This is an eye-catching coin! From the Davignon Collection, acquired at Stack’s-Bowers’ Nov. 2012 Baltimore sale, lot 1676.

1817 50C MS62 PCGS #6109

O.113a, R4. OGH Cataloger's description: An intensely lustrous example with a ring of pastel rose and copper toning that floats through the stars and legend. Die breaks pass through and over the date. The surfaces are free of blemishes save for a short hairline at the tip of star 4. This is an eye-catching coin! From the Davignon Collection, acquired at Stack’s-Bowers’ Nov. 2012 Baltimore sale, lot 1676.

1817/3 50C AU55 PCGS #6111

O.101a, R2. The 1817/3 is a very popular overdate, as the underlying 3 is patently visible on the lone die marriage (the presence of the reverse die crack, from M in AMERICA through the denomination and up along UNITED, is what distinguishes this later die state). It is relatively scarce in all grades and downright difficult in grades above VF. Weak strikes are common with the usual difficult locations: eagle's left wing, head and beak, the obverse center. Even Liberty's profile is known to be poorly struck.

1817/3 50C AU55 PCGS #6111

O.101a, R2. The 1817/3 is a very popular overdate, as the underlying 3 is patently visible on the lone die marriage (the presence of the reverse die crack, from M in AMERICA through the denomination and up along UNITED, is what distinguishes this later die state). It is relatively scarce in all grades and downright difficult in grades above VF. Weak strikes are common with the usual difficult locations: eagle's left wing, head and beak, the obverse center. Even Liberty's profile is known to be poorly struck.

1817/3 50C AU55 PCGS #6111

O.101a, R2. The 1817/3 is a very popular overdate, as the underlying 3 is patently visible on the lone die marriage (the presence of the reverse die crack, from M in AMERICA through the denomination and up along UNITED, is what distinguishes this later die state). It is relatively scarce in all grades and downright difficult in grades above VF. Weak strikes are common with the usual difficult locations: eagle's left wing, head and beak, the obverse center. Even Liberty's profile is known to be poorly struck.

1818 50C VG8 PCGS #39535

O.115a, R4+.

1818 50C VG8 PCGS #39535

O.115a, R4+.

1818 50C VF30 PCGS #39527

O.110, R4.

1818 50C VF30 PCGS #39527

O.110, R4.

1818 1C XF40BN PCGS #36619

N7 die state B, R1

1818 1C XF40BN PCGS #36619

N7 die state B, R1

1818 50C AU50 PCGS #39524

O.108, R1. "Pincher 8's".

1818 50C AU50 PCGS #39524

O.108, R1. "Pincher 8's".

1818 50C AU50 PCGS #39524

O.108, R1. "Pincher 8's".

1818 50C AU50 PCGS #6113

O.112, R1

1818 50C AU50 PCGS #6113

O.112, R1

1818 50C AU53 PCGS #6113

O.111, R1. NGC AU50 cert# 3808751-003

1818 50C AU53 PCGS #6113

O.111, R1. NGC AU50 cert# 3808751-003

1818 50C AU55 PCGS #6113

O.107, R1. This is the cocked T or slanted T variety. Other interesting year date varieties include the spiked cap and pincher 8, none of which is significant enough to be included as major varieties for the Redbook or registry sets. Note the prominent clashing of eagle's wings on the obverse and, to a lesser extent, Liberty's bust and portrait on the reverse. The often-present shield details can be seen at Liberty's ear. This example is lustrous and handsomely toned with rim accents in red, green and gold. CAC in its former AU55 PCGS holder cert# 12588340. ex-Meyer collection.

1818 50C AU55 PCGS #6113

O.107, R1. This is the cocked T or slanted T variety. Other interesting year date varieties include the spiked cap and pincher 8, none of which is significant enough to be included as major varieties for the Redbook or registry sets. Note the prominent clashing of eagle's wings on the obverse and, to a lesser extent, Liberty's bust and portrait on the reverse. The often-present shield details can be seen at Liberty's ear. This example is lustrous and handsomely toned with rim accents in red, green and gold. CAC in its former AU55 PCGS holder cert# 12588340. ex-Meyer collection.

1818 50C AU55 PCGS #6113

O.107, R1. This is the cocked T or slanted T variety. Other interesting year date varieties include the spiked cap and pincher 8, none of which is significant enough to be included as major varieties for the Redbook or registry sets. Note the prominent clashing of eagle's wings on the obverse and, to a lesser extent, Liberty's bust and portrait on the reverse. The often-present shield details can be seen at Liberty's ear. This example is lustrous and handsomely toned with rim accents in red, green and gold. CAC in its former AU55 PCGS holder cert# 12588340. ex-Meyer collection.

1818 50C AU58 PCGS #6113

O.109, R2. CAC.

1818 50C AU58 PCGS #6113

O.109, R2. CAC.

1818 50C AU58+ PCGS #6113

O.104a, R3. CAC.

1818 50C AU58+ PCGS #6113

O.104a, R3. CAC.

1818/7 50C Large 8 XF45 PCGS #6115

O.103, R3. The large 8 overdate is represented by two die marriages sharing the same obverse WD. O.101 and O.103. The underlying 7 show its ears at the top and the bar connecting them are clearly visible. Often part of the leg of the 7 appears in the loops below. A nice, clear overdate. The large 8 variety is scarcer than the small 8, with the O.103 being very scarce at the XF grade. This attractively toned example has a genuine, original appearance.

1818/7 50C Large 8 XF45 PCGS #6115

O.103, R3. The large 8 overdate is represented by two die marriages sharing the same obverse WD. O.101 and O.103. The underlying 7 show its ears at the top and the bar connecting them are clearly visible. Often part of the leg of the 7 appears in the loops below. A nice, clear overdate. The large 8 variety is scarcer than the small 8, with the O.103 being very scarce at the XF grade. This attractively toned example has a genuine, original appearance.

1818/7 50C Large 8 XF45 PCGS #6115

O.103, R3. The large 8 overdate is represented by two die marriages sharing the same obverse WD. O.101 and O.103. The underlying 7 show its ears at the top and the bar connecting them are clearly visible. Often part of the leg of the 7 appears in the loops below. A nice, clear overdate. The large 8 variety is scarcer than the small 8, with the O.103 being very scarce at the XF grade. This attractively toned example has a genuine, original appearance.

1818/7 50C Small 8 AU55+ PCGS #6114

O.102, R2. Here's a very special CBH, ex-Dick Graham, ex-Tom Palmer. Not only is it a desirable overdate and the unique marriage of the small 8. It is also an EDS and well struck to boot! The 1818 overdates were generally weak-to-good strikes. The small 8 was made from a new lowered-relief hub and generally appears weaker in the center. Yet this example is relatively strong in the center (curls and clasp are well defined) and comes from an early die. Note the complete dentils and well formed stars. Note too the absence of the filled upper loop of the second 8 which happened when a die chip broke off. The reverse is equally early and well defined. Top it all off with sunburst colors of orange and coral, and flashy blue rims with mark-free surfaces. Full, rolling luster on the reverse with just the slightest break on the obverse. (Was AU55 CAC cert# 30431364)

1818/7 50C Small 8 AU55+ PCGS #6114

O.102, R2. Here's a very special CBH, ex-Dick Graham, ex-Tom Palmer. Not only is it a desirable overdate and the unique marriage of the small 8. It is also an EDS and well struck to boot! The 1818 overdates were generally weak-to-good strikes. The small 8 was made from a new lowered-relief hub and generally appears weaker in the center. Yet this example is relatively strong in the center (curls and clasp are well defined) and comes from an early die. Note the complete dentils and well formed stars. Note too the absence of the filled upper loop of the second 8 which happened when a die chip broke off. The reverse is equally early and well defined. Top it all off with sunburst colors of orange and coral, and flashy blue rims with mark-free surfaces. Full, rolling luster on the reverse with just the slightest break on the obverse. (Was AU55 CAC cert# 30431364)

1818/7 50C Small 8 AU55+ PCGS #6114

O.102, R2. Here's a very special CBH, ex-Dick Graham, ex-Tom Palmer. Not only is it a desirable overdate and the unique marriage of the small 8. It is also an EDS and well struck to boot! The 1818 overdates were generally weak-to-good strikes. The small 8 was made from a new lowered-relief hub and generally appears weaker in the center. Yet this example is relatively strong in the center (curls and clasp are well defined) and comes from an early die. Note the complete dentils and well formed stars. Note too the absence of the filled upper loop of the second 8 which happened when a die chip broke off. The reverse is equally early and well defined. Top it all off with sunburst colors of orange and coral, and flashy blue rims with mark-free surfaces. Full, rolling luster on the reverse with just the slightest break on the obverse. (Was AU55 CAC cert# 30431364)

1818/7 50C Large 8 AU58 PCGS #6115

O.101a, R1. The large 8 overdate is represented by two die marriages sharing the same obverse WD. O.101 and O.103. The underlying 7 show its ears at the top and the bar connecting them are clearly visible. Often part of the leg of the 7 appears in the loops below. A nice, clear overdate. The large 8 variety is scarcer than the small 8, with the O.103 being very scarce at the XF grade. This example possesses dazzling luster and vivid, colorful toning.

1818/7 50C Large 8 AU58 PCGS #6115

O.101a, R1. The large 8 overdate is represented by two die marriages sharing the same obverse WD. O.101 and O.103. The underlying 7 show its ears at the top and the bar connecting them are clearly visible. Often part of the leg of the 7 appears in the loops below. A nice, clear overdate. The large 8 variety is scarcer than the small 8, with the O.103 being very scarce at the XF grade. This example possesses dazzling luster and vivid, colorful toning.

1818/7 50C Large 8 AU58 PCGS #6115

O.101a, R1. The large 8 overdate is represented by two die marriages sharing the same obverse WD. O.101 and O.103. The underlying 7 show its ears at the top and the bar connecting them are clearly visible. Often part of the leg of the 7 appears in the loops below. A nice, clear overdate. The large 8 variety is scarcer than the small 8, with the O.103 being very scarce at the XF grade. This example possesses dazzling luster and vivid, colorful toning.

1819 50C VF30 PCGS #39553

O.114, R3

1819 50C VF30 PCGS #39553

O.114, R3

1819 1C Small Date XF45BN PCGS #36649

N8, R1. NGC 3218304-005

1819 1C Small Date XF45BN PCGS #36649

N8, R1. NGC 3218304-005

1819 50C AU50 PCGS #6117

O.112, R3. Was ICG AU50 cert# 3892260701

1819 50C AU50 PCGS #6117

O.112, R3. Was ICG AU50 cert# 3892260701

1819 50C AU55 PCGS #39553

O.114, R3.

1819 50C AU55 PCGS #39553

O.114, R3.

1819 50C AU58 PCGS #6117

O.113 R1. During 1819 the Mint struck a respectable 2.2 million half dollars using fifteen different die marriages. Five were overdates and ten, yeardates. This flashy yeardate is from the Dale Heisler collection and it's notable for its proof-like surfaces, EDS and full strike. A handsome gold album tone is present at the rims.

1819 50C AU58 PCGS #6117

O.113 R1. During 1819 the Mint struck a respectable 2.2 million half dollars using fifteen different die marriages. Five were overdates and ten, yeardates. This flashy yeardate is from the Dale Heisler collection and it's notable for its proof-like surfaces, EDS and full strike. A handsome gold album tone is present at the rims.

1819 50C AU58+ PCGS #39544

O.108, R3. CAC.

1819 50C AU58+ PCGS #39544

O.108, R3. CAC.

1819 50C MS62 PCGS #6117

O.115, R3.

1819 50C MS62 PCGS #6117

O.115, R3.

1819/8 50C Large 9 AU53 PCGS #6119

O.104, R1. A fun variety due to its quirky stars and bizarrely recut S2. Four die marriages, not five, produced large 9 varieties.

1819/8 50C Large 9 AU53 PCGS #6119

O.104, R1. A fun variety due to its quirky stars and bizarrely recut S2. Four die marriages, not five, produced large 9 varieties.

1819/8 50C Large 9 AU53 PCGS #6119

O.104, R1. A fun variety due to its quirky stars and bizarrely recut S2. Four die marriages, not five, produced large 9 varieties.

1819/8 50C Large 9 AU53 PCGS #6119

O.102, R2. Was NGC AU55 cert# 36704060-020 w/ CAC

1819/8 50C Large 9 AU53 PCGS #6119

O.102, R2. Was NGC AU55 cert# 36704060-020 w/ CAC

1819/8 50C Large 9 AU53 PCGS #6119

O.102, R2. Was NGC AU55 cert# 36704060-020 w/ CAC

1819/8 50C Large 9 AU53 PCGS #6119

O.105, R2. Although still considered an overdate by Overton, the major TPG's and the Redbook, this die marriage has been proven to not be. Researchers found, based on the emission sequence, the fact that the 1 is not flat topped like the other overdates, and microscopic examination showing no evidence of an underlying 8, that the probable cause was a graving slip. This example is an EDS with a nice strike and plenty of remaining luster in spite of the obvious dip in its past.

1819/8 50C Large 9 AU53 PCGS #6119

O.105, R2. Although still considered an overdate by Overton, the major TPG's and the Redbook, this die marriage has been proven to not be. Researchers found, based on the emission sequence, the fact that the 1 is not flat topped like the other overdates, and microscopic examination showing no evidence of an underlying 8, that the probable cause was a graving slip. This example is an EDS with a nice strike and plenty of remaining luster in spite of the obvious dip in its past.

1819/8 50C Large 9 AU53 PCGS #6119

O.105, R2. Although still considered an overdate by Overton, the major TPG's and the Redbook, this die marriage has been proven to not be. Researchers found, based on the emission sequence, the fact that the 1 is not flat topped like the other overdates, and microscopic examination showing no evidence of an underlying 8, that the probable cause was a graving slip. This example is an EDS with a nice strike and plenty of remaining luster in spite of the obvious dip in its past.

1819/8 50C Small 9 AU58 PCGS #6118

O.101, R1 Shown here is the unique small 9 overdate marriage and the first of a total of five. The underlying 8 is plain to see in several places around the lower section of the nine. The obverse, shrouded in electric blue, shows striking detail, particularly evident in the hair curls, star centers and points, and in the drapery folds. Overdates are rarely struck-up well. Previously used dies are often lapped in preparation of the numeral change and the die's reuse. The reverse mimics the obverse's color at the rims which then blends to pretty sunset toning. Although graded AU58 by PCGS, the half shows no sign of rub or wear at all, and should probably be graded MS.

1819/8 50C Small 9 AU58 PCGS #6118

O.101, R1 Shown here is the unique small 9 overdate marriage and the first of a total of five. The underlying 8 is plain to see in several places around the lower section of the nine. The obverse, shrouded in electric blue, shows striking detail, particularly evident in the hair curls, star centers and points, and in the drapery folds. Overdates are rarely struck-up well. Previously used dies are often lapped in preparation of the numeral change and the die's reuse. The reverse mimics the obverse's color at the rims which then blends to pretty sunset toning. Although graded AU58 by PCGS, the half shows no sign of rub or wear at all, and should probably be graded MS.

1819/8 50C Small 9 AU58 PCGS #6118

O.101, R1 Shown here is the unique small 9 overdate marriage and the first of a total of five. The underlying 8 is plain to see in several places around the lower section of the nine. The obverse, shrouded in electric blue, shows striking detail, particularly evident in the hair curls, star centers and points, and in the drapery folds. Overdates are rarely struck-up well. Previously used dies are often lapped in preparation of the numeral change and the die's reuse. The reverse mimics the obverse's color at the rims which then blends to pretty sunset toning. Although graded AU58 by PCGS, the half shows no sign of rub or wear at all, and should probably be graded MS.

1820 1C Large Date VF25BN PCGS #1615

N15, R1. Cracked for Dansco.

1820 1C Large Date VF25BN PCGS #1615

N15, R1. Cracked for Dansco.

1820 50C Curl Base 2, Small Date AU50 PCGS #6121

O.103b (late die state, crack at 50c, rarity TBD). This example of a curl 2, small date was acquired for its unspoiled, original appearance. Rarely has a 200 year old silver coin not been conserved at some point in its life. This one appears to have lots of 19th century dirt. Nice and crusty with very respectable luster.

1820 50C Curl Base 2, Small Date AU50 PCGS #6121

O.103b (late die state, crack at 50c, rarity TBD). This example of a curl 2, small date was acquired for its unspoiled, original appearance. Rarely has a 200 year old silver coin not been conserved at some point in its life. This one appears to have lots of 19th century dirt. Nice and crusty with very respectable luster.

1820 50C Square 2, Large Date, Knob 2 AU55 PCGS #6122

O.105a, R3. 1820 is the third lowest mintage of the series with only slightly more struck than in 1807. Deducting for the overdates explains why the 1820 is considered a key to the series with just six non-overdate varieties. Several different style 2 punches were used. Square and curled bases, knobbed and not, producing a total of four major varieties from 8 total marriages. Shown here is the square 2 with knob, large date. Originally graded AU55 by NGC (cert# 3419620-012) it crossed at PCGS. The half displays obverse weakness in the central details but an impression suggesting an EDS (crisp, complete stars, full dentils), wrapped in crusty, dirty appearance.

1820 50C Square 2, Large Date, Knob 2 AU55 PCGS #6122

O.105a, R3. 1820 is the third lowest mintage of the series with only slightly more struck than in 1807. Deducting for the overdates explains why the 1820 is considered a key to the series with just six non-overdate varieties. Several different style 2 punches were used. Square and curled bases, knobbed and not, producing a total of four major varieties from 8 total marriages. Shown here is the square 2 with knob, large date. Originally graded AU55 by NGC (cert# 3419620-012) it crossed at PCGS. The half displays obverse weakness in the central details but an impression suggesting an EDS (crisp, complete stars, full dentils), wrapped in crusty, dirty appearance.

1820 50C Square 2, Large Date, No Knob AU58 PCGS #6123

O.108 R2. This is a very special variety from the Roger Solomon collection. It is a Class IV doubled die (offset hub doubling from centers misaligned). Not shelf doubling...true hub doubling. The reverse WD was slightly offset during its second hub impression, leaving visible doubling on the left wing, talons, claws, leaves, berries and arrow heads. Lovely sunburst rim toning is seen over flashy, clean surfaces, along with bountiful luster on an EDS, full denticles. An exceptional AU58.

1820 50C Square 2, Large Date, No Knob AU58 PCGS #6123

O.108 R2. This is a very special variety from the Roger Solomon collection. It is a Class IV doubled die (offset hub doubling from centers misaligned). Not shelf doubling...true hub doubling. The reverse WD was slightly offset during its second hub impression, leaving visible doubling on the left wing, talons, claws, leaves, berries and arrow heads. Lovely sunburst rim toning is seen over flashy, clean surfaces, along with bountiful luster on an EDS, full denticles. An exceptional AU58.

1820 50C Square 2, Large Date, Knob 2 AU58 PCGS #6122

O.104, R4. Eric P. Newman Collection, ex-Col. E.H.R. Green as NGC MS61 cert# 2037647-069

1820 50C Square 2, Large Date, Knob 2 AU58 PCGS #6122

O.104, R4. Eric P. Newman Collection, ex-Col. E.H.R. Green as NGC MS61 cert# 2037647-069

1820/19 50C Square Base 2 AU58 PCGS #6125

O.101, R2. CAC 1820 was the 4th consecutive year for bust half overdates. And it was a spectacular one, with two varieties each of which boldly display the underrate. This is the square base 2 variety, somewhat scarcer, and while the underdate 9 may not be as prominent as the curl base 2 variety it shows the underdate 1 a tad better. The knob of the 9's tail can be seen at the lower left inside of the 0. Other researchers (Edgar Souder, William Atkinson) feel certain it is an 1820/19/18 based on microscopic image overlays. Both 1820/19's tend to carry a premium over price guides.

1820/19 50C Square Base 2 AU58 PCGS #6125

O.101, R2. CAC 1820 was the 4th consecutive year for bust half overdates. And it was a spectacular one, with two varieties each of which boldly display the underrate. This is the square base 2 variety, somewhat scarcer, and while the underdate 9 may not be as prominent as the curl base 2 variety it shows the underdate 1 a tad better. The knob of the 9's tail can be seen at the lower left inside of the 0. Other researchers (Edgar Souder, William Atkinson) feel certain it is an 1820/19/18 based on microscopic image overlays. Both 1820/19's tend to carry a premium over price guides.

1820/19 50C Square Base 2 AU58 PCGS #6125

O.101, R2. CAC 1820 was the 4th consecutive year for bust half overdates. And it was a spectacular one, with two varieties each of which boldly display the underrate. This is the square base 2 variety, somewhat scarcer, and while the underdate 9 may not be as prominent as the curl base 2 variety it shows the underdate 1 a tad better. The knob of the 9's tail can be seen at the lower left inside of the 0. Other researchers (Edgar Souder, William Atkinson) feel certain it is an 1820/19/18 based on microscopic image overlays. Both 1820/19's tend to carry a premium over price guides.

1821 50C VF30 PCGS #39581

O.104a, R2.

1821 50C VF30 PCGS #39581

O.104a, R2.

1821 1C VF30BN PCGS #1621

N2, R1.

1821 1C VF30BN PCGS #1621

N2, R1.

1821 50C AU53 PCGS #6128

O.102, R1

1821 50C AU53 PCGS #6128

O.102, R1

1821 50C AU55 PCGS #6128

O.101, R1. A very pleasant early bust half. Bold strike, strong luster, and original toning. Some proof like surfaces can be seen in the colorful areas between the stars and between the legend letters.

1821 50C AU55 PCGS #6128

O.101, R1. A very pleasant early bust half. Bold strike, strong luster, and original toning. Some proof like surfaces can be seen in the colorful areas between the stars and between the legend letters.

1821 50C AU55 PCGS #6128

O.107, R3

1821 50C AU55 PCGS #6128

O.107, R3

1821 50C AU58 PCGS #6128

O.105, R1. 1821 was marked by a small mintage (1.3 million pieces), likely smaller still as many were undoubtedly 1820's struck early in the year. Just 7 marriages resulted with no remarkable varieties. Most are well struck, as is this EDS example. When weak it was in predictable areas...center obverse, eagle's left wing, and banner. Experts believe the 1821 to be an undervalued sleeper and scarce at AU55 and above. This CBH, formerly a blue ANACS AU58 cert# 4162328), is a fully lustrous example with a thin ring of light album toning at the rims. It has more chatter from bag hits than I like, unfortunately.

1821 50C AU58 PCGS #6128

O.105, R1. 1821 was marked by a small mintage (1.3 million pieces), likely smaller still as many were undoubtedly 1820's struck early in the year. Just 7 marriages resulted with no remarkable varieties. Most are well struck, as is this EDS example. When weak it was in predictable areas...center obverse, eagle's left wing, and banner. Experts believe the 1821 to be an undervalued sleeper and scarce at AU55 and above. This CBH, formerly a blue ANACS AU58 cert# 4162328), is a fully lustrous example with a thin ring of light album toning at the rims. It has more chatter from bag hits than I like, unfortunately.

1821 50C AU58 PCGS #6128

O.103, R2. Broken serifs on E, A. Was NGC AU58 cert# 332790-023

1821 50C AU58 PCGS #6128

O.103, R2. Broken serifs on E, A. Was NGC AU58 cert# 332790-023

1821 50C AU58 PCGS #6128

O.104a, R1. 1821 was marked by a small mintage (1.3 million pieces), likely smaller still as many were undoubtedly 1820's struck early in the year. Just 7 marriages resulted with no remarkable varieties. Most are well struck, as is this EDS example. When weak it was in predictable areas...center obverse, eagle's left wing, and banner. Experts believe the 1821 to be an undervalued sleeper and very scarce at AU55 and above. This example has a favorite look: soft rose, gold and amber with rims of blue, green and yellow. Undoubtedly from many years in album storage.

1821 50C AU58 PCGS #6128

O.104a, R1. 1821 was marked by a small mintage (1.3 million pieces), likely smaller still as many were undoubtedly 1820's struck early in the year. Just 7 marriages resulted with no remarkable varieties. Most are well struck, as is this EDS example. When weak it was in predictable areas...center obverse, eagle's left wing, and banner. Experts believe the 1821 to be an undervalued sleeper and very scarce at AU55 and above. This example has a favorite look: soft rose, gold and amber with rims of blue, green and yellow. Undoubtedly from many years in album storage.

1821 50C AU58 PCGS #39584

O.106, R1. Lovely mark-free coin in uncirculated condition. Some light scattered hairlines from old cleaning but enough to bodybag it.

1821 50C AU58 PCGS #39584

O.106, R1. Lovely mark-free coin in uncirculated condition. Some light scattered hairlines from old cleaning but enough to bodybag it.

1821 50C AU58 PCGS #39585

R1. Ex-Link.

1821 50C AU58 PCGS #39585

R1. Ex-Link.

1822 1C VF30BN PCGS #1624

N5, R3

1822 1C VF30BN PCGS #1624

N5, R3

1822 50C AU53 PCGS #6129

O.105, R3. Was NGC AU53, cert# 3808764-020.

1822 50C AU53 PCGS #6129

O.105, R3. Was NGC AU53, cert# 3808764-020.

1822 50C AU53 PCGS #39600

O.112, R4.

1822 50C AU53 PCGS #39600

O.112, R4.

1822 50C AU55 PCGS #6129

O.111, R2. Was NGC AU55 cert# 1718248-009

1822 50C AU55 PCGS #6129

O.111, R2. Was NGC AU55 cert# 1718248-009

1822 50C AU55 PCGS #6129

O.109, R2. CAC. Ex-Jim Ross, ex-Tom Powell.

1822 50C AU55 PCGS #6129

O.109, R2. CAC. Ex-Jim Ross, ex-Tom Powell.

1822 50C AU55 PCGS #6129

O.110a, R2. Ex-Meyer, ex-Jim Ross.

1822 50C AU55 PCGS #6129

O.110a, R2. Ex-Meyer, ex-Jim Ross.

1822 50C AU55 PCGS #6129

O.115, R3. 1822 would have been a forgettable year for the CBH series were it not for two notable varieties. The peculiar button-cap O.107. And the Large E's varieties (O.114 and O.115). Here's an example of the latter, from the Elton Dosier and Gehring Prouty collections. Note the larger E's in the legend. These somewhat scarce varieties are accompanied by A's with missing inner serifs (an ideal way to spot the variety). This half has a very respectable strike with none of the usual weak areas, full denticles, crisp stars and clean surfaces. Medium gold/gray in color, it has excellent luster as well. The reverse die crack adds a little personality to this tough variety. Ex-Dosier, ex-Prouty.

1822 50C AU55 PCGS #6129

O.115, R3. 1822 would have been a forgettable year for the CBH series were it not for two notable varieties. The peculiar button-cap O.107. And the Large E's varieties (O.114 and O.115). Here's an example of the latter, from the Elton Dosier and Gehring Prouty collections. Note the larger E's in the legend. These somewhat scarce varieties are accompanied by A's with missing inner serifs (an ideal way to spot the variety). This half has a very respectable strike with none of the usual weak areas, full denticles, crisp stars and clean surfaces. Medium gold/gray in color, it has excellent luster as well. The reverse die crack adds a little personality to this tough variety. Ex-Dosier, ex-Prouty.

1822 50C AU55 PCGS #39588

O.103a, R5-

1822 50C AU55 PCGS #39588

O.103a, R5-

1822 50C AU55 PCGS #6129

O.114, R3

1822 50C AU55 PCGS #6129

O.114, R3

1822 50C AU58 PCGS #39589

O.104, R3. NGC cert# 307258-001

1822 50C AU58 PCGS #39589

O.104, R3. NGC cert# 307258-001

1822 50C AU58 PCGS #39591

O.106, R3. Ex-Eliasberg, ex Dr. Charles Link.

1822 50C AU58 PCGS #39591

O.106, R3. Ex-Eliasberg, ex Dr. Charles Link.

1822 50C MS62 PCGS #6129

O.108a, R3. Was CAC as an AU58 with cert# 5725105 (misattributed as an 1825)

1822 50C MS62 PCGS #6129

O.108a, R3. Was CAC as an AU58 with cert# 5725105 (misattributed as an 1825)

1822 50C MS63 PCGS #6129

O.113, R3. Cataloger's description: From the Davignon collection, found on the bourse floor during the 2003 ANA Convention. A blast of vibrant luster greets the eye. Frosty, untoned centers are framed with halos of russet toning. There is not a hint of friction on the devices; contact marks are virtually non-existent. The strike is first rate. In short, an ideal coin for an ambitious type or date collector. This was the last coin consigned to the sale. Keith uncovered and purchased an ethereal `22-113 at the recent Baltimore show. He explained, “[It] did indeed turn out to be a [George] Plimpton [family] Hoard coin. It was lot 700 in the 1981 NASCA sale of the Providence Collection, one of the 3 confirmed Plimpton Hoard auctions. I was able to identify it with 100% certainty from position of minor toning spots in the catalog photos.” Keith’s sleuthing and good fortune shook loose the coin offered here.

1822 50C MS63 PCGS #6129

O.113, R3. Cataloger's description: From the Davignon collection, found on the bourse floor during the 2003 ANA Convention. A blast of vibrant luster greets the eye. Frosty, untoned centers are framed with halos of russet toning. There is not a hint of friction on the devices; contact marks are virtually non-existent. The strike is first rate. In short, an ideal coin for an ambitious type or date collector. This was the last coin consigned to the sale. Keith uncovered and purchased an ethereal `22-113 at the recent Baltimore show. He explained, “[It] did indeed turn out to be a [George] Plimpton [family] Hoard coin. It was lot 700 in the 1981 NASCA sale of the Providence Collection, one of the 3 confirmed Plimpton Hoard auctions. I was able to identify it with 100% certainty from position of minor toning spots in the catalog photos.” Keith’s sleuthing and good fortune shook loose the coin offered here.

1822/1 50C AU50 PCGS #39605

O.102, R4+. Cataloger's description: A killer R.4 – and perhaps the only true overdate of the year. (The jury is still out on the question whether the O.101 is in fact an overdate.) This is a very pretty example, much nicer than the similarly graded coin offered by Heritage in Dec. 2010, lot 7934. Iridescent gold and turquoise toning at the peripheries enhances the eye appeal. The surfaces are almost free of contact marks. Do not pass up a chance to capture an eye appealing `22/1-102!

1822/1 50C AU50 PCGS #39605

O.102, R4+. Cataloger's description: A killer R.4 – and perhaps the only true overdate of the year. (The jury is still out on the question whether the O.101 is in fact an overdate.) This is a very pretty example, much nicer than the similarly graded coin offered by Heritage in Dec. 2010, lot 7934. Iridescent gold and turquoise toning at the peripheries enhances the eye appeal. The surfaces are almost free of contact marks. Do not pass up a chance to capture an eye appealing `22/1-102!

1822/1 50C AU58+ PCGS #6130

O.101, R2. ex-Davignon

1822/1 50C AU58+ PCGS #6130

O.101, R2. ex-Davignon

1823 50C Broken 3 AU50 PCGS #6132

O.101, R3 (BHNC R1). 1823 gave us some fun varieties, particularly due to weird 3 numerals in the date. We have the broken 3, patched 3, ugly 3...even the tampered-with 3. The 3 punch had not been used in 10 years and the new style punch, with its curvy upper loop (as opposed to a straight top 3 last used in 1813,) is believed to have been defective. But deemed good enough. It was used to produce O.101 broken 3 halves. Al Overton suggested that the top half of a 2 punch was used twice and that is why the 3 appears broken. But diagnostics prove the shape was not correct. Early research blamed an inept Mint worker, substituting for a gravely ill Robert Scot (Kneass was not hired until Jan 1824). It is illogical to assume he blundered just once and afterward produced flawless 3's. Whatever the case the broken 3 variety is very collectible and it took a few purchases before this one was acquired. It was submitted for photographing and was purchased on the spot. It has a lovely album toning appearance, awash in sea blue and green, marigold and rust, with splendid luster, and virtually mark-free surfaces.

1823 50C Broken 3 AU50 PCGS #6132

O.101, R3 (BHNC R1). 1823 gave us some fun varieties, particularly due to weird 3 numerals in the date. We have the broken 3, patched 3, ugly 3...even the tampered-with 3. The 3 punch had not been used in 10 years and the new style punch, with its curvy upper loop (as opposed to a straight top 3 last used in 1813,) is believed to have been defective. But deemed good enough. It was used to produce O.101 broken 3 halves. Al Overton suggested that the top half of a 2 punch was used twice and that is why the 3 appears broken. But diagnostics prove the shape was not correct. Early research blamed an inept Mint worker, substituting for a gravely ill Robert Scot (Kneass was not hired until Jan 1824). It is illogical to assume he blundered just once and afterward produced flawless 3's. Whatever the case the broken 3 variety is very collectible and it took a few purchases before this one was acquired. It was submitted for photographing and was purchased on the spot. It has a lovely album toning appearance, awash in sea blue and green, marigold and rust, with splendid luster, and virtually mark-free surfaces.

1823 50C AU50 PCGS #39614

O.109, R5+

1823 50C AU50 PCGS #39614

O.109, R5+

1823 50C Ugly 3 AU53 PCGS #6134

O.110a, R3, CAC. Dirty, prooflike surfaces. A lot can be said about the troublesome 3 in the 1823 varieties. Four different varieties resulted but not all from the same WD. The broken 3 (O.101) came from a new 3 punch and the less than satisfactory result was not touched up as would normally have happened. The patched 3 (O.101a, O.102) was a botched repair attempt to the same die. And the ugly 3 (O.110a) was due to a die crack from the rim upward which simply broke away the right side of the numeral. The fourth 3 variety -- not a recognized major one, the tampered-with 3 (O.106a), was likely due to a simple die chip and not inept tampering. Not all researchers agree on the causes for the calamity. But collectors enjoy them and it brings some excitement to an otherwise drab year. Ex-Troy Nelson (Allgood collection), ex-Dick Graham.

1823 50C Ugly 3 AU53 PCGS #6134

O.110a, R3, CAC. Dirty, prooflike surfaces. A lot can be said about the troublesome 3 in the 1823 varieties. Four different varieties resulted but not all from the same WD. The broken 3 (O.101) came from a new 3 punch and the less than satisfactory result was not touched up as would normally have happened. The patched 3 (O.101a, O.102) was a botched repair attempt to the same die. And the ugly 3 (O.110a) was due to a die crack from the rim upward which simply broke away the right side of the numeral. The fourth 3 variety -- not a recognized major one, the tampered-with 3 (O.106a), was likely due to a simple die chip and not inept tampering. Not all researchers agree on the causes for the calamity. But collectors enjoy them and it brings some excitement to an otherwise drab year. Ex-Troy Nelson (Allgood collection), ex-Dick Graham.

1823 50C AU58 PCGS #6131

O.104, R3. CAC.

1823 50C AU58 PCGS #6131

O.104, R3. CAC.

1823 50C AU58 PCGS #6131

O.112. R1. ex-CAC. Tall 3 variety. Great surfaces, color, and luster. Only the faintest touch of cabinet friction. Should probably be MS62. NTS: regrade

1823 50C AU58 PCGS #6131

O.112. R1. ex-CAC. Tall 3 variety. Great surfaces, color, and luster. Only the faintest touch of cabinet friction. Should probably be MS62. NTS: regrade

1823 50C AU58 PCGS #6131

O.103, R2

1823 50C AU58 PCGS #6131

O.103, R2

1823 50C AU58 PCGS #6131

O.111a, R2. Lot 380. Catalog description: Ice blue peripheries encircle the champagne glow that dominates each side of this lovely Choice AU half. The surfaces remain entirely free from singular, consequential blemishes, revealing just the faintest traces of handling across the high points upon investigation. Overall well pronounced in spite of the later die state, with a profound quadrupling to Liberty's profile dramatically apparent.

1823 50C AU58 PCGS #6131

O.111a, R2. Lot 380. Catalog description: Ice blue peripheries encircle the champagne glow that dominates each side of this lovely Choice AU half. The surfaces remain entirely free from singular, consequential blemishes, revealing just the faintest traces of handling across the high points upon investigation. Overall well pronounced in spite of the later die state, with a profound quadrupling to Liberty's profile dramatically apparent.

1823 50C MS61 PCGS #6131

O.106a, R2. Tampered-with 3 variety. Probably not really tampered with...more likely a simple die chip...but it rounds out the terrible 3's. Here we have brilliant, full luster with intense, colorful album toning. Nice strike, and very clean, proof-like surfaces.

1823 50C MS61 PCGS #6131

O.106a, R2. Tampered-with 3 variety. Probably not really tampered with...more likely a simple die chip...but it rounds out the terrible 3's. Here we have brilliant, full luster with intense, colorful album toning. Nice strike, and very clean, proof-like surfaces.

1823 50C MS61 PCGS #6131

O.107 , R2.

1823 50C MS61 PCGS #6131

O.107 , R2.

1823 50C MS62 PCGS #6131

O.105, R1

1823 50C MS62 PCGS #6131

O.105, R1

1823 50C MS62 PCGS #39613

O.108a, R3. ICG cert# 7802330601 Prooflike surfaces with a first-rate strike! Stars have points, curls and drapery are full, the scroll is complete and well impressed, feathers are detailed. Even the arrowheads have shafts. Double struck (see the jaw impression). The numerous obverse die cracks determine the die state (O.108a). So this is obviously not an EDS. The exceptional strike and surface condition may be best explained by die maintenance. It is known that the Mint, once again, was struggling with a vexing 3 numeral in the date. It would not be unusual to polish-up the dies before putting them to reuse. This coin was likely struck soon thereafter.

1823 50C MS62 PCGS #39613

O.108a, R3. ICG cert# 7802330601 Prooflike surfaces with a first-rate strike! Stars have points, curls and drapery are full, the scroll is complete and well impressed, feathers are detailed. Even the arrowheads have shafts. Double struck (see the jaw impression). The numerous obverse die cracks determine the die state (O.108a). So this is obviously not an EDS. The exceptional strike and surface condition may be best explained by die maintenance. It is known that the Mint, once again, was struggling with a vexing 3 numeral in the date. It would not be unusual to polish-up the dies before putting them to reuse. This coin was likely struck soon thereafter.

1823 50C Patched 3 MS62 PCGS #6133

O.101a, R1. At some point Mint officials chose to touch up the WD that had been producing broken 3 varieties. The results would turn out less than graceful. The softened die was struck with a short blunt punch to impart a connection to the separated 3 pieces and the patched 3 was born. The die was placed back in service (O.101a) and later mated to a new reverse (O.102), giving us two die marriages. This example is one of the prettiest I have come across with its rose and amber central toning and blue rims with a touch of brick red. Full luster and clean surfaces give it strikingly strong eye appeal.

1823 50C Patched 3 MS62 PCGS #6133

O.101a, R1. At some point Mint officials chose to touch up the WD that had been producing broken 3 varieties. The results would turn out less than graceful. The softened die was struck with a short blunt punch to impart a connection to the separated 3 pieces and the patched 3 was born. The die was placed back in service (O.101a) and later mated to a new reverse (O.102), giving us two die marriages. This example is one of the prettiest I have come across with its rose and amber central toning and blue rims with a touch of brick red. Full luster and clean surfaces give it strikingly strong eye appeal.

1823/2 1C VG8BN PCGS #1630

N1, R2-

1823/2 1C VG8BN PCGS #1630

N1, R2-

1823/2 1C VF30BN PCGS #1630

N1, R2.

1823/2 1C VF30BN PCGS #1630

N1, R2.

1824 1C XF40BN PCGS #1636

N3, R2. Cracked for Dansco

1824 1C XF40BN PCGS #1636

N3, R2. Cracked for Dansco

1824 50C AU53 PCGS #39634

O.113, R1. NGC cert# 3808760-018. Early die state as evidenced by the crossbar in the date's 2. A very pretty look with dusty pastels of rose and coral giving way to blue/teal borders at the rim.

1824 50C AU53 PCGS #39634

O.113, R1. NGC cert# 3808760-018. Early die state as evidenced by the crossbar in the date's 2. A very pretty look with dusty pastels of rose and coral giving way to blue/teal borders at the rim.

1824 50C AU53 PCGS #39634

O.113, R1. NGC cert# 3808760-018. Early die state as evidenced by the crossbar in the date's 2. A very pretty look with dusty pastels of rose and coral giving way to blue/teal borders at the rim.

1824 50C AU53 PCGS #6137

O.111, R2. CAC.

1824 50C AU53 PCGS #6137

O.111, R2. CAC.

1824 50C AU55 PCGS #6137

O.107, R2.

1824 50C AU55 PCGS #6137

O.107, R2.

1824 50C AU55 PCGS #39630

O.108a, R2.

1824 50C AU55 PCGS #39630

O.108a, R2.

1824 50C AU55 PCGS #39625

O.105, R3. NGC cert# 4239650-006

1824 50C AU55 PCGS #39625

O.105, R3. NGC cert# 4239650-006

1824 50C AU58 PCGS #6137

O.112a, R4. Perfect grey dirt. Untouched and unspoiled. Ex-Paul Manheim.

1824 50C AU58 PCGS #6137

O.112a, R4. Perfect grey dirt. Untouched and unspoiled. Ex-Paul Manheim.

1824 50C AU58 PCGS #6137

O.104, R2. CAC.

1824 50C AU58 PCGS #6137

O.104, R2. CAC.

1824 50C Over Various Dates AU58 PCGS #6138

O.103, R1. ex-CAC PCGS cert# 12023321. The 1824/2/0, otherwise known as over various, is the most bizarre overdate in the CBH series. The WD was overstruck multiple times and maintenance to remove traces of the wrong numerals seems to have been slipshod. But whatever the cause and whatever the numerals, one thing is certain: the obverse strike is poor due to the shallow design and excessive lapping. Stars are always large and flat. High points on the obverse wore very quickly. Grading, therefore, can be a little tricky as there is almost always a full grade difference in appearance, front and back.

1824 50C Over Various Dates AU58 PCGS #6138

O.103, R1. ex-CAC PCGS cert# 12023321. The 1824/2/0, otherwise known as over various, is the most bizarre overdate in the CBH series. The WD was overstruck multiple times and maintenance to remove traces of the wrong numerals seems to have been slipshod. But whatever the cause and whatever the numerals, one thing is certain: the obverse strike is poor due to the shallow design and excessive lapping. Stars are always large and flat. High points on the obverse wore very quickly. Grading, therefore, can be a little tricky as there is almost always a full grade difference in appearance, front and back.

1824 50C AU58 PCGS #6137

O.115, R2. ex-CAC. A splendid type coin with exceptionally strong album toning front and back. The die chip in the field, left of eagle's wing along with a smaller dot inside C, near bottom are helpful attributing marks. Sold at Jan 2011 FUN, Heritage auction, lot# 10774, for $1840.

1824 50C AU58 PCGS #6137

O.115, R2. ex-CAC. A splendid type coin with exceptionally strong album toning front and back. The die chip in the field, left of eagle's wing along with a smaller dot inside C, near bottom are helpful attributing marks. Sold at Jan 2011 FUN, Heritage auction, lot# 10774, for $1840.

1824 50C AU58+ PCGS #6137

O.116, R3.

1824 50C AU58+ PCGS #6137

O.116, R3.

1824 50C MS63 PCGS #6137

O.117, R1. Ex-Davignon. Catalog description: Another magnificent 1824. This example features electric sea-green toning in the centers, with a halo of pale gold through the stars and legend. Minor striking weaknesses in the lowest drapery lines and a portion of the motto are trifling criticisms. Picked up at the Nov. 2007 Baltimore Show.

1824 50C MS63 PCGS #6137

O.117, R1. Ex-Davignon. Catalog description: Another magnificent 1824. This example features electric sea-green toning in the centers, with a halo of pale gold through the stars and legend. Minor striking weaknesses in the lowest drapery lines and a portion of the motto are trifling criticisms. Picked up at the Nov. 2007 Baltimore Show.

1824 50C MS65+ PCGS #6137

O.105, R2. CAC.

1824 50C MS65+ PCGS #6137

O.105, R2. CAC.

1824/1 50C VF30 PCGS #39642

O.102, R5+. CAC. Cataloger's description: Last offered as a raw VF in 2007: MB 33, lot 140 @ $2,251. There described -- Here is another often abused issue. Why is it that so many 24-102s are both low grade and damaged? This is a lovely exception. The surfaces are smooth and the toning both natural and attractive. We can do nothing about the worn dies. This is a pearl for the collector who cannot afford gems but wants his rarities without problems.

1824/1 50C VF30 PCGS #39642

O.102, R5+. CAC. Cataloger's description: Last offered as a raw VF in 2007: MB 33, lot 140 @ $2,251. There described -- Here is another often abused issue. Why is it that so many 24-102s are both low grade and damaged? This is a lovely exception. The surfaces are smooth and the toning both natural and attractive. We can do nothing about the worn dies. This is a pearl for the collector who cannot afford gems but wants his rarities without problems.

1824/1 50C AU58 PCGS #6139

O.101, R2. A somewhat scarce overdate, struck by a tired and lapped WD, produced halves with a mushy obverse and a generally strong reverse. Liberty's clasp is often absent entirely and central hair detail is always weak. 1824 had more than its share of problems, all to be faced by newly hired Chief Mint Engraver, William Kneass.

1824/1 50C AU58 PCGS #6139

O.101, R2. A somewhat scarce overdate, struck by a tired and lapped WD, produced halves with a mushy obverse and a generally strong reverse. Liberty's clasp is often absent entirely and central hair detail is always weak. 1824 had more than its share of problems, all to be faced by newly hired Chief Mint Engraver, William Kneass.

1824/4 50C AU58 PCGS #6140

O.109, R2. Not truly an overdate as it is really a RPD (or re-engraved...the numeral 4 was usually hand sculpted). It is a Redbook and registry variety nonetheless.

1824/4 50C AU58 PCGS #6140

O.109, R2. Not truly an overdate as it is really a RPD (or re-engraved...the numeral 4 was usually hand sculpted). It is a Redbook and registry variety nonetheless.

1824/4 50C AU58 PCGS #6140

O.110, R2.

1824/4 50C AU58 PCGS #6140

O.110, R2.

1825 1C F12BN PCGS #36799

N7, R3. RPD on 5. F12+

1825 1C F12BN PCGS #36799

N7, R3. RPD on 5. F12+

1825 50C XF40 PCGS #39656

O.109, R5. Crossed NGC cert# 3430413-007 XF40

1825 50C XF40 PCGS #39656

O.109, R5. Crossed NGC cert# 3430413-007 XF40

1825 1C XF40BN PCGS #36796

N6, R3.

1825 1C XF40BN PCGS #36796

N6, R3.

1825 50C AU50 PCGS #6142

O.101, R1. OGH.

1825 50C AU50 PCGS #6142

O.101, R1. OGH.

1825 50C AU53 PCGS #6142

O.113, R1. ex-Charles DeOlden

1825 50C AU53 PCGS #6142

O.113, R1. ex-Charles DeOlden

1825 50C AU55 PCGS #6142

O.107, R2. Was AU53 rattler.

1825 50C AU55 PCGS #6142

O.107, R2. Was AU53 rattler.

1825 50C AU55 PCGS #6142

O.111, R1. ex-CAC as an AU50.