Regulated's Coin Album

1889 5 Gram T.D.Fuego KM-Tn6 MS63 PCGS #151585

One of two or three known examples. Julius Popper was a Romanian-born adventurer who traveled to Argentina during the gold rush of the 1880s. He put together a band of mercenaries, called "Lavaderos del Oro del Sud" (Goldwashers of the South), and traveled to Tierra del Fuego, where he discovered gold. While camped at el Paramo, Popper struck one and five-gram gold coins from crudely made dies. These pieces are incredibly rare today, with only a handful known of each denomination. The present piece was struck on a very crude planchet, probably fashioned out of a placer nugget, this unrefined gold contains a fair amount of silver, which has toned dramatically in shades of blue, green and magenta. Essentially as made. Ex-Eliasberg.

1753-Mo M 2 R Calico-294 MS65 PCGS #670041

Probably the single finest Pillar 2-Reales known.

1652 6Pence Oak Tree AU55 PCGS #19

ex-Wurtzbach/Reed Hawn. Overstruck on a cut down Oak Tree Shilling, with some of the tree visible as undertype. Very nicely centered, with absolutely full legends. An exceptional amount of luster for the grade,

1652 6Pence Pine Tree MS65 PCGS #22

Noe-33. Wildly better than any other Pine Tree Sixpence. Off-center on the obverse, but better than most of the variety, perfectly-centered reverse with full legends. Highly lustrous with no visible marks or hairlines and subtle, attractive lilac and russet toning. I am still attempting to track down the provenance of this piece, although it doesn't appear in any well-known collections.

1652 Shilling Pine Tree, Small Planchet MS64 PCGS #24

Finest Known Small Planchet Pine Tree Shilling of any variety. While Small Planchet Pines are plentiful, there are well under ten known examples in mint state. I have owned both MS64s, and this is the example that I kept for my collection.

1842 1C PR66RB PCGS #1956

An exceptional early proof Large Cent that I purchased housed within a collector's box made for early 20th Century dentist and collector, Dr. French. Virtually as made, with plenty of red and beautiful oil-slick toning.

1854 1C PR66RB PCGS #1992

The single finest 1854 proof Large Cent. Boasts an incredible amount of red.

1846 10C PR65 PCGS #4733

The 1846 dime has long been considered a rarity in any format, with a mintage of 31,000 pieces, ten of which are believed to have been struck as proofs. This is the single finest of the lot.

1846 50C Medium Date PR65 PCGS #6390

Tied finest. An exceptionally original example of this rare early proof that was first discovered around ten years ago.

1803/2 $5 XF45 PCGS #8084

Unique. Probably the single most dramatic error on an early U.S. gold coin. The present piece was in Art Kagin's collection before being sold to the great error specialist Henry Hilgard. Completely original and dripping with luster.

1942 1C J-2081 High Relief SP65 PCGS #12219

High Relief Lincoln Cent - One of two known white-metal 1942 experimental Lincoln Cents struck from an obverse die that measures 20% higher relief than the regular issue examples. Mint records suggest that these pieces were part of the process that eventually produced the "WAR SERIES" experimental dies. This is among the very last true patterns available to collectors.

1662 2Pence Oak Tree, Small 2 MS62 PCGS #45355

Ex-Crosby. Virtually complete on both sides, with exceptional color, surfaces and strike.

1652 3Pence Oak Tree, With IN on Obv MS62 PCGS #45358

The finest of its type, and the second finest Oak Tree Threepence known. Virtually complete legends with attractive color and real frosty luster. The Threepence is the toughest Oak Tree coin to acquire in any grade, and is essentially uncollectible in BU.

1652 Shilling Oak Tree, Spiny Tree MS62 PCGS #45364

Finest Known Spiny Tree Shilling (Noe-14) ex-George Earle and F.C.C. Boyd. An exceptional example with intensely colorful toning.

1652 3Pence Pine Tree, No Pellets MS62 PCGS #45366

ex-Garrett. The Pine Tree Threepence is a tough coin in any grade. This example is one of the two finest seen of any variety, and has plenty of luster and virtually full legends.

1652 Shilling Pine Tree, Large Planchet, No Pellets MS62 PCGS #45370

Noe-2, the Straight Tree. The second finest Straight Tree seen. The present specimen has a lot of frost and has toned around the periphery.

1892-CC $5 Saddle Ridge Hoard MS63 PCGS #108380

The only dramatic toner in the Saddle Ridge Hoard, and one of only a handful of Carson City coins in the group. Exceptionally clean for the assigned grade and super cool...

(1841-60)-O DT$10 Private Restrike Tin Splasher MS63 PCGS #509103

Unique. Now understood to be a Mint product and not a private restrike. One of the few pattern coins known with a mint mark. Probably made around 1840/1841 to test the mintmark's new location on the reverse.

1787 Fugio 1C AM CONG, Cu Hub Impress. MS62BN PCGS #512720

Unique. Discovered in the mid-19th century, this is the earliest pattern for a circulating U.S. coin. The obverse tests the hub used to create the Fugio obverse die, while the reverse is a test of the hub used to make the die for the rare American Congress pattern, which was the original reverse design for the Fugio, and was probably abandoned because of its complexity. An exceptionally important piece of Americana that is unknown to most collectors.

1849 DT$20 Cincinnati Mining & Trd Reverse Die Trial MS64BN PCGS #539890

Unique. Cincinnati Mining & Trading Company is one of the great rarities of the entire Pioneer Gold series, with only THREE examples in private hands of any of the gold issues. The present example is unique as a uniface reverse die trial, and the finest of the three known $20 patterns. Essentially as made, with hints of red and copious die polish.

(1797) Medal Baker-71 Silver, J-PR-1 Sansom Medal-1807 Original SP62 PCGS #546537

Struck in early 1807, but dated 1797. Only a handful of original silver specimens remain of this important medal struck at the early U.S. Mint for jeweler Joseph Sansom. An example of this medal was presented to Thomas Jefferson, prompting him to press the mint to hire its engraver, John Reich, who would go on to design the Classic Head and Capped Bust coinage.

(1869) Medal J-PR-38 Bronze Abraham Lincoln SP66BN PCGS #625964

An original example of Paquet's "Broken Column" Lincoln Funeral Medalet, from dies cut in 1865. This one is about as nice as I've seen.

(c.1850) Token Miller Pa-478 Silvered Brass Sleeper & Fenner MS65 PCGS #625965

Loads of bright silvering left. It almost makes me want a parasol.

(1860) Token Miller NY-475 Brass Loder & Co. MS65 PCGS #625966

Probably 1850s, not 1860s. These occasionally come in Gem.

1910 DT1C J-A1910-1 Uniface Die Trial MS65BN PCGS #806734

Unique. A uniface Lincoln Cent die trial from 1910. One of very few Lincoln Cent patterns available to collectors.

1910 DT1C J-A1910-1 Uniface Die Trial MS65BN PCGS #806734

Unique. A uniface Lincoln Cent die trial from 1910. One of very few Lincoln Cent patterns available to collectors.

(c. 1584) Token Raleigh Plantation Betts-15, Thick Flan XF40 PCGS #827684

(c. 1584) The single finest Raleigh Plantations Token of either variety, boasting fresh, uncorroded surfaces, and a much better strike than is usually found on one of these. The design is one of my favorites, with a putti reclining on a stylized human skull, and bears a great legend: AS SOONE AS WEE TO BEE BEGVNNE, WE DID BEGINNE TO BE VNDONE. Enjoy the anomalous Elizabethan spelling...

1886-S $10 Saddle Ridge Hoard MS64PL PCGS #861050

The only fully prooflike coin in the entire Saddle Ridge Hoard. Exceptionally well-struck and choice for the grade.

(1849-50) $10 Brunk P-490 H.H. Pierson on 1852/1 Humbert VF25 PCGS #861100

Unique. An 1852/1 Humbert $10 counterstamped by H.H. Pierson and W.W. Light in Sacramento during the California gold rush. W.W. Light was a dentist, who also engraved dies for J.S. Ormsby's private gold coinage.

*1889* Gramo CJ-3.2.1 MS64 PCGS #242711

One of perhaps two known examples. Julius Popper was a Romanian-born adventurer who traveled to Argentina during the gold rush of the 1880s. He put together a band of mercenaries, called "Lavaderos del Oro del Sud" (Goldwashers of the South), and traveled to Tierra del Fuego, where he discovered gold. While camped at el Paramo, Popper struck one and five-gram gold coins from crudely made dies. These pieces are incredibly rare today, with only a handful known of each denomination. The present piece is lustrous and devoid of marks, it is struck in placer gold which contains traces of silver, and has developed subtle but attractive peripheral toning.