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1834 1/2C MS65BN PCGS #1165

CAC. A decent light glossy luster shows off beautiful even chocolate brown color.

1852 3CS MS65 PCGS #3666

CAC. A strong luster shows off the surfaces and a gorgeous crescent of reddish gold/gold/green/navy colors-mostly on the obverse. All of the details are sharply struck. The eye appeal is fantastic!

1880 5C PR67+ CAM PCGS #83835

3/1 (12/15)

1837 10C No Stars, Large Date MS65 PCGS #4561

CAC.The austere elegance of Christian Gobrecht's No Stars dime design--Liberty seated against a plain background on the obverse with date below, the reverse with UNITED STATES OF AMERICA around a simple wreath with ONE / DIME inside--makes it one of the simplest but also one of the most classically beautiful 19th century coinage designs. This lustrous, softly frosted Gem offers great eye appeal thanks to broad strokes of blue, violet, green, gold, and orange patina that leave only a few windows of original silver. Population: 25 in 65, 7 finer (11/10)

1917 25C Type 1 MS67FH PCGS #5707

CAC. Light gold toning, a needle-sharp strike, and dynamic cartwheel luster confirm the high grade of this exceptional Type One quarter. Nearly devoid of marks, and practically unobtainable any finer. Population: 60 in 67 Full Head, 2 finer (3/12).

1874 50C Arrows PR64CAM PCGS #86435

CAC. Razor-sharp definition is apparent on all design elements, and the frosty devices contrast boldly with the deeply mirrored fields. The surfaces are virtually pristine and display attractive champagne-gold and cobalt-blue toning, with the color strongest on the reverse rims. Population: 17 in 64 Cameo, 1 finer (9/11).

1941-S 50C MS66 PCGS #6613

(was CAC, regraded and came back 'non CAC'). A full booming intense luster beams nothing but snow white color from both sides. Miss Liberty and the details are exceptionally struck. The eye appeal is totally terrific!

1810 $5 Large Date, Large 5 MS63+ PCGS #8108

CAC. Purchased as MS63/CAC. State c/b. Die clashing is seen most notably at the top of the obverse above the cap. This common early gold type coin has an estimated survival of 500 to 750 pieces, out of an a total of 75,000 to 90,000 originally minted. Of course, the vast majority of those produced were melted from the date of issue through 1834, at which time gold coins became worth less than their intrinsic value. This is a lovely orange-gold example whose color is only interrupted by a spot of copper (from improper mixture of the gold/copper alloy in that area) over the eagle's eye. The devices are sharply struck throughout, and there are no obvious or detracting abrasions. (Upgrade from MS63) EX: Oliver Collection PCGS 1/35 (05/15)

1882 $10 MS64 PCGS #8695

CAC. Philadelphia Mint gold eagle production reached new heights in the early 1880s. In 1882 the total mintage was more than 2.3 million coins. However, Choice or Gem Mint State examples are conditionally rare. This piece has brilliant and highly lustrous orange-gold surfaces with full mint frost. Population: 31 in 64, 1 finer (10/09).

1857-S $20 MS66 PCGS #70000

CAC. Spiked Shield, Variety 20A. Ex: S.S. Central America. SSCA 2796. The Central America went from being an almost-forgotten maritime disaster to an oft-told treasure tale after the discovery of the wreck -- and the golden cargo within. This Premium Gem 1857-S double eagle was one of thousands packed tightly together on the ship and bound for New York with who-knows-what eventual fate when a hurricane sank the Central America. After more than a century and a quarter, this coin and its fellows changed collector understanding of the 1857-S double eagle forever. Despite being packed for shipping, riding through two rough oceans, sinking in a hurricane, and being raised from the ocean floor, this Premium Gem has come through hardly the worse for events (and obviously with no wear). Canary-gold luster, bright and pale, deepens slightly toward the rims. A tiny mark along Liberty's chin is well within the bounds of the grade. Offered alone (no box or paperwork), but this coin and its gold-insert holder carry their own credentials. From The Richard P. Ariagno, M.D. Collection

1908 $20 No Motto MS66 PCGS #99142

CAC. Short Rays obverse. Part of a remarkable hoard of No Motto 1908 double eagles that was set aside until late 1999, when the coins were certified by PCGS and successfully marketed. This butter-gold Premium Gem is splendidly preserved and has pleasing eye appeal, as usual for the Wells Fargo pedigree.