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PCGS Recognizes and Discovers New Chinese Varieties

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As the world’s leading third-party grading company, PCGS receives a large number of coins for authentication and certification. It is the responsibility of the staff of PCGS to identify and examine each coin submitted for grading, and PCGS has a strict protocol of due diligence for carrying out its responsibility. As a result, it sometimes finds varieties previously unpublished and unrecognized. Being a world leader in grading and authenticating numismatic collectibles means adding such pieces, when possible, to the description of the label and serving the hobby and market. Recently, a number of previously undocumented and unrecognized varieties have been added to the already huge database of varieties PCGS recognizes, and in doing so we want to report and broadcast these additions as listed below.

China Empire (1908) $1 L&M-11 Y-14 with Doubled Die Obverse

A sharp-eyed grader in the PCGS Shanghai office recently made this discovery. The (1908) Empire dollars had no major or sub varieties recognized by PCGS other than a center dot on the reverse (character side). Over 4,200 examples of the (1908) Empire dollars have been graded numerically by PCGS and many more details graded. This is the first such instance on this coin, that PCGS has found with a significant variety difference. The coin shows a strong doubled die on the obverse (dragon side) on the lettering and dragon. The most evident doubling is seen on “TI – KUO – SILVE” as well as on the dragon’s tail and claw. This new variety will be recognized automatically by PCGS with spec number 808417.

Obverse and Reverse of (1908) $1 L&M-11 Y-14 Doubled Die Obverse. Click image to enlarge.

Closeups. Click images to enlarge.

China Empire (1911) $1 L&M-37 Y-31 Extra Flame Variety with a Triple Die Obverse

The Empire (1911) dollars already have several recognized and published varieties in coin books and by PCGS. However, a recently discovered new tripled die obverse (dragon side) has been found and recognized by PCGS. This new TDO has tripling evident on “ONE DOLLAR” showing multiple notices, as well as doubling on the dragon’s scales, claw, fireball flame, and the center characters. A much more significant doubled die is already recognized by PCGS, but this tripled die makes another significant variety and will be recognized automatically by PCGS with spec number 768125.

Obverse and Reverse of (1911) $1 L&M-37 Extra Flame Variety Tripe Die Obverse. Click image to enlarge.

Closeups. Click images to enlarge.

China Republic (1921) $1 L&M-79 Patch of 1921 Variety with Double Die Obverse

The Yuan Shih-kai or “fat man” dollar series has a plethora of varieties and more keep getting discovered and published. Recently a new addition was made to the already over 20 varieties recognized for 1921 dollars. This piece had a significant doubled die obverse on the Chinese characters. The variety is also that of the patch of 1921 variety. This new variety will be recognized automatically in tiers above economy or when the additional variety service is requested with spec number 809466.

Obverse and Reverse of (1921) $1 L&M-79 Patch of 1921 Variety Doubled Die Obverse. Click image to enlarge.

Closeup. Click image to enlarge.

China Kwangtung (1890 – 1908) Cash Y-190 with Doubled Die Obverse

PCGS has certified over 700 Kwangtung (1890-1908) Y-190 cash coins with this being the first Doubled Die noticed and attributed. The doubled die on the bottom character on the obverse with lesser doubling on the middle side characters. This new variety will be recognized automatically in tiers above economy or when the additional variety service is requested with spec number 809210.

Obverse and Reverse of 1890-1908 Cash Y-190 Doubled Die Obverse. Click image to enlarge.

Closeups. Click images to enlarge.

China Tibet (Chengdu Mint) (1902 – 1911) Rupee L&M-360 Y-3 with Doubled Die Obverse

The Tibet Rupees made by the Chengdu mint in Szechuan Province have become a very popular coin as witnessed by a new book on sub varieties coming out recently in China. Yet a huge doubled die surprised the grading staff when recently submitted in China. Substantial doubling can be seen on the ear, eye, nose, lips, chin, cap, and dress of the obverse. This is the first significant doubled die for the Tibetan rupee series PCGS have seen. This new variety will be recognized automatically in tiers above economy or when the additional variety service is requested with spec number 809097.

Obverse and Reverse of (1902-1911) Rupee L&M-360 Y-3 Doubled Die Obverse. Click image to enlarge.

Closeup. Click image to enlarge.

China Republic (1933) $1 L&M-109 with Reverse of 1934 WS-0145B

This variety has long been known and information about it published but had been unattributed until now. Listed in Illustrated Catalogue of Chinese Gold & Silver Coins 1791-1949 as WS-145B, the variety features the reverse design used for the next year – 1934 on a 1933-dated obverse. The significant differences can be most noticed on the Junk ship with differences in the sail lines and anchor placement. This new variety will be recognized automatically in tiers above Economy or when the additional variety service is requested with spec number 809626.

Image courtesy of PCGS TrueView. Click image to enlarge.

Reverse of 1933 and Reverse of 1934. Click image to enlarge.

PCGS constantly adds new coins and varieties to its ever-growing database. The goal is to recognize significant, market-recognized varieties in order to accommodate collectors and dealers around the world. This is just one of the many reasons PCGS is the world leader in third-party certification.

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