Silver Dollars & Trade Dollars of the United States - A Complete Encyclopedia

Commemorative Dollar Listings
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(7) Proof silver dollar sets consisted of a pair of 1983-S and 1984-S Proof dollars offered at $48 from October 15, 1982, through January 25, 1983, and for $58 from January 26, 1983, to June 5, 1983. 386,609 were sold. Coins in plastic capsules were housed in a maroon velvet presentation case with a hinged lid on which was mounted a plaque of a heraldic eagle.

(11) 1984-P individual Uncirculated silver dollar coins, $28 each. Each coin was mounted in a plastic capsule set on a gray felt lined tray housed in a blue cardboard box imprinted with the Great Seal and "United States of America Silver Dollar."

(12) 1984-S individual silver dollar.

(13) 1984 Uncirculated dollar sets consisted of one silver dollar from each of the Philadelphia, Denver, and San Francisco mints for $89 (later, $100). Coins in plastic capsules were housed in a gray flannel display tray bearing a plaque of a heraldic eagle. Thecoins, tray, and descriptive certificates were contained in a blue box with a lid imprinted with the Great Seal and "United States of America Silver Dollars."

(14) 1984-S Prestige Proof sets consisted of a 1984-S Proof dollar added to a regular Proof set containing coins from the Lincoln cent through the half dollar and were sold for $59 beginning in March 1984. Each set was mounted in a maroon plastic case hinged between two leatherette covers with "1984" imprinted in silver on a book-type binding with a plaque of a heraldic eagle mounted on the front cover; the case was contained in a maroon cardboard box.

Proof coins, marketed at $32 (later, $35) each, first available at the 1984 Florida United Numismatists Convention January 4-7, 1984. Each coin was mounted in a plastic capsule set on a maroon velvet tray in a small maroon velvet presentation case with a hinged lid, the latter having a heraldic eagle plaque mounted on it. The case was housed in a cardboard box with a white bottom and maroon top, the top imprinted with the Great Seal and "United States of America Silver Dollar."

Final distribution figures for the 1984 Olympic Games silver dollars are as follows: 1984-P 217,954 Uncirculated; 1984-D 116,675 Uncirculated; 1984-S 116,675 Uncirculated and 1,801,210 Proof.

Never before in the history of American commemoratives had such a variety of options been offered. Almost $74 million wasraised in surcharges "to support our Olympic effort and training facilities through the sale of 5 million gold and silver coins," according to aTreasury release. "The Olympic program was the first for which the Mint used aggressive marketing strategies to increase visibility, distribution and sales."

Representative Frank Annunzio later investigated the use of these funds and accused the United States Olympic Organizing Committee of sequestering nearly $42.5 million of the profits of the coinage. An audit by the Government Accounting Office revealed that of the $49.2 million given to the U.S.O.O.C., only a small fraction amounting to just $6.4 million was used to train athletes, $338,000 went overseas for "royalties and coin sales," and the balance, representing the bulk of the profits, was put in interest-bearing investments, certainly not the intent of the original legislation.

An Interesting Sidelight

The 1983-1984 Olympic coin program proved so successful that the U.S, Mint had difficulty preparing enough Proof dies. Consequently, several boxes of dollar dies were shipped from the Philadelphia Mint to the Royal Canadian Mint for polishing and forwarding to the San Francisco Mint One box of reverse dies disappeared from the possession of a public carrier en route to Canada and was never recovered, although one of the dies was later offered to former ANACS authenticator Ingrid Smith, and Successfully returned by her to the U.S.' Secret Service.' For her selfless effort, Smith received some totally unwarranted criticism at the time.

Numismatic Information

Collecting 1984 Olympic Dollars
Today 1984-P, D, and S Olympic commemorative silver dollars are readily available in condition as. issued, with by far the most plentiful variety being the 1984-S Proof.
Today, the 1984 Olympic Games commemorative silver dollars are a necessary part of any commemorative collection of this denomination. The controversysurrounding the headless torsos has notbeen softened by the passage of time, and occasionally in modern times it is still referred to as the least attractive of all commemoratives, perhaps of all legal tender United States coins. However, one cannot have peaks without valleys, and by default the 1984 Olympic Games dollar stands as a low against which highs can be measured. Besides, art is in the eye of the beholder and there are undoubtedly some who consider the coin to be attractive. One thing about m6dern commemoratives is that everyone seems to hive an opinion.

1984 Olympic: Market Values

1984 Olympic: Market Values

1984 Olympic: Summary of Characteristics

1984 Olympic Games Dollar
Commemorating: 1984 Olympic Games in Los Angeles, California.
Obverse motif: Headless figures on pedestal.
Reverse motif: Eagle.
Authorization date: July 22, 1982.
Date on coins: 1984.
Dates when coins were actually minted: 1983-1984.
Mints used: Philadelphia, Denver, San Francisco. Maximum quantity authorized: 50,000,000 (combined 1983 and 1984 silver dollar authorization).
Total quantity minted: Information not released by the Mint.
Quantity melted: Specific information not released by the Mint, but more than 1,170,511 (figure which probably includes coins for two years, dated 1983 and 1984).
Net number distributed: Uncirculated Philadelphia Mint coins: 217,954; Uncirculated Denver Mint coins: 116,675; Uncirculated San Francisco Mint coins: 116,675; Proof San Francisco Mint coins: 1,801,210.
Issued by: U.S. Mint, with certain profits to go to the U.S. Olympic Committee and the Los Angeles
Olympic Organizing Committee. (Retail orders:The United States Mint, 55 Mint Street, San Francisco, CA 94175; wholesale and bulk ordering information: United States Mint, Warner Building, Room 1006, 501 13th Street NW, Washington, D.C. 20220).
Standard original packaging: Various options (see text).
Official sale prices: Uncirculated Philadelphia Mint coins $28 (also as part of Uncirculated P-D-S dollar set at $89, price later raised to $100; also sold as part of other options-see text); Uncirculated Denver Mint coins: (part of Uncirculated P-D-S dollar set at $89, price later raised to $100; also sold as part of other options-see text; not sold singly); Uncirculated San Francisco Mint coins: (part of Uncirculated P-D-S dollar set at $89, price later raised to $100; also sold as part of other options-see text; not sold singly); Proof San Francisco Mint coins $32 (later, $35); sales closed January 18, 1985.
Designer of obverse and reverse: Robert Graham.
Interesting fact: The obverse of this dollar is among the most controversial of all modern commemorative designs.

Commemorative Dollar Listings
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