1932 25C (Regular Strike)

Series: Washington Quarters 1932-1964

PCGS MS67

PCGS MS67

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PCGS MS67

PCGS MS67

PCGS MS67

PCGS MS67

PCGS #:
5790
Designer:
John Flanagan
Edge:
Reeded
Diameter:
24.30 millimeters
Weight:
6.30 grams
Mintage:
5,404,000
Mint:
Philadelphia
Metal:
90% Silver, 10% Copper
Major Varieties

Die Varieties

Current Auctions - PCGS Graded
Current Auctions - NGC Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - PCGS Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - NGC Graded

Rarity and Survival Estimates Learn More

Grades Survival
Estimate
Numismatic
Rarity
Relative Rarity
By Type
Relative Rarity
By Series
All Grades 500,000 R-1.6 19 / 93 TIE 19 / 93 TIE
60 or Better 40,000 R-2.6 42 / 93 TIE 42 / 93 TIE
65 or Better 5,000 R-4.0 15 / 93 TIE 15 / 93 TIE
Survival Estimate
All Grades 500,000
60 or Better 40,000
65 or Better 5,000
Numismatic Rarity
All Grades R-1.6
60 or Better R-2.6
65 or Better R-4.0
Relative Rarity By Type All Specs in this Type
All Grades 19 / 93 TIE
60 or Better 42 / 93 TIE
65 or Better 15 / 93 TIE
Relative Rarity By Series All Specs in this Series
All Grades 19 / 93 TIE
60 or Better 42 / 93 TIE
65 or Better 15 / 93 TIE

Condition Census What Is This?

Pos Grade Image Pedigree and History
1 MS67 PCGS grade MS67 PCGS grade

High Desert Collection (PCGS Set Registry)

1 MS67 PCGS grade MS67 PCGS grade

Wondercoin Collection (PCGS Set Registry)

1 MS67 PCGS grade MS67 PCGS grade
1 MS67 PCGS grade

Wondercoin Collection (PCGS Set Registry)

1 MS67 PCGS grade
1 MS67 PCGS grade
1 MS67 PCGS grade
1 MS67 PCGS grade
1 MS67 PCGS grade
10 MS66+ PCGS grade
MS67 PCGS grade #1 MS67 PCGS grade

High Desert Collection (PCGS Set Registry)

MS67 PCGS grade #1 MS67 PCGS grade

Wondercoin Collection (PCGS Set Registry)

MS67 PCGS grade #1 MS67 PCGS grade
#1 MS67 PCGS grade

Wondercoin Collection (PCGS Set Registry)

#1 MS67 PCGS grade
#1 MS67 PCGS grade
#1 MS67 PCGS grade
#1 MS67 PCGS grade
#1 MS67 PCGS grade
#10 MS66+ PCGS grade
David Hall:

The Washington quarter was first issued to commemorate the 200th anniversary of George Washington's birth. It was the first design change for U.S. coins since 1916. It was some what of a novelty at the time of issue. However, 1932 was the depth of the Great Depression so not a lot of Uncircuated examples were initially saved. The coin was desirable nonetheless and within a few years it was much hoarded. But most of the coins that were saved were sliders, i.e. coins that had seen a little circulation and would grade AU58 or so today. I remember seeing slider rolls of this isssue in the 1970s. True Gem MS65 or better 1932 Philadelphia quarters are actually fairly rare. In MS67 (PCGS population of only two coins as of August, 2009), this is an extremely rare coin.

Ron Guth:

According to a notice in the June 1934 issue of The Numismatist (p. 416), collectors could still purchase Uncirculated 1932 Quarter Dollars directly from the U.S. Treasury for "the face value of the coins and an amount sufficient to cover the mail charrges by first-class mail."