Sommer Is Shilng Large Sails (Regular Strike)

Series: U.S. Colonial Issues

PCGS VF20

PCGS VF20

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PCGS #:
7
Designer:
N/A
Edge:
N/A
Diameter:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Mintage:
N/A
Mint:
N/A
Metal:
Other
Major Varieties

Current Auctions - PCGS Graded
Current Auctions - NGC Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - PCGS Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - NGC Graded

Condition Census What Is This?

Pos Grade Image Pedigree and History
1 XF details, obverse scratches

John G. Murdoch, Esq. Collection - Sotheby, Wilkinson & Hodge 7/1903:546, £17 - Spink - Stack's 5/2007:317, $109,250

2 VF20 PCGS grade
3 VG10 estimated grade

Old New England Collection - Heritage 4/2014:5474, $58,750 - Poulos Family Collection - Heritage 8/2019:3627, $32,400

#1 XF details, obverse scratches

John G. Murdoch, Esq. Collection - Sotheby, Wilkinson & Hodge 7/1903:546, £17 - Spink - Stack's 5/2007:317, $109,250

#2 VF20 PCGS grade
#3 VG10 estimated grade

Old New England Collection - Heritage 4/2014:5474, $58,750 - Poulos Family Collection - Heritage 8/2019:3627, $32,400

Ron Guth:

Sommer Island Shillings were made circa 1616 for use in present-day Bermuda, where many of them have been found by beachcombers, metal detectorists, and treasure hunters. They are known by two different, major varieties: Small Sails and Large Sails. On the Small Sails variety, the foresail is far from the beaded border (hint: the bow of the boat is on the left side of the coin, as is the small foresail); on the Large Sails variety, the foresail is very close to the beaded border). The Large Sails variety is considerably rarer than the Small Sails variety. Only five to six Large Sails examples are known, one of which is housed permanently in the Bermuda Money Museum. Most examples are pitted, corroded, clipped, or otherwise environmentally damaged; none are better than Extremely Fine.