1783 P '100' Nova Plain (Proof)

Series: U.S. Colonial Issues

PCGS #:
45409
Designer:
N/A
Edge:
N/A
Diameter:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Mintage:
N/A
Mint:
Philadelphia
Metal:
N/A
Major Varieties

Current Auctions - PCGS Graded
Current Auctions - NGC Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - PCGS Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - NGC Graded

Rarity and Survival Estimates Learn More

Grades Survival
Estimate
Numismatic
Rarity
Relative Rarity
By Type
Relative Rarity
By Series
All Grades 1 R-10.0 1 / 5 TIE 1 / 5 TIE
60 or Better 1 R-10.0 1 / 5 TIE 1 / 5 TIE
65 or Better 0 R-10.1 1 / 5 1 / 5
Survival Estimate
All Grades 1
60 or Better 1
65 or Better
Numismatic Rarity
All Grades R-10.0
60 or Better R-10.0
65 or Better R-10.1
Relative Rarity By Type All Specs in this Type
All Grades 1 / 5 TIE
60 or Better 1 / 5 TIE
65 or Better 1 / 5
Relative Rarity By Series All Specs in this Series
All Grades 1 / 5 TIE
60 or Better 1 / 5 TIE
65 or Better 1 / 5

Condition Census What Is This?

Pos Grade Image Pedigree and History
1 AU55 estimated grade
Weight: 26.39 grains (per Stack’s 5/1991)
Composition: 93.65% Silver, 6.19% Copper, .16% gold and lead (per Stack’s 5/1991)
Diameter: 
Edge: Plain
 
Benjamin Dudley - Robert Morris - Thomas Jefferson - Charles Thomson - William Taap Collection - T. Chapman and Son 10/1884:131 - John G. Murdoch Collection - Sotheby, Wilkinson and Hodge 7/1903:905 - S.H. Chapman - Robert Garrett Collection - John Work Garrett Collection - Wayte Raymond - Guttag brothers FPL in 1923 - Waldo C. Newcomer Collection, who paid for $3,000 - B.Max Mehl, sold privately in 1931 - "Col." E.H.R. Green Collection - B.G. Johnson, sent on approval to Abe Kosoff (Numismatic Gallery) on 7/16/1945 for $1,250 but returned on 8/3/1945 - Eric P. Newman Collection - Eric P. Newman Numismatic Education Society - Heritage 5/2014:30424, $705,000
#1 AU55 estimated grade
Weight: 26.39 grains (per Stack’s 5/1991)
Composition: 93.65% Silver, 6.19% Copper, .16% gold and lead (per Stack’s 5/1991)
Diameter: 
Edge: Plain
 
Benjamin Dudley - Robert Morris - Thomas Jefferson - Charles Thomson - William Taap Collection - T. Chapman and Son 10/1884:131 - John G. Murdoch Collection - Sotheby, Wilkinson and Hodge 7/1903:905 - S.H. Chapman - Robert Garrett Collection - John Work Garrett Collection - Wayte Raymond - Guttag brothers FPL in 1923 - Waldo C. Newcomer Collection, who paid for $3,000 - B.Max Mehl, sold privately in 1931 - "Col." E.H.R. Green Collection - B.G. Johnson, sent on approval to Abe Kosoff (Numismatic Gallery) on 7/16/1945 for $1,250 but returned on 8/3/1945 - Eric P. Newman Collection - Eric P. Newman Numismatic Education Society - Heritage 5/2014:30424, $705,000
David Hall:

The Nova Constellatio silver "100" pattern with a plain edge is unique.

P. Scott Rubin: The 1783 Plain Edge 100 or “Bit” Nova Constellatio Silver Pattern is a unique coin that is part of the first proposal for a coinage of The United States of America. There are two other 1783 100 coins known to exist. They differ from the present coin and, like the rest of the Nova Constellatio Patterns, they contain an edge design of a twin leaf image. The size of this coin approximates the Dime of the eventual coinage of the United States.

What makes this coin and this denomination of the Nova Constellatio coinage so special is that more than one coin was struck. All the other three denominations known to exist of this Coinage are unique, as only one coin of each appears to have been struck.

This makes the 100 or “Bit” Nova Constellatio the only denomination of the first Pattern Coinage struck for the United States that is collectible. Currently (2016) one complete set of the 1783 Nova Constellatio Coinage (a set of all four known denominations) is owned by one owner and off the market. However, collectors have the potential to own this Bit Nova Constellatio with plain edge and another twin leaf edge if they ever appear for sale.

Condition-wise, the 1783 Plain Edge 100 Nova Constellatio Silver Pattern is the second finest of the three known coins of this denomination. As far as historical importance goes, this coin was part of all the Silver 1783 Nova Constellatio Patterns that documentation proves came from Thomas Jefferson, who turned them over to Charles Thomson (Secretary of the Congress) in 1783. While Thomson kept the two highest denomination coins of the Silver Set, at some point the three 100 denomination coins were given to others and became separated.

This makes the 1783 Plain Edge 100 Nova Constellatio Silver Pattern one of the most historically important coins ever struck for the United States and one of the rarest since it is unique because of its plain edge.