1803 $1 (Proof)

Series: Draped Bust Dollars 1801-1804

Image courtesy of <a href="http://www.bowersandmerena.com" target="_blank">Bowers and Merena Auctions</a>

Image courtesy of Bowers and Merena Auctions

PCGS PR66

PCGS PR66

PCGS #:
6906
Designer:
Robert Scot
Edge:
Lettered: HUNDRED CENTS ONE DOLLAR OR UNIT
Diameter:
40.00 millimeters
Weight:
27.00 grams
Mintage:
10
Mint:
Philadelphia
Metal:
90% Silver, 10% Copper
Major Varieties

Die Varieties

Current Auctions - PCGS Graded
Current Auctions - NGC Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - PCGS Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - NGC Graded

Rarity and Survival Estimates Learn More

Grades Survival
Estimate
Numismatic
Rarity
Relative Rarity
By Type
Relative Rarity
By Series
All Grades 10 R-9.5 4 / 5 TIE 4 / 5 TIE
60 or Better 9 R-9.6 4 / 5 4 / 5
65 or Better 6 R-9.7 3 / 5 TIE 3 / 5 TIE
Survival Estimate
All Grades 10
60 or Better 9
65 or Better 6
Numismatic Rarity
All Grades R-9.5
60 or Better R-9.6
65 or Better R-9.7
Relative Rarity By Type All Specs in this Type
All Grades 4 / 5 TIE
60 or Better 4 / 5
65 or Better 3 / 5 TIE
Relative Rarity By Series All Specs in this Series
All Grades 4 / 5 TIE
60 or Better 4 / 5
65 or Better 3 / 5 TIE

Condition Census What Is This?

Pos Grade Image Pedigree and History
1 PR66 PCGS grade

Possibly Mint Director Henry Richard Linderman - unknown intermediaries - Texas rare coin dealer Robert L. Astrich (purchased over the counter in 1991 - Ed Milas (purchased at the 1991 ANA Convention) - Grand Traverse Heritage Collection - Bowers & Merena 2/2007:429, $672,500 - Greensboro Collection - Heritage 1/2013:5723, $851,875

1 PR66 PCGS grade
3 PR65 PCGS grade
3 PR65 PCGS grade
3 PR65 PCGS grade
3 PR65 estimated grade
3 PR65 estimated grade
8 PR64 estimated grade
8 PR64 estimated grade
#1 PR66 PCGS grade

Possibly Mint Director Henry Richard Linderman - unknown intermediaries - Texas rare coin dealer Robert L. Astrich (purchased over the counter in 1991 - Ed Milas (purchased at the 1991 ANA Convention) - Grand Traverse Heritage Collection - Bowers & Merena 2/2007:429, $672,500 - Greensboro Collection - Heritage 1/2013:5723, $851,875

#1 PR66 PCGS grade
#3 PR65 PCGS grade
#3 PR65 PCGS grade
#3 PR65 PCGS grade
#3 PR65 estimated grade
#3 PR65 estimated grade
#8 PR64 estimated grade
#8 PR64 estimated grade
P. Scott Rubin: The 1803 Proof Silver Dollar is an extremely rare issue with only four specimens reported known. For many years it was believed that ten to twelve specimens of this issue existed. It was not until research done in the 1970’s showed that only three individual specimens could be identified. In the early 1990’s a fourth specimen was reported, so as of now (2014) that is where the population stands.

The 1803 Proof Silver Dollar has been called a restrike, however since there were no 1803 Silver Dollars made in Proof before these coins appeared and because they are struck from dies not made until many years after their date, the term restrike is not correct.

All 1803 Proof Silver Dollars grade as follows: three are graded Proof(66) and one in Proof(65), with PCGS grading two in Proof(66) and NGC grading one in Proof(66) and one in Proof(65). To date the highest price realized is for a PCGS graded Proof(66) specimen sold by Heritage in their 2013 FUN Platinum Night Sale as lot 5723 for $851,875.

The 1803 Proof Silver Dollar is closely related to the 1801 and 1802 and 1804 Proof Silver Dollars. There is no evidence existing that proves when the 1803 Proof Silver Dollar obverse die was made. The reverse die used to strike this coin is the same as the Class I or Original 1804 Silver Dollars, so we know that die was prepared by 1834. We know that the punch used to create the bust on the 1803 coins is the same as used to create the 1804 Dollars.

We know that the 1801 and 1803 Proof Silver dollars were struck at the same time and that they were struck before the 1802 Proof Silver dollars by the condition of the reverse die at the time of striking. What we do not have evidence of is an exact date of striking. It is probable that they were struck around 1858 but some believe they were struck as late as the early 1870’s. Since the first time the numismatic public was made aware of the 1801, 1802 and 1803 Proof Silver Dollars was in 1876 either is possible.