1804 $10 Plain 4 (Proof)

Series: (None)

PCGS PR64

PCGS PR64

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PCGS #:
8570
Designer:
Robert Scot
Edge:
Reeded
Diameter:
33.00 millimeters
Weight:
17.50 grams
Mintage:
6
Mint:
Philadelphia
Metal:
91.7% Gold, 8.3% Copper
Major Varieties

Die Varieties

Current Auctions - PCGS Graded
Current Auctions - NGC Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - PCGS Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - NGC Graded

Rarity and Survival Estimates Learn More

Grades Survival
Estimate
Numismatic
Rarity
Relative Rarity
By Type
Relative Rarity
By Series
All Grades 3 R-9.8 1 / 1 N/A
60 or Better 3 R-9.8 1 / 1 N/A
65 or Better 0 R-10.1 1 / 1 N/A
Survival Estimate
All Grades 3
60 or Better 3
65 or Better
Numismatic Rarity
All Grades R-9.8
60 or Better R-9.8
65 or Better R-10.1
Relative Rarity By Type All Specs in this Type
All Grades 1 / 1
60 or Better 1 / 1
65 or Better 1 / 1
Relative Rarity By Series All Specs in this Series
All Grades N/A
60 or Better N/A
65 or Better N/A

Condition Census What Is This?

Pos Grade Image Pedigree and History
1 PR64+ PCGS grade

Plate coin in David Akers “United States Gold Patterns”

William H. Woodin - Waldo Newcomer - B. Max Mehl - Col. E.H.R. Green - Stack’s - Clifford T. Weihman - Farish Baldenhofer - Stack’s 11/1955:1459 - Stack’s 10/1988:119, $290,000- Albanese Rare Coins - “Foreign businessman” (purchased for a reported $900,000) - Albanese Rare Coins - “James” (purchased for a reported $2,000,000) - Albanese Rare Coins - private collection (purchased in 2007 for a reported $5 million) - Simpson collection (brokered in 2010 by John Albanese and Legend Numismatics)

2 PR64 PCGS grade

Part of the King of Siam Set (the following pedigree information is for the complete set):

U.S. Mint - King Ph'ra Nang Klao (Rama III) of Siam - King Rama III - King Rama IV - Anna Leonowens and her descendants  (unconfirmed) - purchased in 1962 by David Spink and displayed at the 1962 American Numismatic Association in Atlanta, Georgia - Lester Merkin - sold in 1979 to Elvin I. Unterman - loaned to the Smithsonian Institution for display  from 1983 to 1984 - Bowers & Merena 10/1987:2209, unsold - consigned to Stack’s 5/1989 - purchased by The Rarities Group and Continental Rarity Coin Fund I - Superior 5/1990:3364, $3,190,000 - Iraj Sayah and Terry Brand - Superior 1/1993:1196 - Spectrum Numismatics - private collection - sold in 2001 to an anonymous collector via Spectrum Numismatics and Mike’s Coin Chest for a price reported to be in excess of $4.14 million - unknown intermediary - purchased on November 1, 2005 by Steven Contursi of Rare Coin Wholesalers for a reported $8.5 million

3 PR63 PCGS grade

Benjamin Betts (illustrated by him in the August 1869 issue of the American Journal of Numismatics) - Edward Cogan 6/1871:76, $35 - Isaac F. Wood (Curator of the American Numismatic & Antiquarian Society) - Edward Cogan 5/1873:1334, $20 - Lorin G. Parmelee - New York Coin & Stamp 6/1890:814, $31 - Charles Steigerwalt - William H. Woodin - Thomas Elder 3/1911:1200 - John H. Clapp - Louis Eliasberg, Sr. - Bowers & Ruddy 10/1982:660, $33,000 - Harry W. Bass, Jr. - Harry W. Bass, Jr. Foundation (currently on loan to the Money Museum at the American Numismatic Association)
 

#1 PR64+ PCGS grade

Plate coin in David Akers “United States Gold Patterns”

William H. Woodin - Waldo Newcomer - B. Max Mehl - Col. E.H.R. Green - Stack’s - Clifford T. Weihman - Farish Baldenhofer - Stack’s 11/1955:1459 - Stack’s 10/1988:119, $290,000- Albanese Rare Coins - “Foreign businessman” (purchased for a reported $900,000) - Albanese Rare Coins - “James” (purchased for a reported $2,000,000) - Albanese Rare Coins - private collection (purchased in 2007 for a reported $5 million) - Simpson collection (brokered in 2010 by John Albanese and Legend Numismatics)

#2 PR64 PCGS grade

Part of the King of Siam Set (the following pedigree information is for the complete set):

U.S. Mint - King Ph'ra Nang Klao (Rama III) of Siam - King Rama III - King Rama IV - Anna Leonowens and her descendants  (unconfirmed) - purchased in 1962 by David Spink and displayed at the 1962 American Numismatic Association in Atlanta, Georgia - Lester Merkin - sold in 1979 to Elvin I. Unterman - loaned to the Smithsonian Institution for display  from 1983 to 1984 - Bowers & Merena 10/1987:2209, unsold - consigned to Stack’s 5/1989 - purchased by The Rarities Group and Continental Rarity Coin Fund I - Superior 5/1990:3364, $3,190,000 - Iraj Sayah and Terry Brand - Superior 1/1993:1196 - Spectrum Numismatics - private collection - sold in 2001 to an anonymous collector via Spectrum Numismatics and Mike’s Coin Chest for a price reported to be in excess of $4.14 million - unknown intermediary - purchased on November 1, 2005 by Steven Contursi of Rare Coin Wholesalers for a reported $8.5 million

#3 PR63 PCGS grade

Benjamin Betts (illustrated by him in the August 1869 issue of the American Journal of Numismatics) - Edward Cogan 6/1871:76, $35 - Isaac F. Wood (Curator of the American Numismatic & Antiquarian Society) - Edward Cogan 5/1873:1334, $20 - Lorin G. Parmelee - New York Coin & Stamp 6/1890:814, $31 - Charles Steigerwalt - William H. Woodin - Thomas Elder 3/1911:1200 - John H. Clapp - Louis Eliasberg, Sr. - Bowers & Ruddy 10/1982:660, $33,000 - Harry W. Bass, Jr. - Harry W. Bass, Jr. Foundation (currently on loan to the Money Museum at the American Numismatic Association)
 

David Akers (1975/88):

Description: Obverse. Head of Liberty facing right wearing a Liberty cap. There are eight closely spaced stars near the border behind the head and five in front of the face. The date, 1804, is below bust and LIBERTY runs from directly above the head to in front of the face. This is similar to the regular die except that the 4 in the date is plain and the border is beaded. Reverse. Large eagle with outstretched wings and a large shield on its breast. In its left claw is an olive branch and in its right a bundle of arrows. A ribbon inscribed E PLURIBUS UNUM runs across the right wing and neck. Above the eagle's head are 13 stars and clouds. Similar to the regular issue except for the beaded border.

Comments: This piece is not really a pattern, but is actually a restrike, that is, a piece struck later than its date. The story behind it is analogous to that for the so-called "original" 1804 silver dollar since the 1804 eagle with plain 4 in the date was struck for the same purpose, that is for inclusion in diplomatic presentation sets which were to contain examples of all U.S. coins then in circulation. The sets were actually struck in 1834 and 1835 and since the eagle had been discontinued in 1804, as had been the dollar, new dies had to be prepared with the date of the year in which it was last issued, 1804. The workmanship and quality of the pieces struck for the presentation sets reflected the improved technology of 1834 and 1835 and so J-33 is easily distinguishable from the regular issue 1804 eagle, not only by the plain 4 in the date and the beaded border, but the overall quality as well. For the complete story on the 1804 eagle and dollar, I recommend the fascinating book by Eric P. Newman and Kenneth E. Bressett, The Fantastic 1804 Dollar. There are eight known specimens of the "original" or Class 1 1804 dollars, but only four known examples of J-33. Undoubtedly these are the four pieces struck for the King of Siam, the Imam of Muscat, and the Emperors of Cochin-China and Japan. This piece has been offered for sale at auction only twice, in 1911 when Thomas Elder sold the Woodin specimen, and in 1955 at the Baldenhofer sale.

P. Scott Rubin: The 1804 Plain 4 Proof Eagle is rarer and just as historically important as the same date Silver Dollar. The difference between the two related coins is that in the case of the dollar there are three varieties represented by fifteen existing coins, the 1804 Plain 4 Eagle is known by only four coins.

The plus factor of the 1804 Plain 4 Proof Eagle is so much tied to his history and the metal the coin is made of. First it is known that these coins were made for presentation purposes to foreign dignitaries by the United States Government under the instruction of President Andrew Jackson. Only four such presentation sets of coins were made and only two were presented, one to the King of Siam, the other to the Imaum of Muscat.

In the case of the presented coins they found their way to England and then back to the United States, in the case of the two coins intended for but never presented, they somehow wound up in the hands of American collectors. Unlike the 1804 dollars it appears that no more coins were made for American collectors, this may have been because of the gold content of the coins, since there are silver versions known. One of the silver coins sold by Thomas Elder for $72.50 in his April, 1935 Sale has been incorrectly reported to be one of the gold coins.

The 1804 Plain 4 Proof Eagle is almost four times rarer then the much more recognized rarity the 1804 Silver Dollar and has sold for less at auction, yet recent private sales have shown recognition of its value by exceeding that of the last sales of the 1804 Silver Dollars making this one of the most valuable coins in U.S. numismatics.