PCGS: The Standard for the Rare Coin Industry

1829 10C (Proof)

Series: Capped Bust Dimes 1820-1837

PCGS #:
4548
Designer:
John Reich
Edge:
Reeded
Diameter:
18.50 millimeters
Weight:
2.67 grams
Mintage:
12
Mint:
Philadelphia
Metal:
89.2% Silver, 10.8% Copper
Major Varieties

Current Auctions - PCGS Graded
Current Auctions - NGC Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - PCGS Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - NGC Graded

Rarity and Survival Estimates Learn More

Grades Survival
Estimate
Numismatic
Rarity
Relative Rarity
By Type
Relative Rarity
By Series
All Grades 8 R-9.6 7 / 10 TIE 12 / 16 TIE
60 or Better 8 R-9.6 7 / 10 TIE 12 / 16 TIE
65 or Better 3 R-9.8 7 / 10 TIE 12 / 16 TIE
Survival Estimate
All Grades 8
60 or Better 8
65 or Better 3
Numismatic Rarity
All Grades R-9.6
60 or Better R-9.6
65 or Better R-9.8
Relative Rarity By Type All Specs in this Type
All Grades 7 / 10 TIE
60 or Better 7 / 10 TIE
65 or Better 7 / 10 TIE
Relative Rarity By Series All Specs in this Series
All Grades 12 / 16 TIE
60 or Better 12 / 16 TIE
65 or Better 12 / 16 TIE

Condition Census What Is This?

Pos Grade Image Pedigree and History
1 PR66 PCGS grade
2 PR64 estimated grade
3 PR63 PCGS grade
4 PR62 PCGS grade
5 PR62 estimated grade
#1 PR66 PCGS grade
#2 PR64 estimated grade
#3 PR63 PCGS grade
#4 PR62 PCGS grade
#5 PR62 estimated grade
Ron Guth:

Proof 1829 Dimes are exceedingly rare. We know of at least five different examples, with rumors of perhaps one or two more. Eliasberg had two Proof 1829 Dimes, both of which were different die varieties. His JR-7 example sold recently (2015) as a PCGS PR66 for $70,500, almost exactly double what it sold for in 1996.

Many of the listings in the PCGS Auction Price Realized are duplicate offerings, plus there are a couple of appearances where the coin was a questionable Proof (this is especially true for any of the JR-3 variety). In the final analysis, any true Proof 1829 Dime should be recognized as a significant rarity.