1834 $2.50 Classic (Regular Strike)

Series: Classic Head $2 1/2 1834-1839

PCGS MS65+

PCGS MS65+

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PCGS MS65+

PCGS MS65+

PCGS MS65

PCGS MS65

PCGS #:
7692
Designer:
William Kneass
Edge:
Reeded
Diameter:
18.20 millimeters
Weight:
4.18 grams
Mintage:
112,234
Mint:
Philadelphia
Metal:
90% Gold, 10% Copper
Current Auctions - PCGS Graded
Current Auctions - NGC Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - PCGS Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - NGC Graded

Rarity and Survival Estimates Learn More

Grades Survival
Estimate
Numismatic
Rarity
Relative Rarity
By Type
Relative Rarity
By Series
All Grades 1,750 R-4.7 11 / 11 11 / 11
60 or Better 250 R-6.6 11 / 11 11 / 11
65 or Better 15 R-9.3 6 / 11 6 / 11
Survival Estimate
All Grades 1,750
60 or Better 250
65 or Better 15
Numismatic Rarity
All Grades R-4.7
60 or Better R-6.6
65 or Better R-9.3
Relative Rarity By Type All Specs in this Type
All Grades 11 / 11
60 or Better 11 / 11
65 or Better 6 / 11
Relative Rarity By Series All Specs in this Series
All Grades 11 / 11
60 or Better 11 / 11
65 or Better 6 / 11

Condition Census What Is This?

Pos Grade Image Pedigree and History
1 MS66 PCGS grade
2 MS65+ PCGS grade  MS65+ PCGS grade

High Desert Collection (PCGS Set Registry)

2 MS65+ PCGS grade

Oliver Jung Collection - American Numismatic Rarities 7/2004:87 - D. Brent Pogue Collection - Stack's/Bowers & Sotheby's 9/2015:2059, $88,125

4 MS65 PCGS grade

John Albanese - Scott Travers - Stack's 6/2007:1638 - Stack's 10/2008:1152 - Larry Hanks (as agent?) - D. Brent Pogue Collection - Stack's/Bowers & Sotheby's 9/2015:2058, $47,000

4 MS65 PCGS grade
4 MS65 PCGS grade
4 MS65 PCGS grade
4 MS65 estimated grade

Heritage 8/2011:7452, $57,500

9 MS64 PCGS grade
9 MS64 PCGS grade PCGS #7692 (MS)     64
#1 MS66 PCGS grade
 MS65+ PCGS grade #2 MS65+ PCGS grade

High Desert Collection (PCGS Set Registry)

#2 MS65+ PCGS grade

Oliver Jung Collection - American Numismatic Rarities 7/2004:87 - D. Brent Pogue Collection - Stack's/Bowers & Sotheby's 9/2015:2059, $88,125

#4 MS65 PCGS grade

John Albanese - Scott Travers - Stack's 6/2007:1638 - Stack's 10/2008:1152 - Larry Hanks (as agent?) - D. Brent Pogue Collection - Stack's/Bowers & Sotheby's 9/2015:2058, $47,000

#4 MS65 PCGS grade
#4 MS65 PCGS grade
#4 MS65 PCGS grade
#4 MS65 estimated grade

Heritage 8/2011:7452, $57,500

#9 MS64 PCGS grade
PCGS #7692 (MS)     64 #9 MS64 PCGS grade
Ron Guth:

In 1834, Mint officials changed the design on the Quarter Eagles to comply with the new Coinage Act of June 28, 1834, which law reduced the weight of the Quarter Eagles to prevent melting. On the obverse, Liberty no longer wore a cap; rather the design was a copy of that seen on Classic Head Half Cents of 1809-1836 and Large Cents of 1808-1814.

1834 Quarter Eagles are found with two, slightly different obverse designs. The first, called "Small Head" by Water Breen and others, has tight curls that appear in a near-horizontal arrangement at the back of Liberty's head. The second, called "Large Head" or "Booby Head" by Breen, has looser curls with deep indents between the curls. Breen claimed six different reverse varieties of the Large Head alone, but subsequent researchers have identified only four different reverse dies for both types combined (either Breen was mistaken or there are some varieties awaiting re-discovery) and only four different die combinations in total.

Numerous Mint State 1834 Classic Head Quarter Eagles exist, but most are MS61 to MS64. Gems are very rare, and the finest example appears to be a single PCGS MS66.

David Akers (1975/88): There are actually two distinct vareties of 1834 No Motto quarter eagles. The first has a small head and can be distinguished from the large head variety by the fact that it has tight curls at the top of the head and at the back of the head. In particular, the curls at the back of the head form a nearly straight vertical line. On the other hand, the curls on the large head variety are much more pronounced, and there is a distinct break in the curls at the back of the head.

As a date, this is one of the two most common of this type (the 1836 is the other), and a fairly sizable number of choice examples exist, many of them fully proof-like.