1839 $5 (Regular Strike)

Series: Liberty Head $5 1839-1908

PCGS MS64

PCGS MS64

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PCGS MS64

PCGS MS64

PCGS MS63+

PCGS MS63+

PCGS #:
8191
Designer:
Christian Gobrecht
Edge:
Reeded
Diameter:
22.50 millimeters
Weight:
8.36 grams
Mintage:
118,143
Mint:
Philadelphia
Metal:
90% Gold, 10% Copper
Major Varieties

Current Auctions - PCGS Graded
Current Auctions - NGC Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - PCGS Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - NGC Graded

Rarity and Survival Estimates Learn More

Grades Survival
Estimate
Numismatic
Rarity
Relative Rarity
By Type
Relative Rarity
By Series
All Grades 200 R-7.0 61 / 112 TIE 94 / 218 TIE
60 or Better 12 R-9.5 59 / 112 TIE 87 / 218 TIE
65 or Better 0 R-10.1 1 / 112 1 / 218
Survival Estimate
All Grades 200
60 or Better 12
65 or Better
Numismatic Rarity
All Grades R-7.0
60 or Better R-9.5
65 or Better R-10.1
Relative Rarity By Type All Specs in this Type
All Grades 61 / 112 TIE
60 or Better 59 / 112 TIE
65 or Better 1 / 112
Relative Rarity By Series All Specs in this Series
All Grades 94 / 218 TIE
60 or Better 87 / 218 TIE
65 or Better 1 / 218

Condition Census What Is This?

Pos Grade Image Pedigree and History
1 MS64 PCGS grade

Heritage 1/2014:5441, $41,125

1 MS64 PCGS grade
3 MS63 PCGS grade
3 MS63 PCGS grade MS63 PCGS grade
3 MS63 PCGS grade

Heritage 10/2009:1413

3 MS63 PCGS grade
3 MS63 PCGS grade
3 MS63 PCGS grade
3 MS63 estimated grade

National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution

10 MS62 PCGS grade
#1 MS64 PCGS grade

Heritage 1/2014:5441, $41,125

#1 MS64 PCGS grade
#3 MS63 PCGS grade
MS63 PCGS grade #3 MS63 PCGS grade
#3 MS63 PCGS grade

Heritage 10/2009:1413

#3 MS63 PCGS grade
#3 MS63 PCGS grade
#3 MS63 PCGS grade
#3 MS63 estimated grade

National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution

#10 MS62 PCGS grade
David Akers (1975/88): This is the first year of the new type design by Christian Gobrecht. Although not especially rare in lower grades, it is nevertheless much more rare in all grades than any of the Philadelphia Mint coins of the previous type except the 1834 Crosslet 4. High grade specimens, i.e. coins grading AU or Unc., are very rare and choice mint state pieces are virtually unobtainable. By a substantial margin, the finest 1839 I have ever seen was the superb gem Dean Mathey specimen that was sold in the 1973 NASC Sale for a then remarkable $2250. I have omitted any listing for the so-called "1839/8" Half Eagle because in my opinion, there is no such thing. All 1839 Half Eagles have the same raised dot on the neck near the lowest hair curl and I have never seen a convincing example of a legitimate overdate. (The existence of such an overdate is also illogical since there is no other example after the very earliest days of the U.S. Mint where a new, supposedly improved design began life as an overdate. It seems improbable to me that the dies would have been prepared in 1838 for a brand new design and then repunched with a new date before use. Certainly overdates abound in the early days of U.S. coinage but they are decidedly uncommon after the 1820's and with just one exception (the 1796/5 Half Dime) overdates always exist within the same type and never in the first year of a new design.) The head of Liberty on this and the other issues of 1839 is distinctly different from the head on coins dated 1840 and later. The difference is sufficient that the 1839 should be considered a one year only type coin.