1847-C $2.50 (Regular Strike)

Series: Liberty Head $2 1/2 1840-1907

PCGS MS64

PCGS MS64

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PCGS MS64

PCGS MS64

PCGS MS63

PCGS MS63

PCGS #:
7745
Designer:
Christian Gobrecht
Edge:
Reeded
Diameter:
18.00 millimeters
Weight:
4.18 grams
Mintage:
23,226
Mint:
Charlotte
Metal:
90% Gold, 10% Copper
Major Varieties

Current Auctions - PCGS Graded
Current Auctions - NGC Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - PCGS Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - NGC Graded

Rarity and Survival Estimates Learn More

Grades Survival
Estimate
Numismatic
Rarity
Relative Rarity
By Type
Relative Rarity
By Series
All Grades 325 R-6.3 102 / 147 TIE 102 / 147 TIE
60 or Better 25 R-9.0 93 / 147 TIE 93 / 147 TIE
65 or Better 0 R-10.1 1 / 147 1 / 147
Survival Estimate
All Grades 325
60 or Better 25
65 or Better
Numismatic Rarity
All Grades R-6.3
60 or Better R-9.0
65 or Better R-10.1
Relative Rarity By Type All Specs in this Type
All Grades 102 / 147 TIE
60 or Better 93 / 147 TIE
65 or Better 1 / 147
Relative Rarity By Series All Specs in this Series
All Grades 102 / 147 TIE
60 or Better 93 / 147 TIE
65 or Better 1 / 147

Condition Census What Is This?

Pos Grade Image Pedigree and History
1 MS64 PCGS grade

Goldbergs 6/2014:1682, $19,387.50

1 MS64 PCGS grade MS64 PCGS grade
1 MS64 PCGS grade PCGS #7745 (MS)     64
1 MS64 PCGS grade
1 MS64 PCGS grade
1 MS64 PCGS grade
7 MS63 PCGS grade
7 MS63 PCGS grade
7 MS63 PCGS grade
7 MS63 PCGS grade
#1 MS64 PCGS grade

Goldbergs 6/2014:1682, $19,387.50

MS64 PCGS grade #1 MS64 PCGS grade
PCGS #7745 (MS)     64 #1 MS64 PCGS grade
#1 MS64 PCGS grade
#1 MS64 PCGS grade
#1 MS64 PCGS grade
#7 MS63 PCGS grade
#7 MS63 PCGS grade
#7 MS63 PCGS grade
#7 MS63 PCGS grade
Doug Winter: The 1847-C is the most common Charlotte quarter eagle by a fairly substantial margin. It has the highest original mintage figure of any Charlotte quarter eagle but this figure is only a few hundred pieces more than the 1843-C Large Date. The relative availability of this issue, especially in high grades, suggest a small hoard existed at on time.

The 1847-C is...relatively easy to locate in grades up to and including AU55. It is scarce in properly graded AU58 and rare in Uncirculated, although it is far more available in Mint State grades than any other quarter eagle from this mint. There are an estimated half dozen or so known in MS63 and in MS64, but there are no Gems currently accounted for.

STRIKE: This is among the best struck issues of any denomination from this mint. The obverse is very sharply detailed with just a bit of weakness on the curls nearest to the face and the ear of Liberty. The stats are very sharp with most showing completely detailed radial lines within the stars. On the reverse, the right leg of the eagle is usually weak and the inner part of the eagle’s right wing may show some weakness as well. The border is very sharp, especially on the lettering and the denticles.

SURFACES: It is possible to locate an 1847-C that has reasonably clean surfaces. Many however, are liberally abraded with detracting marks seen in the fields. Mint-made striations are sometimes seen in the obverse fields.

LUSTER: The quality of the luster is above average. Higher grade specimens are frosty with a slightly grainy texture.

COLORATION: Original, uncleaned pieces often show pleasing light yellow-gold or medium green-gold coloration. It is not easy to find pieces with natural color as many have been lightened, cleaned or processed during the past few years.

EYE APPEAL: This is one of the few Charlotte quarter eagles that the date collector can expect to find with good eye appeal...There are a number of choice pieces known with sharp strikes, decent surfaces, good luster and nice color. Unfortunately, such coins are becoming harder to find as more and more examples are cleaned.

DIE CHARACTERISTICS: There are some small raised die scratches from the eleventh to the twelfth star and others noted from the twelfth to the thirteenth. Another die scratch can be seen through the MER in AMERICA. Some coins show slight die rust patches around the date and on the reverse, mostly below the wings of the eagle.

DIE VARIETIES: One die variety is known.

Variety 1 (formerly Variety 8-F): The 1 in the date is joined to the bust and it is also close to the denticles. The 7 is joined to the bust but it is far from the denticles. The reverse was first used in 1846. It was extensively lapped in order to remove rust. One rust mark can still be seen below the 1 in the fraction.

Late die state coins show a fine crack from the right wing to the base of the M in AMERICA.
David Akers (1975/88): This is the most common Charlotte Mint quarter eagle, and choice uncirculated examples are occasionally available. Most specimens that I have seen are well struck except for the minor weakness on the eagle's right leg that appears on most early Liberty Head quarter eagles. Not as rare as the supposedly common 1847.