1849 $5 Mormon (Regular Strike)

Series: (None)

PCGS AU58

PCGS AU58

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PCGS AU58

PCGS AU58

PCGS AU58

PCGS AU58

PCGS #:
10262
Designer:
N/A
Edge:
N/A
Diameter:
N/A
Weight:
N/A
Mintage:
N/A
Mint:
Philadelphia
Metal:
Other
Major Varieties

Current Auctions - PCGS Graded
Current Auctions - NGC Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - PCGS Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - NGC Graded

Condition Census What Is This?

Pos Grade Image Pedigree and History
1 MS60 PCGS grade
2 AU58 PCGS grade

Allan Collection

2 AU58 PCGS grade
2 AU58 PCGS grade
2 AU58 PCGS grade
2 AU58 estimated grade

Eric P. Newman Numismatic Education Society - Heritage 11/2014:3474, $58,750

7 AU55 PCGS grade

Ex Jack Klausen

7 AU55 PCGS grade

Riverboat Collection - Heritage 4/2014:5454 (as PCGS AU55 10001882), $76,375

7 AU55 PCGS grade
7 AU55 PCGS grade
#1 MS60 PCGS grade
#2 AU58 PCGS grade

Allan Collection

#2 AU58 PCGS grade
#2 AU58 PCGS grade
#2 AU58 PCGS grade
#2 AU58 estimated grade

Eric P. Newman Numismatic Education Society - Heritage 11/2014:3474, $58,750

#7 AU55 PCGS grade

Ex Jack Klausen

#7 AU55 PCGS grade

Riverboat Collection - Heritage 4/2014:5454 (as PCGS AU55 10001882), $76,375

#7 AU55 PCGS grade
#7 AU55 PCGS grade
Ron Guth:

Varieties: Kagin 2 - Rare Kagin Restrike 3 in Gilt Copper - 3 known Kagin Restrike 3a in Gilt Copper - 1 known

Notes: Breen estimated the mintage of the Mormon $5 gold coins at 5,340 pieces, but this was purely a guess based on an extrapolation of a 1950 figure of $75,000 for all Mormon gold issues struck between 1848 and 1851.

Several AU55 or better examples are known, though they appear on the market infrequently. The best example known to us is the NGC MS61 from the Eric Newman collection.

The obverse abbreviation "G.S.L.C.P.G." stands for "Great Salt Lake City Pure Gold". However, an assay of the various Mormon gold issues performed at the United States Mint in 1850 showed the coins to be underweight and debased. The gold for these coins came not from Salt Lake City, nor anywhere else in Utah, but from the gold fields of California!

The obverse die was later used (Kagin believes in 1898) to create uniface impressions in gilt copper (see Kagin 3).

The reverse die was later used (Kagin believes in 1898) to create uniface impressions in gilt copper (see Kagin 3a).

Sources and/or recommended reading: "Private Gold Coins And Patterns Of The United States" by Donald H. Kagin, PhD

"Walter Breen's Complete Encyclopedia Of U.S. And Colonial Coins" by Walter Breen