PCGS: The Standard for the Rare Coin Industry

1854 3CS (Regular Strike)

Series: Star Three Cent Silvers 1851-1872

PCGS MS68

PCGS MS68

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PCGS MS66+

PCGS MS66+

PCGS MS66+

PCGS MS66+

PCGS #:
3670
Designer:
James Barton Longacre
Edge:
Plain
Diameter:
14.30 millimeters
Weight:
0.75 grams
Mintage:
671,000
Mint:
Philadelphia
Metal:
90% Silver, 10% Copper
Major Varieties

Current Auctions - PCGS Graded
Current Auctions - NGC Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - PCGS Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - NGC Graded

Rarity and Survival Estimates Learn More

Grades Survival
Estimate
Numismatic
Rarity
Relative Rarity
By Type
Relative Rarity
By Series
All Grades 4,000 R-4.2 4 / 5 19 / 25
60 or Better 500 R-6.0 4 / 5 15 / 25 TIE
65 or Better 100 R-8.0 4 / 5 14 / 25 TIE
Survival Estimate
All Grades 4,000
60 or Better 500
65 or Better 100
Numismatic Rarity
All Grades R-4.2
60 or Better R-6.0
65 or Better R-8.0
Relative Rarity By Type All Specs in this Type
All Grades 4 / 5
60 or Better 4 / 5
65 or Better 4 / 5
Relative Rarity By Series All Specs in this Series
All Grades 19 / 25
60 or Better 15 / 25 TIE
65 or Better 14 / 25 TIE

Condition Census What Is This?

Pos Grade Image Pedigree and History
1 MS68 PCGS grade

Legend Numismatics, sold privately in 6/2009 - Eugene H. Gardner Collection - Heritage 6/2014:30113, $64,625 - Simpson Collection

2 MS67 PCGS grade
3 MS66 PCGS grade MS66 PCGS grade
3 MS66 PCGS grade MS66 PCGS grade
3 MS66 PCGS grade
3 MS66 PCGS grade
3 MS66 PCGS grade
3 MS66 PCGS grade
3 MS66 PCGS grade
3 MS66 PCGS grade
#1 MS68 PCGS grade

Legend Numismatics, sold privately in 6/2009 - Eugene H. Gardner Collection - Heritage 6/2014:30113, $64,625 - Simpson Collection

#2 MS67 PCGS grade
MS66 PCGS grade #3 MS66 PCGS grade
MS66 PCGS grade #3 MS66 PCGS grade
#3 MS66 PCGS grade
#3 MS66 PCGS grade
#3 MS66 PCGS grade
#3 MS66 PCGS grade
#3 MS66 PCGS grade
#3 MS66 PCGS grade
Ron Guth:

In 1854, the Mint made a couple of changes to the Three-Cent Silver pieces to comply with the Coinage Act of 1853. First, they increased the percentage of silver in the coin from 75% to 90% to match the other silver coins in circulation. To keep the actual amount of silver the same, the weight of the coin was reduced from .80 grams to .75 grams. The diameter remained the same at 14 millimeters. Two outlines were added around the star (in previous years there were no outlines), presumably to indicate that these changes had been made, just as the arrows and/or rays were added to other silver coins in 1853.

Though this is technically the first year of a new sub-type, collectors seem to have paid little attention back in 1854, as there is no upward skewing of the quality of the surviving population. If anything, there was a decline in the numbe of coins set aside by collectors because the quantity of Mint State survivors is actually lower than it is for 1853.

Fully struck examples are scarce, and clashmarks are seen frequently. The typical Mint State grade is MS-64, but MS-65 examples, while less plentiful, can be found with relative ease. The finest examples certified by PCGS include two at the MS67 level.