PCGS: The Standard for the Rare Coin Industry

1856 1C Flying Eagle (Regular Strike)

Series: Flying Eagle Cents 1856-1858

PCGS MS66

PCGS MS66

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PCGS MS66

PCGS MS66

PCGS MS65

PCGS MS65

PCGS #:
2013
Designer:
James Barton Longacre
Edge:
Plain
Diameter:
19.00 millimeters
Weight:
4.70 grams
Mintage:
634
Mint:
Philadelphia
Metal:
Copper-Nickel
Major Varieties

Die Varieties

Current Auctions - PCGS Graded
Current Auctions - NGC Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - PCGS Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - NGC Graded

Rarity and Survival Estimates Learn More

Grades Survival
Estimate
Numismatic
Rarity
Relative Rarity
By Type
Relative Rarity
By Series
All Grades 550 R-5.9 1 / 5 1 / 5
60 or Better 225 R-6.7 2 / 5 2 / 5
65 or Better 25 R-9.0 2 / 5 2 / 5
Survival Estimate
All Grades 550
60 or Better 225
65 or Better 25
Numismatic Rarity
All Grades R-5.9
60 or Better R-6.7
65 or Better R-9.0
Relative Rarity By Type All Specs in this Type
All Grades 1 / 5
60 or Better 2 / 5
65 or Better 2 / 5
Relative Rarity By Series All Specs in this Series
All Grades 1 / 5
60 or Better 2 / 5
65 or Better 2 / 5

Condition Census What Is This?

Pos Grade Image Pedigree and History
1 MS66 PCGS grade

Joseph P. Gorrell Collection - Heritage 1/2003:4401, $103,500

1 MS66 PCGS grade
3 MS65+ PCGS grade
4 MS65 PCGS grade
4 MS65 PCGS grade
4 MS65 PCGS grade
4 MS65 PCGS grade
4 MS65 PCGS grade
4 MS65 PCGS grade
4 MS65 PCGS grade
#1 MS66 PCGS grade

Joseph P. Gorrell Collection - Heritage 1/2003:4401, $103,500

#1 MS66 PCGS grade
#3 MS65+ PCGS grade
#4 MS65 PCGS grade
#4 MS65 PCGS grade
#4 MS65 PCGS grade
#4 MS65 PCGS grade
#4 MS65 PCGS grade
#4 MS65 PCGS grade
#4 MS65 PCGS grade
Jaime Hernandez:
The 1856 Flying Eagle cent is a very important coin in American history, as it was very instrumental in popularizing coin collecting throughout America in the late 1800’s.
The 1856 Flying Eagle cents were initially struck as presentation pieces and to introduce them to members of Congress and other dignitaries. Records indicate that at least 634 examples were produced for this purpose alone. However, in the ensuing months, it is believed that additional examples were produced at different intervals, so that they can also be presented to additional government dignitaries.
Furthermore, it is believed that other examples of the 1856 Flying eaglree cents were struck for collectors who were aware of the coins and desired one of their own. These examples eventually made it into circulation. Consequently, some refer to all 1856 cents as patterns, since they were struck primarily for presentation purposes. Others, consider some of the 1856 Flying Eagle cents circulation strike coins, since they were produced in large quantities and were eventually released into circulation. Regardless if some of coins are considered circulation strikes or patterns, the coins are historical relics of American history, as, they attracted some of America's first and most dedicated coin collectors.
It is not known exactly how many 1856 cents were produced, but estimates range anywhere from 1,500 to about 2,150 examples. Whatever the exact figure is, one thing is for certain. There has never been enough coins in existence to meet the high demand. One of the clearest indications of the 1856 Flying Eagle cent's popularity, is the prices they command when they do become available. Even in the lowest grades such as Good-4, most examples will command thousands of dollars and even much more when they remain in higher condition.