1868 10C (Regular Strike)

Series: Liberty Seated Dimes 1837-1891

PCGS MS66

PCGS MS66

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PCGS MS66

PCGS MS66

PCGS MS64+

PCGS MS64+

PCGS #:
4647
Designer:
James Barton Longacre
Edge:
Reeded
Diameter:
17.90 millimeters
Weight:
2.48 grams
Mintage:
464,000
Mint:
Philadelphia
Metal:
90% Silver, 10% Copper
Current Auctions - PCGS Graded
Current Auctions - NGC Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - PCGS Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - NGC Graded

Rarity and Survival Estimates Learn More

Grades Survival
Estimate
Numismatic
Rarity
Relative Rarity
By Type
Relative Rarity
By Series
All Grades 300 R-6.4 15 / 67 TIE 24 / 122 TIE
60 or Better 40 R-8.7 19 / 67 TIE 40 / 122 TIE
65 or Better 4 R-9.8 12 / 67 TIE 28 / 122 TIE
Survival Estimate
All Grades 300
60 or Better 40
65 or Better 4
Numismatic Rarity
All Grades R-6.4
60 or Better R-8.7
65 or Better R-9.8
Relative Rarity By Type All Specs in this Type
All Grades 15 / 67 TIE
60 or Better 19 / 67 TIE
65 or Better 12 / 67 TIE
Relative Rarity By Series All Specs in this Series
All Grades 24 / 122 TIE
60 or Better 40 / 122 TIE
65 or Better 28 / 122 TIE

Condition Census What Is This?

Pos Grade Image Pedigree and History
1 MS66 PCGS grade
1 MS66 PCGS grade
2 MS65 PCGS grade
2 MS65 PCGS grade
2 MS65 PCGS grade
2 MS65 PCGS grade
2 MS65 PCGS grade
8 MS64+ PCGS grade
9 MS64 PCGS grade
9 MS64 PCGS grade
#1 MS66 PCGS grade
#1 MS66 PCGS grade
#2 MS65 PCGS grade
#2 MS65 PCGS grade
#2 MS65 PCGS grade
#2 MS65 PCGS grade
#2 MS65 PCGS grade
#8 MS64+ PCGS grade
#9 MS64 PCGS grade
#9 MS64 PCGS grade
Ron Guth:

In 1868, production of Dimes at the Philadelphia Mint reached 464,000 coins, the largest mintage since 1862. In fact, this mintage was larger than the combined mintages of the previous five years. Despite this increased availability, Mint State 1868 Dimes remain elusive. A small number of MS64 examples exist, but Gems in MS65 and better are very difficult to find.

According to Gerry Fortin, an expert on Seated Liberty Dimes, twelve die pairs were used to strike 1868 Dimes. Two of those die pairs were first used to strike Proof coins, then later used to strike coins for circulation. This created lots of confusion as to what is a Proof and what is a circulation strike because the two versions often look very similar. Even Gene Gardner, another person who knew a lot about Seated Liberty coins, was not sure about his own 1868 Dime (he eventually went with the NGC grade of MS65*).