1875 G$1 (Regular Strike)

Series: Liberty Gold Dollars 1849-1889

PCGS MS66+

PCGS MS66+

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PCGS MS66

PCGS MS66

PCGS MS64+

PCGS MS64+

PCGS #:
7576
Designer:
James Barton Longacre
Edge:
Reeded
Diameter:
14.30 millimeters
Weight:
1.70 grams
Mintage:
400
Mint:
Philadelphia
Metal:
90% Gold, 10% Copper
Major Varieties

Current Auctions - PCGS Graded
Current Auctions - NGC Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - PCGS Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - NGC Graded

Rarity and Survival Estimates Learn More

Grades Survival
Estimate
Numismatic
Rarity
Relative Rarity
By Type
Relative Rarity
By Series
All Grades 100 R-8.0 4 / 49 TIE 7 / 81 TIE
60 or Better 60 R-8.4 14 / 49 30 / 81 TIE
65 or Better 10 R-9.5 9 / 49 TIE 18 / 81 TIE
Survival Estimate
All Grades 100
60 or Better 60
65 or Better 10
Numismatic Rarity
All Grades R-8.0
60 or Better R-8.4
65 or Better R-9.5
Relative Rarity By Type All Specs in this Type
All Grades 4 / 49 TIE
60 or Better 14 / 49
65 or Better 9 / 49 TIE
Relative Rarity By Series All Specs in this Series
All Grades 7 / 81 TIE
60 or Better 30 / 81 TIE
65 or Better 18 / 81 TIE

Condition Census What Is This?

Pos Grade Image Pedigree and History
1 MS66+ PCGS grade MS66+ PCGS grade

Longfellow collection - Heritage 2/2010:1427 - Simpson Collection

2 MS66 PCGS grade MS66 PCGS grade

David Akers - Dr. Steven Duckor

2 MS66 PCGS grade
4 MS65 PCGS grade
4 MS65 PCGS grade
4 MS65 PCGS grade
4 MS65 PCGS grade
4 MS65 PCGS grade
4 MS65 PCGS grade
4 MS65 PCGS grade
MS66+ PCGS grade #1 MS66+ PCGS grade

Longfellow collection - Heritage 2/2010:1427 - Simpson Collection

MS66 PCGS grade #2 MS66 PCGS grade

David Akers - Dr. Steven Duckor

#2 MS66 PCGS grade
#4 MS65 PCGS grade
#4 MS65 PCGS grade
#4 MS65 PCGS grade
#4 MS65 PCGS grade
#4 MS65 PCGS grade
#4 MS65 PCGS grade
#4 MS65 PCGS grade
David Akers (1975/88): With a total issue of only 420 pieces, the 1875 has one of the lowest mintages of any regularly issued U.S. gold coin. With so low a mintage, essentially all specimens are "first strikes" and therefore invariably have full proof-like surfaces. This has given rise to the false notion that the 1875 gold dollar is more common in proof than it is in uncirculated condition. Most cataloguers have mistakenly called Uncs. "proofs" over the years. Actually, the Uncs. are readily distinguishable from the proofs because all uncirculated 1875 gold dollars have a small thorn-like projection from the throat into the field. This projection is seen only on the Uncs., not on the proofs, and no matter how much a particular 1875 may look like a proof, if it has the projection from the throat into the field, it is an Unc. Hopefully, auction cataloguers, dealers, and collectors alike will now put the myth of how much rarer an Unc. 1875 is than an 1875 proof to rest once and for all.