1888 $2.50 (Proof)

Series: Liberty Head $2 1/2 1840-1907

ex Trompeter collection

ex Trompeter collection

PCGS #:
7914
Designer:
Christian Gobrecht
Edge:
Reeded
Diameter:
18.00 millimeters
Weight:
4.18 grams
Mintage:
97
Mint:
Philadelphia
Metal:
90% Gold, 10% Copper
Major Varieties

Current Auctions - PCGS Graded
Current Auctions - NGC Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - PCGS Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - NGC Graded

Rarity and Survival Estimates Learn More

Grades Survival
Estimate
Numismatic
Rarity
Relative Rarity
By Type
Relative Rarity
By Series
All Grades 55 R-8.4 42 / 60 TIE 42 / 60 TIE
60 or Better 52 R-8.4 42 / 60 TIE 42 / 60 TIE
65 or Better 15 R-9.3 36 / 60 TIE 36 / 60 TIE
Survival Estimate
All Grades 55
60 or Better 52
65 or Better 15
Numismatic Rarity
All Grades R-8.4
60 or Better R-8.4
65 or Better R-9.3
Relative Rarity By Type All Specs in this Type
All Grades 42 / 60 TIE
60 or Better 42 / 60 TIE
65 or Better 36 / 60 TIE
Relative Rarity By Series All Specs in this Series
All Grades 42 / 60 TIE
60 or Better 42 / 60 TIE
65 or Better 36 / 60 TIE

Condition Census What Is This?

Pos Grade Image Pedigree and History
1 PR66 PCGS grade
2 PR65 PCGS grade
2 PR65 PCGS grade
2 PR65 PCGS grade
5 PR64 PCGS grade
5 PR64 PCGS grade
5 PR64 PCGS grade
5 PR64 PCGS grade
5 PR64 PCGS grade
5 PR64 PCGS grade
#1 PR66 PCGS grade
#2 PR65 PCGS grade
#2 PR65 PCGS grade
#2 PR65 PCGS grade
#5 PR64 PCGS grade
#5 PR64 PCGS grade
#5 PR64 PCGS grade
#5 PR64 PCGS grade
#5 PR64 PCGS grade
#5 PR64 PCGS grade
Ron Guth:

In 1888, the Mint produced 97 Proof Quarter Eagles, which appeared to be the limit of their sales capacity. Times have certainly changed and any coin with a mintage of less than 100 pieces is considered a great rarity today. At least half of the known examples of the Proof 1888 Quarter Eagles have been certified by either PCGS or NGC, giving us a good luck at how that population has survived. The typical proof 1888 Quarter Eagle grades PR64, with a slightly smaller number in PR63. These diminished grades usually are the result of surface hairlines or post-Mint damage caused by improper storage or handling. Gems are very rare and anything better than PR66 is a true condition-rarity. The majority of the coins graded by PCGS are listed as brilliant, but this is because PCGS did not always recognize Cameo and Deep Cameo Proofs. Now that PCGS does recognize them, the majority (if not all) of the non-Cameo examples will probably move to the other categories. My guess is that the populations of the Cameo and Deep Cameo examples are nearly equal, though the Deep Cameo examples may be slightly less common.