1911 $5 (Proof)

Series: Indian Head $5 1908-1915

PCGS PR68

PCGS PR68

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PCGS PR67+

PCGS PR67+

PCGS PR67

PCGS PR67

PCGS #:
8542
Designer:
Bela Lyon Pratt
Edge:
Reeded
Diameter:
21.60 millimeters
Weight:
8.36 grams
Mintage:
139
Mint:
Philadelphia
Metal:
90% Gold, 10% Copper
Major Varieties

Current Auctions - PCGS Graded
Current Auctions - NGC Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - PCGS Graded
For Sale Now at Collectors Corner - NGC Graded

Rarity and Survival Estimates Learn More

Grades Survival
Estimate
Numismatic
Rarity
Relative Rarity
By Type
Relative Rarity
By Series
All Grades 80 R-8.2 5 / 8 TIE 5 / 8 TIE
60 or Better 75 R-8.2 6 / 8 TIE 6 / 8 TIE
65 or Better 36 R-8.7 6 / 8 6 / 8
Survival Estimate
All Grades 80
60 or Better 75
65 or Better 36
Numismatic Rarity
All Grades R-8.2
60 or Better R-8.2
65 or Better R-8.7
Relative Rarity By Type All Specs in this Type
All Grades 5 / 8 TIE
60 or Better 6 / 8 TIE
65 or Better 6 / 8
Relative Rarity By Series All Specs in this Series
All Grades 5 / 8 TIE
60 or Better 6 / 8 TIE
65 or Better 6 / 8

Condition Census What Is This?

Pos Grade Image Pedigree and History
1 PR68 PCGS grade PR68 PCGS grade
2 PR67+ PCGS grade
3 PR67 PCGS grade

Heritage 4/2013:4539, $99,875 - Leon Hendrickson Collection - Heritage 12/2015:3371, $88,125

3 PR67 PCGS grade

Heritage 8/2010:3531, $80,500

3 PR67 PCGS grade
3 PR67 PCGS grade
3 PR67 PCGS grade
8 PR66+ PCGS grade PCGS #8542 (PR)     66+
8 PR66+ PCGS grade
10 PR66 PCGS grade PCGS #8542 (PR)     66
PR68 PCGS grade #1 PR68 PCGS grade
#2 PR67+ PCGS grade
#3 PR67 PCGS grade

Heritage 4/2013:4539, $99,875 - Leon Hendrickson Collection - Heritage 12/2015:3371, $88,125

#3 PR67 PCGS grade

Heritage 8/2010:3531, $80,500

#3 PR67 PCGS grade
#3 PR67 PCGS grade
#3 PR67 PCGS grade
PCGS #8542 (PR)     66+ #8 PR66+ PCGS grade
#8 PR66+ PCGS grade
PCGS #8542 (PR)     66 #10 PR66 PCGS grade
Ron Guth:

The Matte Proof 1911 $5 is a very rare and desirable coin with a most unusual finish. According to Akers, the finish on the 1911 $5 is different than any other in the series. The difference resulted from the various experiments the Mint conducted in the early 20th century with finishes on Proof coins. The Mint produced the Matte Finish by sand-blasting the surfaces of the coins after they were struck. The texture of the finish varied depending on the size of the grit used to sand-blast the coin. Customers, who were used to the brilliant and cameo finishes of earlier years, either bought the Matte Proof coins begrudgingly or shied away from them completely. As a result, mintages were small and, even then, not all of the coins produced were sold.

Fortunately, the collectors who had the foresight to purchase these unusual coins also took good care of them. Thus, the quality of the surviving population is excellent. The PCGS Condition Census consists entirely of PR66 and better examples, and it tops out at PR68.

So many of these coins have been stripped in recent years that few examples retain their original orange- and olive-gold colors. One of the unique characteristics of Matte Proof gold of the early 20th century is the diversity of color from year to year.